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April 11, 1959 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, APRIL 11, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, APRIL 11, 1959

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ENDIALNO22513
ENDING TONIGHT

4."

U Program
To Discuss
Birth Impact
The impact of a child's arrival
and mother-baby relationships
are discussed on a University tele-
vision program at 8:30 a.m. today
on WXYZ-TV (Channel 7, De-
troit).
The program, "Baby's First
Weeks," produced by the Univer-
sity television office, reports that
modern doctors feel there is very
little difference between bottle
and breast feeding of a child.
A child psychiatrist, a pediatri-
cian, an pbstetrician and gynecol-
ogist combine to give a "vital"
look at the baby, the mother and
the family in the first weeks.
The physical impact of the birth
upon the mother, the emotional
climate, and the newborn baby
are described. Films of baby at the
hospital and at home highlight
the presentation.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

I 1 TI

ALTERNATE PLAY DIRECTOR:
Bender Channels Energies in Theatre

MPIlE DUCIN80ONWALTR REAN
WARDi
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YkAMM - Wc te m" o O W0AWK

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SUNDAY
~G I DGET1"

-Daily-Robert Kaplan
MIND OVER MATTER-The innermost secrets of Hindu philos-
ophy reach the ears of a Lane Hall Coffee Hour group, as Swami
Akilananda explains the role of meditation in achieving mental
stability. The religious leader presently heads a Hindu society
in Boston.
Mind Can Stabilize Life,
Swami Says to Group
-r a "T 'T R 71TLnI !nr2'i ?nrwArl'

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first
in a series of articles on the persons
responsible for the production 'of
speech department plays.)
By JUDITH DONER
Prof. Jack Benaer is one of the
people born with the theatre in
his blood, but he was not certain
until much later in which direc-
tion it ran.,
"I originally thought that I'd
teach in the field of speech, but
found that my greatest interest
was in the theatre," the genial di-
rector related.
One of three directors who al-
ternate work on speech depart-
ment productions, Prof. Bender
feels that the prime requisite for
a director is that he be sincere in
his relationships with all those
working under and with him.
Crew Left Out
"This is particularly true in
dealing with the, technical crew,"
he insisted. "They may feel left
out since their work, not the
people themselves, is the only
thing seen by the audience. I al-
ways try to point out to the ac-
tors exactly how great a part the
technicians play."
"It's wonderful when you have
a spirit and enthusiasm from
everyone."
Prof.nBender, who is presently
working largely in opera, acknowl-,
edged that he hadn't expected to
be working in this area. "It's defi-;
nitely been a'learn-as-I-go' pro-
cess." he laughingly admitted.
"But it has been most exciting."
Students Want To Act
"I've found that music school
students really want to learn to
be actors," he reported. "Maybe
this is heresy, but I would expect
that at least some of them lean
toward musical- comedy, rather
than operatic endeavors."
Many factors help to decide the

..

ENDING
TODAY

Lp

DIAL NO8-6416

DIAL
NO 8-6416

DIRECTOR SPEAKS-Prof. Jack E. Bender of the speech depart-
ment was in the technical phases of theatre before he became a
director. He is mostly concerned with opera production for the
Playbill Series.

I

"'TAUT AND COMPELLING'... AS CANDID AS
ICE CENSORS WILL ALLOW! "-Crowther, N. Y. Times
r H g hly
a 1 suspenseful French shocker!"
-Dorothy Masters, Doily Newv
new fin, JULIEN DUVIVIER
THE MALE"
Sunday: Fernandel in "MAN IN THE RAINCOAT"
e
Saturday 7:0 and 9:00
Sunday at 8:00
with
SPENCER TRACY
KATHERINE HEPBURN
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

By CHARLAINE ACKLRMA N
"Man's mind must be trained;
to stabilize and integrate his life,"
Hindu religious leader Swami Ak-
ilananda told a Lane Hall Coffee
Hour group yesterday.
In his discussion on Religion
in Emotional Integration: a Hindu
Perspective," the Swami attribut-
ed the "frightening number (one
million) of persons hospitalized
for mental diseases in this coun-
try" to the restlessness of human
nature. "Today's hedonism, by
which people strive to" enjoy the
world, produces frustration," he'
explained, "since we cannot do
and obtain everything that, we
desire."
Swami Akilananda, while not
questioning psychoanalysis' ability
to uncover primary and secondary
drives, did deny that it affords
more than temporary, relief. He
added that it lacks apreventive
approach.
Prevent Disturbance
"Religion," the Swami asserted,
"can help us prevent emotional
disturbances. The Hindu religion
tells us, for example, that the su-
preme goal of life is the knowl-
edge and understanding of God."
To resolve the conflict between
materialism and spiritualism,
Hinduism, he went on, places en-
joyment as a secondary objective.
With the first goal thoroughly
understood and applied, the sec-
ond is possible without the usual
frustrations, he said.
"The power to follow these pre-
cepts is inherent within us, but
man must develop his will power
or ego by concentration and medi-
tation. Convinced that there is an
absolute," the Swami said, "man
To Broadcast
40 Top Tunes
WCBN, the campus broadcast-
ing network, will broadcast its
'Top 40 Show' from the steps of
the General Library from 3:00'
p.m. to 5:45 p.m. today.

must then focus his attentions on
some embodiment or symbol
within his religion for a short
time each day,"
Islam World
Ends Feast
By JOAN KAATZ
Today the Muslim world will
conclude . its 'breakfast feast'
which follows the one-month fast-
ing period of Ramadan, Moham-
med Ghaly, president of the Mus-
lim Students' Association, ex-
plained.
The festival begins on the first
day of the lunar month, Shaw-
wal on the Muslim calendar,
which occurred Thursday. The
first act of that day is to give to
charity which is obligatory, he
said. This completes the previous
thirty days of fasting, he added.
Following the giving of charity,
a congregational morning service
is held either on an open square
or in a mosque. The conclusion
of that day and the remaining two
days are spent in various joyous
festivities, he said. It is a national
holiday in all the Muslim world.
The fasting period has three
important aspects, he commented.
It is primarily a training of' the
will and of self-discipline during
which one abstains from food,
drink, smoking and general physi-
cal pleasures from dawn until
sunset each day. This is an act
of worship to gain the will to act
righteously.
In Ann Arbor, it is often diffi-
cult for Muslim students to fol-
low this pattern, he said. Without
a family here, the student must
find someone to prepare his meal
after sunset because the hour
changes each month, Ghaly ex-
plained.
Even more difficult is the meal
before dawn, he continued. Many
of the students have to eat around
1 a.m. when they finish their
studying.
The second aspect of the fast
is celebratjng the revelation of the
first verses of the Koran which
occurred during the month of
Ramadan.
The abstention from food is
also significant because it is the
month of victory for the Muslim.
The celebration stems from the
defeat of paganism, the only ene-
my of Islam, Ghaly said.
Once the fast is broken by the
giving of charity, (which amounts.
to approximately fifty cents a
head) the Muslims are prohibited
to fast on that day, he continued.
Fasting is not an innovation of
the religion of Islam, he said, but
resembles similar rituals in Chris-
tianity and Judaism. It is known,
for example, that Jesus fasted be-
fore the Sermon on the Mount,
he explained.

chance to read, yet minimizing
time, he narrows the field down to
the point where only two or three
persons are competing for each
role;
"He looks for people to fill roles
as he sees them, although it is
possible that the director's con-
cept of a role may be changed
through an 'actor's interpretation
of it."
Although the casting is com-
pletely left to the director, the
individuals should -consider the
suitability of themselves for a
particular part, Prof. Bender in-
sisted.
Questioned as to which of his
plays he felt had come off best,
Prof. Bender insisted that "I
haven't been directing so long
that I have a great backlog of
plays to refer to."
Proud of 'Barber'
"I was very proud of 'The Bar-
ber of Seville'," he admitted. "And
I have a great fondness for 'Play-
boy' of the Western World.' al-
though it was far from 'a perfect
production."
Although generally satisfied
with the new facilities which the
speech department gained in its
move to the Frieze Building, Prof.
Bender expressed a wish to have
a "theatre plant .
"If I -were an administrator,
however, I probably would have
done the same thing which they
did," he candidly admitted.
Hughes, Scott
To Perform
Langston Hughes, noted Har-
lem poet, and Tony Scott, world-
famous jazz clarinetist, will com-
bine their talents in a "Poetry
and Jazz" concert at 8:30 p.m.
today in the Ann Arbor High
School Auditorium.
Essentially a, protest poet,
Hughes began reading some of his
poetry with a jazz piano accom-
paniment as far back as the twen-
ties. He believes that the combin-
ation of poetry and jazz -"will
bring poetry back: to. a broader
public appreciation."
Tony Scott, winner of the
Downbeat Metronome Award and
the International Jazz Critics
Award, is a musician with many
talents. He has done the arrang-
ing for many of Harry Belafonte's
'hit' records, as well as for Sarah
Vaughn and Claude Thornhill.

choice of a play to be done by the
speech department, Prof. 'Bender
said. "Directors generally have an
interest in doing p a r ti cu1 a r
things."
The availability of the roles is
a major consideration.."It is silly
to plan on doing Hamlet, if there
is no one who can play the part,"
he said. Along the same line, if a
play requires a large number of
people, it presents problems which
must be resolved before it can be
done.
Because the Playbill is a theatre

series, doing one show can pre-
clude doing another, Prof. Bender
explained. Presenting plays of dif-,
ferent types is important.
"'Tryouts for plays are open to
anyone, although students in the
speech department are always in
the majority," he reported. "How-
ever, anyone who is serious about
participating should do so and
should come to as many tryouts as
possible."
At every audition, the director's
concept of the play is explained.
Giving every individual the

1'
I

A

Group Reports 1,500 Signatures
On 'March for Integration' Petition

By PHILIP SHERMAN
A total of 1,300 people have
signed the petition for school in-
tegration being circulated on the
campus, Torre Bissel, '61, report-
ed yesterday.
About four to five hundred
more signatures are expected.
Chairman of the local commit-
tee of the "Youth March for In-
tegrated Schools," Bissel said he
was "quite pleased" with the re-
sults, and emphasized the cooper-
ative attitude of students when
informed of the'campaign's aims.
The local group, Bissel said,
plans to send about thirty dele-
gates to the national "youth
march" to be held in Washington,
April 18, which will present signed
petitions from campuses around
the nation to the President and
Congress.
March Held
Last year, a similar march was,
held, drawing 12,000 people. The
marchers were unable to see eith-
er the President or Congress.
The breakdown, day by day, of
signatures, according to Bissel is:
Wednesday, 250; Thursday, 500;
Friday, 650. He pointed out that
this figure did not include peti-
tions sent to all housing units of
the University, which 'had not
been returned.
Bissel asked that any such peti-
tions outstanding be returned to
the Congregational D i s c i p l e s
Guild, the sponsoring organiza-
tion, at 524 Thompson St.
In addition to this, Bissel asked
that any other people interested
in going to Washington contact
the Guild. He said accommoda-
tions in Washington would be ar-
ranged, but that transportation
was not certain. A meeting will
be held sometime next week to
discuss this.
Depends on Cars
The group is depending on pri-
vate cars to make the trip.
The National Committee of the
youth march campaign, including
such people as Harry Belafonte,
the Rev. Martin Luther King,

Walter Reuther, Jackie Robinson
and Norman Thomas, has stated
five reasons for the march.
First, they are campaigning for
democracy, since they feel that
the southern minority, by keep-
ing schools segregated, is flouting
the' democratic process.
They are defending the Su-
preme Court, which they -charac-
terize as a courageous defender.
of Negro rights, from attacks to
curb its powers.
The group is supporting civil
rights legislation as the defense
of American democracy. The
Douglas-Celler-Javits-Powell bill
receives their specific support.
A draft of legislation based on
this bill has been prepared by the
committee. It includes a proposal
to abolish the filibuster and a bill
to use federal funds to keep
schools open in states where they
have been closed.
Other legislation would include
a campaign distributing informa-
tion on .communities .which have
integrated peacefully, and finally,
a law permitting the federal gov-
ernment to bring suit directly for,
the integration of schools. The
group says that the present situ-
ation puts too much strain on in-

dividuals and NAACP organiza-
tions.
By confronting the President,
the committee hopes to force
strong executive action based on
the 1954 Supreme Court decision.
Lastly, they say they are
marching as a part of the Ameri-
can's democratic duty to register
protest against practices they feel
are wrong.

3 U'

ENDING
TONIGHT

WON a1'

LATE SHOW
TONIGHT
11 P.M.

Winner of Nine
ACADEMY AWARDS
including "BEST PICTURE"
"G"
by the Composers of "My Fair Lady"
MAURICE LESLIE
CHEVALIER CARON
IN TECHNICOLOR

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