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April 07, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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TU S A , A R L 7 95 H -HG N D ~ Y lAI ' ,vi~ '

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Bandits Get
Fraternity
Cash, Goods
By PETER DAWSON
Thieves made off with a reported
$1,500 in cash and possessions from
five fraternity houses over spring
vacation.
A hi-fidelity phonograph, rec-
ords and clothes, worth together
about $800, were taken from Zeta
#Beta Tau. A $200 television set, a
$60 short-wave radio and other
possessions were taken from Alpha
Epsilon Pi.
Thieves took approximately $400
from the wallets of membersof
three other fraternities. Members
of Sigma Phi Epsilon lost $81; Tau
Delta Phi, $150-$200; and Phi Sig-
ma Delta, about $150.
Police said the wallet robberies
seemed to be the work of profes-
sionals who took advantage of the
confusion in the fraternities and
the fatigue of the members return-
ing from home with money. They
occurred early Monday morning.
Police added that fraternities
have been robbed many times in
the past around vacations and that
robbers continue to be successful
despite warnings to students.
The thieves apparently entered
the Tau Delta Phi house by break-
ing a side window, police said. At
Zeta Beta Tau, an upstairs window
was broken and a side door was
found standing open! A fire escape
leads to the window. The route of
the thieves was not certain.
Like the wallet robberies, the
Tau Delta Phi theft apparently
happened early this morning.

Indians Thrive Again in Butsch Villages

By SHARON EDWARDS
RobertaS.nButsch is a man with
a deft talent for creating whole
communities.
Butsch, assistant to the director
of the University Exhibit Museum,
designs and constructs Indian dio-
ramas.
The dioramas are scale con-
structions of American Indian

plaster molds and manipulated to
suit the activities represented.
Butsch not only does this basic
design and construction but also
completes every detail of clothfhg,
tools, housing and vegetation.
According to Butsch, the scale
presents no special problem to his
construction. A certain amount of
imagination is required, however.
Representation of grass, for 'ex-
ample, may require some ingenuity
when the horses feeding on it are
only three inches high.
Zoology Interest
When asked what special inter-
ests had led him into his unique
occupation, Butsch replied, "I am
a zoologist and interested in an-
thropological materials as they
apply to natural history."
The dioramas currently on ex-
hibit are primarily of North Amer-
ican Indians. Four older recon-
structions of Michigan Indians are
SeTTATSIO V UOSVS 5 Ol Og paJOAap
of the Chippewa.
In addition, there are six very
new dioramas representing In-
dians of different cultural areas.
Indians of the northwest coast,
north central California, the great
plateau-basin of the central west,
the Mackenzie area, eastern wood-
lands and central Eskimo areas
are depicted.
Butsch is presently completing
construction of two more dioramas
to round out the set of eight de-
voted to American Indians north
of Mexico.
Five small and very simple dio-
ramas portray South American In-
dians, from the farmers and mari-
ners of the Caribbean to the em-
pire builders of the Andes.

Kreger Wins
Assembly
Position
Connie Kreger; '60, was unani-
mously elected first vice-president
of Assembly Association at yester-
day's meeting of Assembly Dormi-
tory Council.
Miss Kreger, 20 years old and a
resident of Martha Cook, will take
office at League Installation Night
to be held Monday.
Termed the "internal president"
by Pat Marthenke, '59, out-going
Assembly president, the first vice-
president acts as coordinator of all
committees formed by the Assem-
bly executive board, with particu-
lar emphasis placed on her work
with the Housing Committee,
Miss Kreger's responsibilities will
include close cooperation and work
with the vice-presidents of all the
independent housing units.She
will also, Miss Marthenke added.
work with the Assembly president
in all matters, including those in-
volving policy making.
Ex-officio membership on ADC,
League Council and Women's Sen-
ate are part of the duties the first
vice-president assumes.
The first vice-president, together
with the corresponding officers of
Panhellenic Association and Wom-
en's League, now has authority in
setting up agendas for Senate
meetings.

Sophistication do you have it?
Do you manage to be poised and con-
fident on any occasion? Learn what
sophistication really means , in this
week's Star Weekly... on sale all week.
Look for the BLUE COVER.
TUESDAY SPECIALS
After-Easter

-Daily-Richard Bracken
INDIAN DIORAMA--A village of the Northwest Coastal area is
one of a series of reconstructions of North American Indian
communities now on display at the Exhibit Museum. Fine detail
endows the miniatures with an atmosphere of reality.

ROBERT BUTSCH
.. . museum preparator
communities. They are designed to
integrate the various museum ex-
hibits of American Indian anthro-
pological materials.
Plastic Molds
The construction of the dioramas
involves a basic design of the de-
sired layout for both the rounded
background and the foreground
figures. Wax figures are created in

In designing a diorama, Butsch
said, illustrations of a typical kind
of geographical locale, as well as
of the types of houses and cloth-
ing is most important.
In some instances, he added, a
more specific design is employed.
As an example, he pointed out the
Central Plains diorama he is cur-
rently construcing, which concerns
the tanning of leather. Such ac-
tivities are chosen with care,
said Butsch. In this instance, tan-
ning techniques were quite univer-
sally the same among American
Indians.
Their particular significance to
the Central Plans lies in their

greatly inbcreased useage after
trade was established with the
white man, and the subsequent ex-
tinction of the American buffalo.
When possible, he added, such ac-
tivities are combined with the rep-
resentation of village life.
Other Fields
Although his principal work is
the construction "of the dioramas.
Butsch also has designed and con-
structed many of the Exhibit Mu-
seum's small mammal and bird
natural habitat groups. As museum
preparator, he instructs small un-
dergraduate classes in museum
techniques.
"Dr. Butsch's academic training
and field experience in combina-
tion with his artistic ability make
him a one-man team," said Irving
G. Reimann, director of the Mu-
seum. "He is qualified not only to
make dioramas and habitat groups
but also to do the research neces-
sary to assure their accuracy and
authenticity of detail."

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INDIAN JOURNALISM STUDENT:
Hejmadi Describes Adjustment to U.S. Customs

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By JOAN KAATZ
Putting one's values into a cock-
tail shaker and then pouring out a
mixture of old and new ideas is
the way Padma Hejmadi describes
her adjustment to American life.
An Indian graduate student in
journalism, Miss Hejmadi said, for
instance, she often found it diffi-
cult to comprise the reticence in
speaking found in India and the
bluntness and openness of Ameri-
can students, particularly in dis-
cussions of dates and social affairs.
Perhaps the adjustment she
finally attained can be depicted by
her participation in American ac-
tivities, such as Generation maga-
zine, and the retention of wearing
the customary Indian sari.
Hopwood Winner
Creative writing is one of Miss
Hejmadi's main interests, and last
spring she won a major Hopwood
fiction award. Upon her return to
India, she hopes to write literary
pieces in journals for women and
children.
Few of the Indian magazines for
women have a stimulating content,
she commented, in addition to suf-
fering from poor paper and print
quality. Miss Hejmadi attributed
part of Indian journalism's diffi-
culty to the 16 per cent literacy
rate in her nation.
Art and music criticism intrigue
Miss Hejmadi, particularly the
relations of silences and sounds
in music. In Western music it is as
if silence has been poured into the
sound of the music, she said, while
"Indian music is as if sound has
been poured into silence."
English Unpopular
She pointed to the recently in-
creasing unpopularity of English
in India and said that "whatever
I have to offer will not only have
to be intellectually stimulating .. .
but will also have to be immediate,
Prof. Kawar
To Lecture
"Muhammed and Alexander"
will be the lecture topic of Prof.
Irfan Kawar, of the, oriental lan-
guages department at the UCLA
at 4:15 p.m. today in Aud. C, An-
gell Hall.
The lecture is sponsored jointly
by the history and Near Eastern
studies departments.

in detail. The press played a large
part in the gaining of India's in-
dependence, she said.
Complaints are often lodged that
there aren't enough human inter-
est stories in the press, she said..
Discusses Press
In general the Indian press is
neutral in foreign affairs, follow-
ing the government policy; but
the press does not hesitate to criti-
cize constructively the country's
domestic policies, Miss Hejmadi
said. This is necessary in a new
nation, she commented, and the
press has been very sincere in its
attitude.
Previous to coming to the United
States, Miss Hejmadi did free-
lance writing for "The Times of
India" and the "Hindu" news-
papers. She also worked on gov-
ernment publications and radio,
writing her own script for a broad-
cast to foreign countries.
A magazine of short stories, es-
says and poetry for a more sophis-
ticated audience is another job
she left in India, and might like to
go back to, she said.
Miss Hejmadi has been at the
University on a Barbour scholar-
ship for Orient~l Women for a
year and a half and expects to
return to India by 1960.

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O
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"

INDIAN WRITER -- Padma Hejmadi, graduate student in
journalism, plans to return to her India and write creatively in
in English, which is becoming increasingly unpopular in the
Eastern country.

ON FOREST
off corner
South U.
opposite
Campus Theatre

at
CAMPUS
TOGS
1111 South U.

direct and urgent in its appeal."
Miss Hejmadi plans to write in
English.
One of the problems of the press
in India has been the variation of
languages, she said. There are 15
major languages and 200 dialects,
causing many papers to be re-

stricted to the region where its
language form is used. Hindi is
more or less understood every-
where, she said, and so the Hindu
papers have wider circulation.
. About 45 per cent of Indian
press is devoted to foreign news,
she explained, but India's own
domestic politics are still covered

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* E Ee1U "U UEU MUM a

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Socialist Set
To Lecture

Prof. Irving Howe of Brandeis
University and editor of Dissent
magazine, will speak to the Uni-
versity Democratic Socialist club
on "Socialism: Problem and
Ideal" at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the
Union.
Dissent magazine is a journal
of socialist opinions. Prof. Howe
is also editor of "The Treasury of
Yiddish Stories" and "Modern
Literary Criticism," and author
of "The American Communist
Party: A Critical History," "Poli-
tics and the Novel," "The UAW
and Walter Reuther," "William
Fauklner: A Critical Study," and
"Sherwood Anderson."

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