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March 17, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY

TINE lWICIIIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, I

Counseling Not Satisfactory,
Office of Education Discovers'

Assembly
To Choose
Own Head

t

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first
of a series that will explore the ex-
tent and character of retention,
transfer and withdrawal of students
from coleges and universities. It is
based on a report released by the Of-
fice of Education of the United States
Department of Health, Education and
Welfare.) L
BY SELMA SAWAYA
Students participating in the
survey conducted by the Office of
Education were almost unanimous
in expressing their dissatisfaction
with the counseling, guidance and
orientation functions in higher
education.
The questionnaires included a
list of college facilities and serv-
ices which students were to rate
-Daily-Allan Winder as either very satisfactory, fairly
offering brand-new post-Alaska satisfactory, somewhat unsatisfac-
Ly won't be legal until July 4, tory, or very unsatisfactory.
since Hawaii plans to become a The facilities to be rated includ-
ed opportunities for private con-
ferences with instructors, study
conditions in libraries and in stu-
aktes dents! rooms, opportunity for so-
cial contact with both faculty and
students, opportunity to secure
'O bsolete adequate housing, and so forth.
Of the 51 items on the ques-
tionnaire, students consistently
ranked three the lowest: 1) assist-
on the street was asked what to do ance from counselors in "how to
with the 50th star. study" techniques; 2) assistance
"I guess the obvious way is to from instructors on "how to
have five rows of 10 stars," Faith study" techniques; and 3) serv-
Pulliam, '62, suggested. ices of the faculty advisor in help-
A University Elementary School ing select first-term courses.
student, William Beierwaltes, 11 Counseling Criticized
years old, offered the most eco- Of the 10 items receiving the
nomical suggestion. Profoundly lowest rating from the students,
chewing the leather case of his at least a majority referred to in-
ukulele between words, he said, structional facilities and services,
"Well, they could keep the 49-star criticizing specifically the guid-
flag and hang another one under it ance and counseling category.
with one star on it." Other items which fell in the

"bottom 10," indicating a great
deal of dissatisfaction, were:
1) Recreational facilities in
town;
2) Compulsory chapel and as-
sembly attendance;

These were (in descending or-
der of satisfaction):%
1) Opportunities for religious
life.
2) Opportunity for informal so-
cial contacts with students.
3) Opportunity to participate in
organized student activities out-
side the classroom.
Mentions Fraternities
4) Opportunity to join a frater-
nal group of my liking.
5) Customs and practices re-
garding campus apparel.
Library facilities and services,
opportunity to secure 'adequate
housing, opportunity to secure
loans from the college, opportu-
nity to consult from time to time
with major professor, and oppor-
tunity to have private conferences
with instructors on academic
questions stemming from course
work, also received student ap-
proval.
In general, students reacted
most favorably to those services
and facilities which were per-
formed or provided by adminis-
trative officials, and ranked those
performed or provided by non-
academic deans second.
David Talks
At Rackham
Hans David, professor of music
in the University's music school
will lecture on "An Italian Tabla-
ture Lesson of the High Renais-
sance" at 4:15 today in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
The lecture is being held under
the auspices of the School of
Music.

By CAROL LEVENTEN
Assembly Dormitory Council
voted to elect its own president
yesterday.
The president will be elected by
the 21 members of ADC, and will
not be chosen in an open election.
Both candidates for president,
Joan Comiano, '61, and Donnie
Kreger, '60, supported the motion,
which passed by a two-thirds ma-
jority.
The motion began with a dis-
cussion of campaign difficulties
arising under the present situa-
tion. Pat Marthenke, '59, president
of Assembly, said that the new
plan would be the "best way of
getting the most intelligent vote."
It was argued that members of
ADC were better qualified to elect
their president since they have
worked with both candidates
throughout the year.
Assembly's president was last
chosen in open election in 1956.
Last year. Miss 'Marthenke was
the only one who ran; in 1957,
when there were two candidates,
ADC elected their president
among themselves.
Chris Wells, '59, said that Betsy
Barbour has voted to become an
upperclass house, but that this
needs further consideration. Miss
Marthenke said that, the Board of
Governors has "not accepted the
philosophy of upperclass housing,"
adding that the need wasn't great
enough last year to warrant hav-
ing two upperclass houses this
year. Markley's Little House is re-
served for junior and senior wo-
men at present. The Housing
committee's report recommended
a further study of the need ad
interest in upperclass housing.

i

4,

I

14

ACADEMIC COUNSELING
... criticized '

SGC Issues Viewed

3) Opportunity for informal so-
cial contacts with faculty mem-
bers;
Intellectualism Lacking
4) Degree of emphasis in col-
lege on intellectual and cultural
pursuits outside of the classroom.
Students were not dissatisfied
with everything, however. The re-
port also showed that the item on
the questionnaire which received
the most consistent support as
"very satisfactory" was "oppor-
tunities for religious life."
This consensus,. the report said,
"does not support the opinion of
some who charge that institutions
of higher education are godless
and materialistic. Considering the
diversity of religious backgrounds
represented on the college cam-
pus, it could be inferred that in-'
stitutions of higher education
have done remarkably well in pro-
viding opportunities for religious
life."
Some 'Satisfactory'
While those participating in the
survey ranked counseling and
guidance services very low, they
ranked facilities and services con-
nected with social or religious life
very high. Of the 10 items most
consistently marked "very satis-
factory," five were concerned with
social or religious opportunities.

A "new approach to orientation
with more emphasis on the aca-
demic than the social side" was
advocated by Jo Hardee, '60.
Ijarry Cummins, '61, is against
deferred rushing for women. He
also wants more liberal driving
regulations to enable students
with permits to more fully utilize
them.
Also speaking on the radio
broadcast, Bob Garb, '62, said SGC
could always go back to the Stu-
dent Legislature plan as a "last
resort."
Wants Action
Housing and traffic situations
should be the principal concern
of SGC, according to David Kes-
sel, Grad. He also considers fac-
ulty, student and administration
conferences "great."
"Student pressure on the State
Legislature should be brought to
bear for more money for the Uni-
versity," Mike Fishman, '60, said
on WCBN.
James Damm, '61E, advocates
constant review and possible re-
vision of University regulations by
SGC. He also advises more Coun-
cil participation in activities to
combat student apathy.
At the Alpha Tau Omega fra-
ternity, John Feldkamp, '61, spoke
in favor of eliminating SGC's ju-
dicial powers to make it a service-
organi.ation for the University.
Howard, Stein, '61, is primarily
concerned with the acadcmic
function of SGC and more con-
sideration of the Course Evalua-
tion Booklet. He also favors fall
rushing for sororities.

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Organization
Notices
A.I.E.E. - Student Branch. annual
paper contest, March 18, 7:30 p.m.,
Union.
Am. Rocket Soc., meeting, movie:
History of Rocketry, March 17, 7:30
p.m., 2084 E. Engin.
* * *
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
coffee break, March 17, 4:30-6 p.m.,
Guild House.
* * *
French Club, Dostoievski's "Criwe et
Chatimeut," March 19, 8 p.m., Under-
grad. Library, multi-purpose rm.
Graduate Student Coffee Hour, March
18, 4-5:30 p.m., Rackham Bldg., 2nd
Floor, W. Lounge. All graduate students
invited.
* * *
Public Relations Comm. of SGC,
meeting, March 17, 4 p.m., 1548 SAB.
New members welcome or call Ron Bas-
sey, chairman, NO 3-3307.
* * *
U. of M. Rifle Club, rifle match
scheduled for week of March 16 is can-
celed due to insufficient participation.
Women's Rifle Club, meeting, March
17, 7 p.m., WAB. Match to be shot.

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