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August 31, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-08-31

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAIL'Y'

Soturday, August 31, 1968

PageTwo THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, August 31, 1968

Allies turn back
D Nang attack

Moscow

delivers Czechs

'purge or perish' warning

SAIGON (2)-Allied forces, sup-
ported by dive bombers, beat back
an enemy drive against Da Nang,
the country's second largest city,
and killed 126 infiltrators in three
sharp, battles, military spokesmen
reported yesterday. Elsewhere
ground action was sporadic.
In another development, Amer-
ican prisoners rioted yesterday
in the U.S. Army's largest penal
stockade in Vietnam at Long
Binh. Before military police could
put down the disorders, 59 prison-
ers, four MPs and the acting
warden were injured, and a num-
ber of buildings in the compound
burned.
BATTLES
The three battles occurred
Thursday nine to 25 miles south
of Da Nang, target of another
abortive enemy drive lastweek-
end.
South Vietnamese rangers, back-
ed by an armored column and
dive bombers, reported killing 87
Communists in the heaviest of
the three battles. Ranger losses
were. put at five dead and 23
wounded.
A mile away, about 150 U.S.
Marines came under heavy small-
arms fire while combing the area
for infiltrators. Another 15
Leathernecks reinforced them
while American fighterbomber
and artillery pounded the Com-
Army unit
inspected.
for fraud
LOS ANGELES (NP) - Rep. Ed
Reinecke, (R-Calif.), says the
Army is investigating National
Guard records that allegedly were
falsified to show a California unit
had been adequately prepared for
Vietnam duty.
In an interview with the Los
Angeles Times, Reinecke .said yes-
terday, the unit, the 1st Squad-
ron, 18th Armored Cavalry, is
currently undergoing extra train-
ing at Ft. Lewis, Wash., to make
up its training deficiencies.
Sixth Army headquarters in San
Francisco acknowledged that the'
unit is at Ft. Lewis but declined
to release further information
about Reinecke's charges.
DISCREPANCIES
'Reinecke said the unit was
scheduled to go to Vietnam Sept.
25 but was ordered to the Wash-
ington post after inspector gen-
eral's officers found discrepan-
cies in personnel records.
The men "were credited with
training they did not receive,"
Reinecke said.
For example, records showed
them prepared to'drive diesel en-
ines, while they had been train-
ed with gasoline engines; able to
use M-16 rifles, while they were
trained with M14 rifles, and cap-
able of handling M113 armored
personnel carriers, while they were
trained with M48 tanks, he said.
RECORD-FIXING
The alleged record-fixing occur-
red before the unit's callup was
announced and was discovered as
'the. men prepared to leave for
Vietnam, Reinecke said.
An unidentified sergeant to I d
Army investigators he was ordered
by an officer to change military
occupation specialties on the re-
cords of many enlisted men, and
caused the unit to be transferred
to Ft. Lewis, Reineke said.
The unit, with a home base at
Burbank, Calif., had been desig-
nated as one of the National

Guard's Selected Reserve Force
Units, designed to be at combat
ready status for quick callup.'
COMPLAINTS
Reinecke said he had com-
plained to Rep. L. Mendel Rivers,
(D-S.C.), chairman of the House
Armed Services Committee, and
to Ernest L. Massad, deputy assis-
tant secretary of the Army in
charge of 9rmy Reserves. He said
both promised an investigation.
Since the discovery of the fal-
sification, many officers and al-
most all the noncommissioned of-
ficers had been transferred,
Reinecke said. The unit's authori-
zed strength is 49 officers, three
warrant officers, and 1,042 enlist-
ed men.

munist positions. The Communist'
force pulled back after 3%'2-hous .
and a sweep of the battlefield;
turned up 24 of their bodies. Ma- .i
rine loses were reported at two
dead and 41 wounded.«
Another U.S. Marine unit clash- .
ed with two platoons of Northj
Vietnamese soldiers--70 to 80
men-about 25 miles south of Da r
Nang. Dive bombers and artillery
were called during the height of
the battle. The North Vietnamese:
pulled back after killing eight
Marines and wounding 11. The
Marines reported killing 15 North X
Vietnamese.
LOWLANDS
In the central lowlands, Com-
munist troops were still reported
holding out last night in a gov-
ernment outpost they overran
near the Ha Thanh Special Forces Y
camp 15 miles west of Quang Ngai
City. «.::
The government outpost, hous-
ing four to 12 defenders, was over-
run early yesterday. The North
Vietnamese then set up six mor-
tars, two recoilless rifles and a This was the scene inside the
machine gun and lobbed shells to dismantle platforms and c
into the Green Berets' camp.
Reinforcements from the 11th
Light Infantry Brigade were sent
in to dislodge thehinvaders, butNi
the U.S. Command said the ene- N t
my was still holding on at last
report last night.
SABOTAGE PLOT CHICAGO - Mayor Richa
In Saigon, police were reported J. Daley says extraordinary- s
to have nipped a Viet Cong sabo- curity precautions were takena
tage and assassination plot with the Democratic National Conve
the arrest of about a dozen sus- tion because "certain people
pects in Cholon, the Chinese sec- planned to assassinate him a
tor of the city. A Viet Cong pris- three presidential candidates.
oner led police and security forces The mayor, under attack b
to a group of houses where a some convention delegates for t
cache of weapons and explosives stringent security precautions, d
was seized and the arrests made. not disclose who the "certa:
In the air war, U.S. B52 bom- people" were.
ers flew 11 missions late Thurs- The three contenders who Dal
day and early yesterday to break said were threatened were Vi
up North Vietnamese concentra- President Hubert H. Humphre
tions, staging areas and camps who won the party's nominatio
in South Vietnam. and Sens. Eugene J. McCart
Children crusade to Hanoi
for ComImunist teaching
By JOHN T. WHEELER litical education away from t]
SAIGON RP) - Hundreds of seat of revolutionary doctrinei
children have trudged over the Hanoi is open to slips in theo
Ho Chi Minh trail on their way andbecause of the demandsc
to Hanoi for years of political in- war cannot be as completea
doctrination that will make them Communists prefer such thin
the new Communist elite in South So the march North. T h o
Vietnam. that go, according to the captur
Enemy prisoners and defectors documents, are children of lo
have reported seeing the children level cadre, those whose paren
some appearing as young as 8, "joined the revolutionary caus
marching with small packs and especially those whose paren
through the jungle vastness of the died for Hi Chi Minh's dream
highlands toward Sambodia. One a unified, Communist Vietnai
North Vietnamese soldier said he Children of the poor were eligibl
transport plane picked up the for selection.
was told a North Vietnamese HUNDREDS
transport plane picked up t h e Although U.S. sources say th
children at a secret landing field have no idea how large the migr
in Cambodia's jungled highlands. tion was, one enemy soldier sa
CAPTURED DOCUMENTS he understood it numberedi
show the hundreds. All village commi
Captured documents sowthat tesmangmoehn1,
the order for what one' source villages, were t htasbn
wryly called "the children's cru- names.
sade," dates at least to October A North Vietnamese soldier wi
1967. The migration of an unspec- met one group on the trail sa
ified number of children up to the 10 children ranged from
17 years old was to be completed to 15 years old.
by this month.
The Hanoi government appar-
ently has two aims in mind. The
one that most concerns some
quarters here is that after the CINEM A I
children return they will form a
vital political nucleus to help sub-
vert and ultimately overthrow any presents
possible coalition regime agreed
to as a possible way to end the
war in the South.MA L FIE
The second is that jungle po

I
C
I
i
f
i

-Associated Press
Piles and piles of ...
International Ampitheatre in Chicago as maintenance men began
clean away debris le ft by delegates to the Democratic Convention.
onal news roundup

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
PRAGUE (A') - Thinly veiled
by Communist jargon, the mes-
sage from Moscow to Czechoslo-
vakia sounds like "purge or per-
ish,"
Failure of the Czechoslovak Com-
munist party to comply xw i t h
demands from the Kremlin can
lead to a situation resembling in
some respects that of 1956 in
Hungary.1
"Geluine, dyed-in-the wool
counterrevolutionary elements"
continue to be active in Czecho-
slovakia, Pravda has complained.
The implication is that what hap-
pens now depends upon how far
Czechoslovak leaders go, or are
able to go, toward satisfying the
Soviet Politburo's demands.
The Kremlin never has taken
kindly to humiliation or setbacks.
It has made a heavy investment
in the invasion, of Czechoslovakia.
By the Soviet party's own implied
admission, the price was high in
terms of prestige and Kremlin ef-
forts to reunite the Communist
movement.
Moscow probably will want full
value for that investment. Such an
attitude would argue strongly
against letting remain in author-
ity indefinitely those leaders the
Russians have called counterrevo-
lutionary and right wing. They
include Alexander Dubcek and
others whom the Czech party de-
fiantly elected to office in a spec-
ial congress which Moscow now
angrily calls illegal.
Moscow's words suggest that
there must 'be a housecleaning.
Soviet troops may move as far
away as the West German bor-
der, but they will still be in a
position to return quickly to
Prague.

by Soviet guns, formed a newt
government.
There are some differences thisf
time. The Czechoslovak partyt
under Premier Oldrich Cernik.
have not even intimated an inten-
tion of repudiating the Warsaw
Pack, as did the revolutionary
Hungarian government. The re-
gime remained wholly Commun-
ist. Otherwise, however, there is
enough excuse in the' situation tol
prompt the Russians to swift sur-

gery. crushing Czechoslovakia's reform
The Russians can do the job' program. If the Russians bring
themselves if the Czechoslovak pressure on Romania, then Yugo-
party fails to produce a house- slavia and its independent Com-
cleaning. In any case, Moscow munists, another irritant for
seems unlikely to be happy with Moscow, would feel directly ea-
Dubcek since he was a symbol of dangered.
Nixon denies own role

in, No.Ye

electors plan

the liberal movement. Some
Czechoslovak liberalizers already
are in hiding or out of the cou*-
try.
"We are living through difficult
times," said Premier Ion Maurer
of Romania in a speech this week,
The Romanian party chief, Nico-
lae Ceasusescu, spoke of "great
bitterness, great anxiety."
Obviously the Russians are .uW
happy that Romania's leaders
sharply criticized Moscow for

rd and George McGovern. his spirits have graduated to "ex-
e- Daley disclosed the threats, cellent." He has even begun to
at "something I have never said to read in bed.
n- anyone," in a television interview Prior to yesterday's bulletin, the
e" with CBS newscaster Walter farthest doctors at Walter Reed
d Cronkite. Army Hospital had gone in de-
scribing the general's spirits was
by WASHINGTON - The' Justice to say they were "remarkably
he Department disclosed yesterday good" or that he was "cheerful."
id that conversations by former On the medical side, the doctors
in heavyweight champion Cassius reported that the recently noted
Clay'were "bugged" in 1964 and favorable downward trend in
ey 1965. cardiac irritability-extra and ir-
ce regular heart heats-has contin-
y, ; The department's disclosure was ued since Thursday's reports.
n, made in a memorandum filed
hy with the U.S. Supreme Court, CHARLESTOWN, W. Va. -
- although it said Clay was not the The federal court jury consider-
principle objective of the elec- ing the conspiracy case of former
tronic eavesdropping. Gov. W. W. Barron and four
The former champion, who pre- others told the judge yesterday
fers his Black Muslim name of it was unable to reach a verdict,
IMuhammed Ali, has pending be- but was sent back to try again.
fore the Supreme Court an appeal Judge J. Robert Martin told the
from his conviction and sentenc- court that he was informed
ing for refusing induction into the around lunch time that the jury
in armed forces, was deadlocked. However, he told,
in the jury, which was returned to
ry In one instance, the memoran- the courtroom just after 3 p.m.,
of dum said, the electronic eaves- to go back and try again to reach
as , dropping occurred in the course a verdict.
gs. of the collection of "foreign in- Barron and four others, includ-
s e telligence information." ing two former West Virginia
ed **state officials, were charged Feb.
w- WASHINGTON (AP - A r m y 14 by a federal grand jury of
ts doctors, reporting a slow but so conspiring to commit bribery in
e" far steadily improvement in for- the award of state contracts dur-
its mer President Dwight D. Eisen- ing Barron's administration in
of hower's condition, said yesterday 1961-65.
, le

NEW YORK OP) - Richard M,
Nixon had told New York State
Republican and Conservative
party leaders they will have to
decide among themselves whether
to file joint electors for the presi-
dential election.
DENIES PLAN
Nixon's headquarters issued a
statement Thursday denying that
he favored a Conservative plan
to have both parties file joint
electors. Conservative party
Chairman J. Daniel Mahoney had
said Nixon, the Republican party's
presidential candidate, favored the
move.
The Nixon statement, however,
did not flatly reject the proposal.
"The question of the designation
of joint electors by the political
parties," it said, "is a matter
which must be resolved by those
organizations."
NEW YORKERS
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller, Sen.
Jacob K. Javits and Mayor John

honey noted in a letter to Re-
publican State Committee mem-
bers, had a joint slate of elec-
tors with the Democrats when
John F. Kennedy carried the state
in 1960.
The Nixon statement said thO
former vice president "seeks the
support of all voters who agree
with his principles."
"We trust,". it said, "the reso-
lution of this problem will be in
a manner not detrimental to Mr.
Nixon's interests, to the end that
an effective campaign may &
waged in New York, which will
lead to victory in this state."

i

Tn T-Tt? nmarv 19 trnara ecru +hn

people breathed a sigh of relief idea. Lindsay argued
Oct. 29, 1956 when the revolution all a plot to attra
seemed victorious. A new govern- James Buckley, Conse
ment and party leadership an- didate running again
nounced that Soviet troops would The Conservatives
withdraw from Budapest.ITh Cosraie
Hungary's euphoria lasted four Joint electors would
Nixon-Agnew ticket t
or five days before new fear grip-- York State against
ped the nation. Yr tt gis
In the predawn hou's of Nov. phrey-Muskie ticket
e pr aw ous o ov.Conservative and
4, Soviet troops descended again votes together.
on Budapest. Soon it was all over. testte.
Moscow's picked man, supported The state's Liberal

oppose the
that It was
ct votes to
ervative can-
st Javits.
claim th e
enable the
o carry New
the Hum-
by lumping
Republican
party, Ma-.

lul
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Dir. Billy Wilder, 1950

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7:30 P.M., Tuesday, Sept. 3rd
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"IT IS UNTHINKABLE FOR
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-N. Y. Times
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MEN'S GLEE CLUB
GENERAL MEETING
Tues., Sept. 3, 7:00 P.M.

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