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August 30, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-08-30

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Friday, August 30, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, August 30, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

MASKED TROOPS:
Shots fired at Mexican school

I

as violence continues

MEXICO CITY (IP)-Sounds of
gunfire echoed again yesterday
in Mexico City, troubled by stu-
dent unrest since July 26.
Residents near the Foreign Min-
istry reported a predawn assault'
on a preparatory school occupied
by students.
From throughout the city came
#reports of students holding their
schools, awaiting fulfillment of a
rumor government troops would
try to occupy the schools and de-
prive students of a place to as-
semble.
Noone could confirm the af-
filiation of a group of masked men
who drove up to Preparatory
School No. 7, about 200 yards
from the Foreign Ministry, at
4:20 a.m. and loosed a hail of gun-

fire at the school, which had
been guarded through the night
by about 20 students.
Spent cartridges from M1 rifles
and .45-caliber pistols littered the
street. Newsmen who arrived min-
utes later saw-.student? angrily
dismiss ambulances.
They told the newsmen two per-
sons had been wounded in the
MSU students
win court, fi L ,t
LANSING W) - The trespass
convictions of four youths who
joined an antiwar demonstration
at a Michigan State University
"Career Carnival" have been over-
turned by a split decision of the
state Court of Appeals.
The four demonstrated near a
U.S. Marine Corps booth in the,
MSU student union in 1967, hand-
ing out literature and displaying
signs opposing the Vietnam war
and seeking contributions for
"medical aid for the Viet Cong."
Trial testimony showed the
youths were told by the director of
MSU's placement office that they
were welcome to stay at the carni-
val, but that they would have
to take their signs and handbills
outside the building,

in Capital
neighborhood had taken them to
a private doctor for treatment.
Residents of nearby apartments
said they saw about 15 vehicles
pull up before the school and
men, some with white helmets,
others with handkerchiefs or
masks on their faces, begin firing.
Windows were shattered and the
building was pocked with bullets.
President Gustavo Diaz Ordaz,
who personally has become the
target of demonstrators original-
i protesting generally against
government policy and police,
made several public appearances
Wednesday.
At a National Farm Confeder-,
attack, but a resident of the
ation meeting he, characterized"
the demonstrators as "irrational"
and said "at times some enemies
cause confusion, but they cannot
alter the course of our history."
The slogan} "death to Diaz Or-
daz" is seen and heard more and
more in the city, where the dem-
onstrators have been demanding
resignation of the police chief and
release of 86 persons they say are
political prisoners.4
'Shooting, which had been,
heard only once before briefly in
early August, broke out again
Wednesday' in Zocalo, or main
government square, when snipers
started firing on troops who had
occupied 'it.

Heavy battles
resume in war
SAIGON {M)- Spiraling casualty tolls coupled with new
battles northwest of Saigon and below the demilitarized zone
and a dozen Communist barrages against military posts and
towns have dashed hopes among military men of any de-esca-
lation of the ground war in the. near future.
Fresh fighting erupted in Vietnam yesterday and U.S.
lleadquarters said the number of Americans, South Vietna-
mese and Communists killed in combat last week soared to
the highest total so far this summer.

The Viet Cong high command
appealed to its troops and sym-
pathizers in the central part of
the country to "hit, destroy, an-
nihilate the enemy in the new
general offensive now under
way.
In a Vietnamese-1 a n g u a g e
broadcast beamed over Radio
Hanoi, the enemy also told South
Vietnamese officials and soldiers
this was their last chance to
"make retribution.' The broad-
cast urged them to seize allied:
military posts, weapons and "an-
nihilate your criminal leaders."

Presents
INGMAR
BERGMAN'S
TH.E
SEVENT
SEAL'
(1956)
"God is dead or
death is God"
7:Q00& 9:05
Thursday and Friday
ARCHITECTURE AUD.

GUATEMALA'S DEFENSE MINISTER, Col. Pola'ndo Chinchilla, center, confers with police of-
ficers by the covered body of slain U.S. ambassador John Gordon Mein.
SECRET MEETING:
CzechS discuss- troops

Hunt for
assass-ins ~
beginls
GUATEMALA (R) - A left-
wing extremist group claimed yes-
terday its agents tried to kidnap
U.S. Ambassador John Gordon
Mein and gunned him down when
he tried to flee. The group ap-
parently wanted to take Mein
hostage for a prisoner swap.
Guatemalan authorities yesterday
launched a search for at least six

I

i - - - - - -- -- - - - - 1

UNION-LEAGUE

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,_ I -

You need the UAC
Calendar Notebook
Buy it on the Diag
NOW
Freshman Rosters also on sale
on Diag and at Ulrich's

PRAGUE VP) - Liberal and
pro-Moscow communist leaders
argued in secret yesterday over
a party line that might get
the Soviet block occupation for-
ces out of Czechoslovakia. But
there was little hope the troops
would leave soon and gloom
spread over the country.
Josef Smrkovsky, liberal pres-
ident of the National Assembly,
told the nation in a radio ad-
dress that radio and newspapers
will be restricted in ,their free-
dom, as indicated by party chief
Alexander Dubcek earlier this
week. He also said that, in re-
sponse to Soviet demands, polit-
ical clubs will be banned.
Smrkovsky said these meas-
ures will be temporary and will
be discused by the National As-
sembly in the next few days.
Also under Soviet pressure,
claidestine radios were going
off the air. They had sprung
up since the Soviet, Polish, East
German, Hungarian and Bul-

garian troops marched in last
week.
The radios had been under
Soviet attack ever since Presi-
dent Ludvik Svoboda, Dubcek
and other leaders returned this
week from Moscow, where they
were forced to sign an agree-
ment accepting the occupation.
The Russians were irritated be-
cause the Czechoslovak leaders
had not ordered the radios off
the air.
The Communist party meet-
ing was not held at headquar-
ters, which remained unguarded
by Soviet tanks. It probably was
being held at some factory in
Prague's grimy industrial dis-
trict.
At least once since the Soviet
bloc invasion, party leaders put
on overalls and drifted into and
out of a factory when the shifts
changed, to hold secret session.
Soviet tanks stayed off' the,
main thoroughfares, but were
still lined up on side streets.
The Soviet guard was lifted at
the U.S. Embassy, but troops
still guarded such key points'
as radio and newspaper build-,
ings.
Soviet jeeps and armored cars
Patrolled the city's streets.

Dubcek was reported under
medical care, mentally and
physically exhausted. He had
been forcibly taken to Moscow,
where he signed the accord that
accepted the occupation.
Delegates from Slovalk1a were
reported arriving in Prague for
what promised to be a full dress.
meeting of the Czechoslovak
Communist congress, the high-.
est party assembly.
It would have two tasks before'
it: To accept or reject the Mos-
cow agreement and to agree on
the membership of a new party
central committee that would
carry out the new policy.
The. Slovak delegates were
fresh from a party congress at
Bratislava, their regional capi-
tal. Deputy Premier Gustav
Husak, known as a liberal, had
told them: "There were two
possibilities. Those who make
tough radical faces say we
should 'not talk with the oc-
cupying power. What then? We
do not know.
"Other have looked at the
matter soberly and decided that
you can not beat your head
against a wall, This is the only
realistic way out in our situ-
ation.

In beating back Communist of-
fensives lastmweek, headquarters
said, 308 Americans were killed
in action, the highest toll since
June 15. and another 1,144 were
wounded.
South Vietnamese casualties
were put at 495 government troops
slain, their heaviest loss for any
week since May 11.
U.S. headquarters claimed 4,755
North Vietnamese and Viet Cong
killed last week, the biggest
weekly total since May 18.
The rising casualty tolls were
linked directly tovthe resumption
of a series of heavy enemy in-
fantry attacks and shellings that.
began Aug. 18, snapping a two-
month lull in the ground war.
"The offensive efforts of the
enemy were blunted just about
every place he tried to do any-
thing," a U.S spokesman said of
last week's action. He attributed
a large number of Communist
deaths to allied artillery and air
attacks.
The biggest of the new clashes
raged 32 miles northwest of the
capital where U.S. jets and ar-
tillery raked a North Vietnamese
battalion cornered by troops of;
the U.S. 101st Air Cavalry Divi-
sion:

men reported involved in am-
bushing Mein's limousine Wednes-
day on a tree-lined boulevard in
a diplomatic district of the capi-
tal. No arrests were reported.
President Julio Cesar Mendez
Montenegro declared' a state of
siege, suspending some constitu-
tional rights so that police could
make arrests without warrants.
The president also called for
three days of national mournipg.
Fl.gs at all embassies and public
buildings flew at half staff. The
U.S. Embassy was closed. It was
guarded by a Guatemalan soldier.
Memorials services for ,Mein,
54, were scheduled for today at
the Union Presbyterian church
here. Authorities said the b o d y
probably would be flown to the
United States later for burial at
Arlington National Cemetery.

,' ,
M w
l,:
t'1
l ,'
r':

"ANOTHER BERGMAN SMASH FOR STRONG TASTES-AND STRONGER
INTELLECTS! An emotional clobbering. In a dream-like sequence, love7
rmaking begins before assembled erotically posed onlookers. The
imagery builds, the visual pace surges violently. THIS IS A OAZZLER."
-Cue Magazine

hit;
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,
I

11WT TdAI 1IATE

'Ik

1l IVI IVVLM I

to get a great job

at the

"As memorable as anything from Bergman's earlier films. Von Sydow

running his hand over a naked body he believes

to be a corpse, Ingrid

Sheraton Ann Arbor
100 S. Fourth

Thulin's legs gradually appearin~g down from the upper left edge of
the screen as she runs to meet him. It takes great power for an artist

'
I
(

WAITRESSES

to win through."

.IU.S. casualties mount

-N. Y. Times

BUSBOYS

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KITCHEN HELP

III

PEACE-FREEDOM
4:00 P.M.-Rm. 3B, Michigan Union
FRiDAY, AUGUST 30
FIRST ORGANIZING MEETINGS
GARSKOF FOR CONGRESS
NEW POLITICS PARTY
Sponsored by Friends of CNP

CA LL 769-0395
or come to restaurant office

_;

___________ ' II

a

T

I' I

I

Welcome Back

TRYOUT!

to the

good life

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

OMEGA PIZZA

MEN'S GLEE CLUB

"The Hour Of The Wolf"'is the hour between night and dawn. It is the hour when most
people die, when sleep is deepest, when nightmares are most real. It is the hour
when the sleepless are haunted by their deepest fear, when ghosts and demons are
most powerful. "The Hour Of The Wolf" is also the hour when most children are born.

U_

makes it a little better

,#

GENERAL MEETING

I

Tues., Sept. 3, 7:00 P.M.

MAY \l gVllnnAW . I IlIl IMANM

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