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September 17, 1968 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, September 17, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage Deven

F ,

Tigers
By RANDY WISE

clobber

New

York

81,

clinch

pennant tie

/ '

Special to the Daily
DETROIT-The only score the Tigers will care about
tonight is their own against the New York Yankees. They
clinched a tie for the American League pennant last night
with their seventh,,straight win by beating the red hot Yanks
The race could have ended there but Baltimore didn't
comply as they beat the Boston Red Sox, 8-1. As Earl Wilson
(tonight's starting pitcher) said after the game, "We've comei
this far, it's only fitting that we win the pennant by winning
ourselves. I know it will be the biggest start of my career."
The Tigers started off last night just like they finished
Sunday. Dick McAuliffe opened with an infield single. Mickey
Stanley followed with a slows
grounder to third and both ; -r

,.sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
ANDY BARAAS
r ____

*

*

*

*

*

*

Cronin discharges two AL umps
for alleged union activiti~es

runners were safe when short-
stop Gene Michael failed tc
cover second base in time tc
take the throw.
Jim Northrup then knocked ir
his 85th run of the year with a
line single to right.
After Willie. Horton walked
Norm Cash drilled a single up ithe
middle scoring two more runs. Bil]
Freehan ended. Joe Verdanic'%
short stint on the mound with a
single scoring Horton f r o in
second.
Steve Barber then came in and
finished the inning with no fur-
ther damage. But next time out
he encountered a streak of wild-
ness.
He walked McAuliffe and Stan-
ley and then loaded the bases by
hitting Northrup with a pitch. Un-'
corking a wild pitch with iorton
up, he allowed McAuliffe to score.
Hor ton struck .out, but Norm
Cash hit a line shot into the right-
field stands making the score 8-0.
. Freehan got his second straight
hit and Tommy Matchik slammed
a single moving the Tiger catcher
to,,third. He scored on a ground,
out by Wert.
This ended the scoring for the
Tigers and from here on the 28,354
fans just watched the scoreboard
(in dismay), as Baltimore kept
scoring runs.
The Yankees did score their own
run in the ,sixth, but that was
their only threat off John Hiller,
who has beaten New York four
times in his career without a loss.
Mickey Mantle beat out an in-
field hit, took third on Roy
White's double and scored on Bill'
Robinson's sacrifice fly.
New York saw its 10-game win-
ning streak, longest in the majors
this season, come to an end as
The cincher l,
' - ab ritbi
McAuliffe 2b 4 42 2 "
Stanley cf 3 2 0 0
Northrup rf 3 2 2 1
W. Horton if 4 1 1 0
Corner i 0 0 0
Cash ib 5 1 3 5
Freeha °c 5 1 2 1
Matehick ss 4 0 2 0
Wert 3b 40 ,1 1,.
H~ller p . 4 0 0 0
Total 36 9 13 8
NEW: YORK
ab r h hi
Clarke 2b 4 0 3 0
Tresh ss 1 0 0 0
Michael ss 3 0 0
Mantleilb 31 29
Solaita lb 1 0 0 0
White If 41 0 1 0>
W. Robnsn o 3 0 1 1
Rosnorf 49'000
Fernandz c 3 0 0 0
Ferraro 3b 3 0 1 01
Verbanic p 0 0 0 0 .
Barber'p 00 00
k Womack p 1 00 0
Bowserph 0 0 0 0
Talbot p ,1 ,0 '40 0,
Total 31. 1 g 14
New York 000 001 000-v
Detroit 450 000 OOx-9
DP-New York 2, Detroit 3. LOB-
New York 5, Detroit 9. 8B-White,
Cash. 3B-W. Robinson. HR-Cash'
22. SF'-w. Robinson.
i h r er bb so
Vrc L,6- 4 4 4 1
Barber I' j 3 5 5 2'
Womack 2% 2 0 .0 1, 0
Talbot 4 4 '0 0 1- 1
Hiller W, 9-5 9 8 1 1 1 7
BBB-Barber, Northrup WP-Bar-.
ber, Talbot 2. PB-Fernandez. T
2:23. A-28,354.

Orioles maul Iosox,
dela4'y pennant finals,,

CLEVELAND hAP - American
League umpires Al Salerno and
William Valentine were fired yes-
terday by League President Joe
Cronin and Valentine said it was
because they tried to organize an
American League, umpires' asso-
clation.
"There's no doubt that we were
released from our jobs because of
our activities," Valentine said at
a news conference.
Salerno added: "I don't care if
I never umpire another game .. .
It's very important that this be
brought into the open and I hope
it will improve conditions for
other umpires."
In Boston, Bob Holbrook, ex-!
ecutive assistant to Cronin, con-
firmed that both men had been
released and both have been paid
for the remainder of the season,
along with severance pay.

The league did not confirm that
Salerno and Valentine were fired
for organizational activities.
Valentine also said all 40 major
league umpires are organizing into
one group. The National League
umpires already are in the Na-
tional League Umpires Associa-
tion.
Salerno and Valentine said they
went to Chicago last Friday to
attend the National League Um-
piree Association meeting and to
sound out their counterparts on
the idea of a similar organization
in the American League.
Valentine said the National
Leaguers were very receptive.
It was at the Chicago meeting
that the umpires decided to have
one group instead of one in each
league, Valentine said.
Valentine said cards then were
sent to the 20 American League

umpires asking each man for au-
thorization to be represented by
the new association.
"We have a majority already,"
Valentine said, adding that all
cards haven't been been returned
yet. "We had a majority before
we even went to Chicago," he
added.
Valentine said he and Salerno
were notified within five minutes
of each other that they were
fired.
"Cronin told Salerno he would
give him 10 days severance pay,"
Valentine said. "He told me I
would get 30 days severance."
The two umpires were in Cleve-
land for Tuesday night's game be-
tween the Indians and Washing-
ton Senators. The two others in
the crew are Emmett Ashford and
Jim Honochick.

By The Associates Press
BOSTON 'Don Buford belted
a grand slam homer and Brooks
Robinson and Boog Potell con-
tribut'ed solo shots as the Balti-
moreOrioles delayed I~etroit's
American League 'pennant cele-
bration last night with an 8-1 vic-
tory over the Boston Red Sox.
Buford, who also had a pair of
singles, nailed down the. victory
for right-hander Tom Phoebus
with his 15th homer, a line shot
with the bases loaded capping 'a
five-run fourth against Boston
starter Jim Lonborg.
Carl Yastrzemski, keeping' his
average above .300 in a bid for a
second straight batting title,
singled home a Boston run in the
first.
Brooks Robinson tied the count
with his 16th homer in the secs}
ond. He added a single in the
decisive fourth and a double 'in a
two run fifth.
Rick Renick led off the ninth
ining with a home run against
Sammy Ellis, giving the Minnesota
Twins a 4-3 victory over Califor-
nia yesterday.
The Twins spotted the Angeles
three unearned runs on Jackie
Hernandez' two errors in the

fourth inning, then rallied to tie
with three in the eighth.,
George Brunet blanked the
Twins on six singles until the
eightha when a walk and Cesar
Tovar's double scored a run and
'finished him. The Twins went on
to tie as Tovar scored on a wild
pitch by reliever Marty Pattin,
Carew tripled him home.
*. * *
SAN FRANCISCO - Willie Mc-
Covey drove in four runs, half of
them with a seventh inning double
that keyed a five-run rally and
led the San Francisco Giants to
an 8-4 victory over Cincinnati.
McCovey's RBI spree, before a'
turnout of 2,316-lowest in the
Giants' San Francisco history-
carried him intos a tie for the Na-
tional League lead with Chicago's
Billy Williams at 97 apiece.
* * *
PHILADELPHIA - R o o k i e
Dock Ellis hurled a three-hitter
for his first complete game and
Donn Clendenon dove in two runs
with a single andl his 16th home1
run as Pittsburgh beat Philadel-
phia 6-1 last night.
The Pirates jumped on starter
Rick Wise for two runs in the first
inning on singles by Gene Alley,
Matty Alou, Roberto Clemente and
Clendenon.

NEW YORK YANKEE second baseman, Horace Clark, was caught
off balance after a collision with Tiger Dick McAuliffe (24) in
the first inning. McAuliffe was called safe after Mickey Stanley's
infield grounder was mishandled, and went on to score the first
Detroit run in the 8-1 rout. The Tigers, having clinche a tie
for the pennant, need only their own win tonight, or Baltimore's
loss to sent them to the World Series.

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Detroit
Baltimore
New York
Cleveland
Boston
Oakland
Minnesota
California
Chicago
Washington

97
87
80
81
79
76
72
65
62
58

.54
65
71
72
72
79
87
89
93

.642
.572
.530
.529
.523
.503
.477
.428
.411
.384

10, 2
17
17
18
21
25
32/
35
39

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Minnesota 4,California 3
Detroit 9, New York 1
Baltimore 8, Boston 1
only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
California at Minnesota
Oakland at Chicago, night
New York at Detroit, night
Washington at Cleveland, night
Baltimore at Boston, night

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
St. Louis 93 558 .616 -
San Francisco 81 70 .536 12
Cincinnati , 78 71 .523 14
Chicago 78 74 .513 15%
xAtlanta 76 74 .507 161/2~
Pittsburgh 74 76 .493 182
Philadelphia 71 80 .477 22
xLos Angeles 68 82 .453 242r2
Houston 67 84 .444 26
New York 67 84 .444 26
x-Late game not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 8, Cincinnati 4
Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia I
Atlanta at Los Angeles, inc.
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at New York, night
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, night
Atlanta at Houston, night
Cincinnati at Los Angeles, night
St. Louis at San Francisco, night

' , - - -

LARGE TURNOUT:
Frosh offense gears for pass attack

By JOE MARKER
For a college football player, the
freshman year may be the most
unrewarding, since his efforts go
largely unnoticed by the sports
community. The life to Which he
had been accustomed, oneIof glo-
rious press clippings and All-
State honors, evaporates into an
anonymity which can blunt the
enthusiasm of any player, but es-
pecially that of an offensive back,
who is used to receiving the great-
est amount of attention.'
However, no such lack of in-
terest seemed, present as coach
Bill Dodd's freshman took to the
Ferry Field practice gridirons last
week. Coach Dodd, 'ot one given
to overstatement, was "very im-
pressed with the enthusiasm." In
fact, 59 candidates showed up for
practice (substantially more than
last year), of whom 17 are vying
for spots in the backfield,
As with the other backfield po-
sitions, the battle for the quarter-
back slot is wide open, since prac-
tice-in-earnest began only " last
week. Bruce Elliott, son of former
Illinois head coach Pete Elliott, is
given a good shot at the post. A
six-footer southpaw with good
speed and an ability to cut quick-
ly, hestarred as a defensive back
in his high school days..

Other candidates for this posi-
tion, all tall, rangy men, include
Bill Ross, 6'3" from Beaver Falls,
Pa. the home of Lord Namath),
DInnis Connell (6'2" from Chi-
cago), and Richard Lindenfield
(6'2" from St. Joseph, Mich.). All
four have the ability to spot re-
ceivers from the roll-out pattern
popularized by Bennis Brown last
season.
The flanker position appears to
be the strongest, with any of three
men , considered more than ade-
quate. Glenn Doughty comes out
of Detroit with a "good speed,
good catch" label, which is about
all that's needed at this post.
However, he should have strong
competition from Tom Darden
(Sandusky. Ohio) and Al Car-
penter, a 203 pounder from Flint.
All three are tall at 6'2" and
should provide the quarterback
with good targets.
As in the case of the other posi-
tions, no one yet has claimed the
tailback slot. Frank Gusich comes
from Garfield Heights, Ohio (a
suburb of Cleveland) with impres-
sive credentials.-"He will be hard-
pressed by Dave Zuccarelli, a Chi-
cago teammate of Dennis Connell,
and Bill Taylor, another of Mich-,
igan's numerous recruits from the
Buckeye state. A dark-horse in
the running is Preston Henry from
Flint, who "has looked real good
the last couple of days," according
to Coach Dodd.
the only real sore spot in the
backfield is at fullback, since noa
one ,was recruited for the job.
Several players have been tried
here, but the staff is still looking
for the right man. Randy Matti-
yow, a 230 pound bruiser from
Roseville, Mich., has been con-.
verted from the tight end position.

He has good speed for a man his#
size, and at 6'5' should be able to
gain short yardage by merely fall-,
ing forward.
Others paraded in include Fritz
Seyforth, Mike Bonnette, Dana
Coin, and Therlon Harris, who in-
cidentally scored a second in the
state high school wrestling tour-
nament while at Ypsilanti.
It appears that the Frosh this
year may have to lean heavily on
their passing attack, because of
the lack of a strong running game.
If no one plugs the hole at full-
back, the offensive unit could be
in for a rough year with oppo-
nents keying their defensesnto the
passing attack.t
Another bugaboo, which could]
decimate the offense is injuries,;
for the Wolverines lack depth in
the backfield, especially at tail-:
back and fullback.
In any case the burden of mov-
ing the team will weigh heavily
on the shoulders of the quarter-
back, as there doesn't appear to
be a young O. J. Simpson or Leroy
Keyes to keep the defenses honest.

Coeds:,
"Let us style a
FLATTERING HAIR CUT
to your individual needs."
-no appointment needed
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre
PART TIME
WORK AVAILABLE
Custodial Positions
-4 hours per day
-afternoon or evening
--5 day week
General custodial work
in modern, clean light
manufacturing' plant.
Please apply in person
between 8 A.M.-4 P.M.
XEROX
UNIVERSITY MICROFILM
300 N. ZEEB RD.
Ann Arbor, Mich.
An equal opportunity employer
male and female.

I

jT
PETI TIONING
4
COUNCILI -;
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 25, 1968
-j
Pick Up Petitions
outside JJC office
SAB

Professional Standings

STUDENTS
FOR
NIXON,
2542 SAB
663-9088

Enjoy Yourself
Join The Daily Staff

'B
N
H
B

AMERICAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Eastern Division
tostoni 1 0 .0 1.000
ew York 1 0 0 1.000
ouston 1 1 0 .500:
iamni 0 1 0 .000
uffalo 0 2 0 .000"
'Western Division
W L T Pct."
iakland 1, 0 0 1.000
an Diego 1 0 01.000
ransas City1 1 0 .500
ncinnati 1 '1x 0 .500
Denver 0 1 0 .000
WV L T Pct.

Cleveland
New Orle
Pittsburg
St. Louis

Century Division
1 0 0
ans 0 1 0
h 0 1 '

0 00

Coastal Division

Oa
sa
Ka
Cil

Baltimore
Los Angeles
San Francisco
Atlanta.

1
0
0

0 0
0 0
1,0
10&

1.000
.000
.000
.000
1.000
.000
.000
.000
1.000
1.000
.000
.000

Diag

Fishbowl

ALL PROSPECTIVE RUSH EES

SATURDAY'S RESUL=TS
Houston 24, Miamil 10K
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
r New York 20, Kansas City 19
Oakland 48, Buffalo 6
Cincinnati 24, Denver 10
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Eastern Conference
Capitol Division
W L T Pct.
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000
New York 1 0 0 1.000
Washington 1 0 0 1.00
Philadelphia o 1 0 .000

Central Division
Minnesota' 1 0 0
Green Bay 1 0 0
Chicago 0 1 ,
Detroit 0 1.0
Minnesota 47, Atlanta 7

Sunday's Results
New York 34, Pittsburgh 20
Cleveland 24, New Orleans 10
Dallas 59, Detroit 13
Green Bay 30, Philadelphia 13
Baltimore 27, San Francisco 10
Washington 38, Chicago 28
Yesterday's Results
Los 'Angeles at St. Louis, inc.

OPENINGS FOR MALE
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Work-Experience Opportunity with Emotionally
Disturbed Children.
Hawthorn Center offers mature students a unique
opportunity to work directly with disturbed children
in a creative, well-supervised, in-patient treatment
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Hours: 32 or 40 per week. Must be able to work
days and weekends.
Potential openings on evenings and.midnight shift.
Age Requirement: Minimum-20 years.

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CHARGE IT!
" PRESCRIPTIONS
- PCOSMETICS
e gOMEN'S
TOILETRI ES-
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