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September 17, 1968 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-17

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 17, 1968

Pg.ihHEMCIA ALYTedy etebr1,16

I

AD HOC GROUP:
Committees consider reforms
in curricula of literary college

New protests open at Columbia

By MICHAEL THORYN
Several committees concerned
with academic reform in the liter-
ary college are involved in the first
step to success-talk.
An informal group with no set
membership, the Committee for
Academic Reform discussed dis-,
tribution requirements, especially
language requirements, and var-
ious methods of organization at
a meeting Sunday.
Other student committees con-
cerned with the academic issue
are a group studying the possibil-
ity of ah interdepartmental de-
partment. This groulp is headed by
SGC at large member Gayle Ru-
bin, '71.
Another group, headed by SGC
member Panther White, '69, is
concerned with the psychology
outreach program, as well as the
literary college and Honors steer-
ing committees.
Some of the impetus for reform
came from Michael Rossman, a
_ traveling emissary for educational
reform who ran workshops here on
Sept. 2-4. SGC paid him $150
for his efforts.
Interested students did little

with their new resolve during the
next weeks because of a similar
deep commitment in the continu-
ing problems of Ann Arbor wel-
fare mothers.
Mark Hodax, '70, a member of
the ad hoc Committee for Aca-
demic Reform said, "I want to see
students expending energy in ef-
forts meaningful to them."
Bob Neff, '69 executive v i c e -
president of SGC urged the group
"to get at gut-issues. Try -to get
rid of the language requirement
or get it on pass-fail," Neff said.
Two years of language study or
a tested equivalent are required
of literary .college students.
A small language study com-
mittee will be talking to depart-
ment chairmen and will attempt
to gather more student support. A
meeting is scheduled for 4 p.m.
Wednesday at the SAB.
Members described their lang-
uage experience, largely in French
and Spanish, as "time-consum-
ing, "busy work," and "'iot worth
studying."
One student said, "Languages
are used to weed out underclass-
men who don't want to study."
Michael Koeneke, president of
SGC, noting the diffuse nature

of the reform groups, said, "Coun-
cil will set up a central meeting
place."
"I'm not going to pick a chair-
man," Koeneke continued. "SGC
will try to stimulate the ad hoc
committees."
Koeneke is working with the
language requirement committee.
Recognizing stident interest in
academic reform, the history de-
partment is sponsoring an o p e n
forum for students in history, Fri-
day at 1 p.m. in the Rackham
amphitheater.
William Willcox, chairman of
the department said "the foruml
is completely unstructured.'It's a
voluntary get-together."
Several faculty members will
attend. Willcox said the forum
"could possibly set up a steering
committee."
A reform committee member
considered the current activity
and said, "There's a lot of things
happening. Things haven't jelled
yet."

(Continued from Page 1)
but said all would get a fair
hearing.
Earlier in the year, when stu-
dents were called to disciplin-
ary hearings before deans, sev-
eral campus leaders of the re-
volt refused to appear or to rec-
ognize the authority of the uni-
versity to discipline them. Many
campus leaders and faculty
members have called for amnes-
ty for everyone involved in the,
disorders.
At a faculty meeting 1 a s t
Thursday, a resolution asking
for total amnesty was defeated,
reportedly by a vote of 240 to
160.
The meeting was preceded by
an attempt of about 200 stu-
dents to forge their way into the
closed room. There was no vio-
lence, only pushing and shoving,
until the door was locked and
the stuiidnts left.
T h e faculty meeting passed
new rules governing peaceful
demonstrations on the campus.
Prof. Michael Sovern, chairman
of the faculty executive com-
mittee, said the new ruls will

provide wide latitude for picket-
ing and protest, but include dis-
cipline to prevent disruption of
of campus life.
The previously-illegal indoor
protests were okayed, but vio-
lence, loud noise, force, blocking
doorways, mass, invasions of of-
fices and other disruptions were
outlawed. The university presi-
d e n t is required to consult a
faculty committee before he
calls police; protesters must be
notified if police are to be used.
Infractions of the rule will be
punishable by measures ranging
from disciplinary probation to
expulsion. Appeal mechanisms
are provided. Those arrested by
police will be subject to suspen-
sion.
Indications are that the radi-
cal leaders will not be satisfied
with the new rules or with in-
clusion of students on university
governing boards. Last week a
majority of 150 to 200 students
attending closed SDS meetings
reportedly favored an immediate
beginning of strike activity and
renewed student demand for
amnesty.

Those at the meetings report-
edly agreed to pursue these
goals:
-Expansion of t h e student
strike to involve people of the
local community such as high
school students and Puerto Ri-
can and, Negro residents. Co-
lumbia is adjacent to Harlem.
- Better housing for tenants
of apartment buildings owned
by Columbia and the exposure
of "institutional racism" in
housing.
- A minimum wage of $110 a
week for all university em--
ployes.
- And end to all "war re-
search" on campus.
- Abolishment of the School
for International Affairs, of
which Cordier is dean, the Na-
v a 1 Reserve Officers Training
Corps and all ties with the In-
stitute for Defense Analyses.
- Guarantees that there will
be no fines, jail terms or repris-
als against those students ar-
rested.
The spring protests and sit-
ins began with complaints by

students against university con-
struction of a gymnasium, The
The protesters argued that it
encroached on Harlem. They al-
so objected to university links
to the IDA.
The gym construction has
been halted and Columbia has
severed its institutional ties
with IDA although individuals
from the school still work for it.
These issues, however, be-
came submerged into more fun-
damental criticism of the struc-
ture and operation of the uni-
versity.
Another student activity that
could affect the reopening is an
International Assembly of Stu-
dent Movements scheduled for
Sept. 18 through Sept. 24 or 25.
Meetingk are to take place at
Columbia and New York Uni-
versity.
SDS, which is running the as-
sembly, says the purpose is to
gain an understanding of the
various s t u d e n t movements
around the world.
Groups ; are expected, SDS
says, from Canada, France,
West Germany, England, Spain,

Italy and possibly others. de-
pending on finances.
Columbia's school year ended
in chaos last spring following
clashes that involved adminis-
tration, students, faculty and
New York City police.
A sit-in that began April 23
spread, and students quickly oc-
cupied five campus buildings.
Eight days later, 1,000 city po-
lice cleared the buildings and
arrested more than 700 persons,
There were dnearly 200 injured.
Some students a n d faculty,
outraged over the use of police
force, supported the strike.
Formal classes ended.
Three weeks later, another
demonstration was held, to pro-
test the suspension of leaders of
the earlier protest. Columbia
President Grayson Kirk called
in the police early the n e x t
morning, May 22.
More than 100 arrests were
made without incident at first,
but rows of helmeted policemen
swept across the campus. Stu-
dents tosse'd bricks. Several po-
li'cemen were seriously injured
and nearly '100 students were
clubbed.

s

- _ _

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
Jai responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITER form to
Room 3528 L. S. & A. Bldg., be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
" Student organization notices are not
Saccepted forpublication. For more
Information call 764-9270.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
Day Calendar
School of Music. Recital: Students of
e'String Department: School of Music
Recital Hall, 3:45 p.m.
Department of History Lecture: Keith
Hopkins, Professor, University of Hong
Kong, "Sociological Methods and An-
cient History": 110 Physics-Astronomy
,Building, 4:10 p.m. I
Center for Russian and East Euro-
pean Studies Lecture: Gyorgy Ranki,
Deputy Director, Institute of History,
Hungarian Academy of Science, "The
Industrial Revolution in Eastern Europe
Before World War I", 4:10 p.m., Tues-
day, September 17, 1968, 200 Lane Hall.
&'inema Guild: Sith Ann Arbor Fes-
tival. Winners and Highlights: Archi-
tectural Auditorium, 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
Department of Psychiatry, Lecture:
Juistin Call, M.D., University of Cal-
Tornia, "Play and Related Phenomena
in the Development of the Mind," 7:30
p.m., CPH Auditorium.
Professional Theatre Program: Mo-
liere's The Misanthrope: Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
School of Music Program of 17th and
18th Century Music: String Orchestra-
Gilert Ross, Conductor; Darwyn Apple,
Violinist; Margaret Moores, Cellist:
Rackham Lecture Hall, 8:00 p.m.,
General Notices
Applications, for U. S. Government,
Scholarships for 1969-70 finder the Ful-
bright-Hays Act-: Must be completed
and filed with the Graduate Fellowship
Office, 1014 Rackham Building, by
October 7, 1968. Under the Fulbright
program, over 900 American graduate
students will have an opportunity to
study in any one of 50 countries for
one year. Candidates who wish to apply
for an award must be U S. citizens at
the time of application, have a Each-
elor's -Degree or its equivalent by the
beginning date of the grant, and in
most cases, be proficient in the lang-
uage of the host country. Selections
will be made on the basis of academic
record, the feasibility of the appli-
cant's proposed study plan and per-
sonal qualifications. Preference is giv-
en to candidates who have not had
prior extended study or residence
abroad, and who are under the age of
35. Application forms and information
for students currently enrolled at the
University of Michigan may be obtain-
ed from the 'Graduate Fellowship Of-
fice, 1014 Rackham. Deadline for filing
completed applications is October 7,
1968. Qualified and interested pro-
cedures may be completed by the dead-
line. If you have any questions regard-
ing this announcement, please call
764-2218.
Fall Term Fees: At least 50 is due
and payable on or before September
30, 1968.
Non paymeifl of at least 50% by
September 30 will result in the assess-
ment of a Delinquent penalty of $5.00.
Payments may be made in person or
mailed to the Cashier's Oftice, 1015
L.S.A. Building, before 4:30 p.m. Mon-
day, September 30, 1968.
MAIL EARLY
Mail payments postmarked after due
date, September 30, 1968, are late and
subject to penalty.
Identify mail payments as tuition
and show complete ten-digit student
number and name.
Broadcasting Service: Radio Station
WUOM-FM (91.7 M.) 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.
daily. Tuesday, 1.00 pm The Next Fifty
Years-"The Future American Society,
Part II", with Richard L. Cutler and
James Rouse. Wednesday, 11:00 a.m.
The Eleventh Hour (repeated at 7 p.m.)
Ed Burrow hosts an hour of news and
conversation about the arts and liter-
ature. Special guests: Stephen Porter,
director of APA production of "The
Misanthrope"; Quentin Fiore, designer
for U-M Press. Wednesday, 1:00 p.m.
Selective Service Seminar: The At-
torney's View - James T. Lafferty,
Project Coordinator, Detroit Neighbor-
hood Legal Services, on "Conscientious
Objection and Selective Objection". An
Institute of Continuing . Legal Educa-
tion Seminar.
Students in the School of Nursing
may sign up for pre-classification time

on Tuesday, September 17 at 1:30 p.m.
in Room 4000 U.H.S., Chairman: D. K.
Byrn.
Foreign Visitors
The following individuals can be
reached through the Foreign Visitor
Division of the Visitor and Guest Re-
lations Ofice, Rooms 22-24, Michigan
Union Telephone: 764-2148.
Dr. Toshijiro Kawamura; President,
University of Hiroshima, Hiroshima,
Japan. September 15-22.
Mr. Johanne Rau:Member, Federal
Executive Board, Social Democratic
Party.,Dusseldorf, West Germany.'Sep-
tember 15-17.
6Dr. Jose Esquinal: Director, Children's
Hspital, Panama City, Panama. Sep-
tember 18-21.,f
Placement
3200 S. A. B.
GENERAL DIVISION
Placement Services Registration
Meetings: To acquaint students, under-
graduate and graduate, with Placement
Services. Explanations of aids in ca-
reer planning from the counseling, de-
cision making stages, through inter-
viewing, application, and final accept-
ance of the position. All areas of the
Services will be represented, General
Placement, Teacher Placement, Sum-
mner Placement, and CareerCounseling.
Tuesday, September 17, 196. 3:00 and
4:00 meetings. Auditorium D, Angell
Hall. All members of the University
Community welcome. Get started on
this all important task early, let place-
ment Services help you.
Placement interviews: The following
organizations will interview at Place-
ment Services, the representatives ex-
pect to see at least a vita sheet on
interviewees, therefore, if you are not -
already, registered with the General Di-
vision, please stop in and let us provide
you with the proper materials. Please
call 763-1363 to make appointments by
phone, or stop in and make appt. in
person. Make appts, as soon as possible,
none accepted after 4 p.m. day preced-
ing visit.
Thursday, September 19, 1963: U. S.
Air Force--All graduates, at all levels,
men only, Sept. 19 and 20, for Officer
Programs In all areas, most interested
in pilot and navigation areas.
Friday, September 20, 1968: U.S. Air
Force, see Tues. and Thurs. listing
above.
LISTINGS AT OTHER OFFICES
Tuesday and Wednesday, September
24 and 25, 1968: U. S. Air Force inter-
views at Bus. Admin. Placement Of-
fices, 271 Bus. Ad. Call 764-1372 for
appts and further information: Women
for officers interviewed on Sept. 25.
Men for Pilots and navigators primar-
ily on Sept. 24.
INTERVIEWS THE WEEK OF
SEPTEMBER 23 THROUGH 27:
Monday, September 23, 1968: U. S.
Marines - men and women for Marine
Corps Officer Programs, all degree lev-
els, any major, April, and June grad-
uates.
Tuesday, September 24, 1968: U. S.
Marines, see Mon. listing above.
Wednesday, September 25, 1968: U. S.
Marines, See Mon. listing above.
Thursday, and Friday, September 26
and 27, 1968: No interviews presently
scheduled at placement services 3200
S.A.B.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT SERVICE
128 H, West Engrg. Bldg.
Engineering Placement Meeting No. 2.
"Engineering Careers." The different
kinds of careers for engineers, and how
to decide which you should follow.
Second of four meetings. Primarily for
seniors and graduat students, but open
to all interested. Professor J. G. Young,
September 17, 4:00 pm and 7:30 p.m.
in Room 311, West Engineering Build-
ing. (Afternoon and evening meetings
wil be the same.)
Make interview appointment at Room
128 H, Wst Engrg. Bldg, unless other
wise specified.
September 23 and 24, 1968: Texas In-
struments, Inc. Equipment Group, Dal-
las and Houston, Texas.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
UM Scottish Country Dance Society.
Dance meeting Weds., 8:00 - 10:30 p.m
WAB Lounge Instruction given - be-
ginners welcome.

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Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill Street,
Daily Minyin (services), Sundays, 8:00
a.m. and 7:00 p.m, Mondays through
Thurs., 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.; Fridays,
7:00 a.m. and 6:15 p.m.
Bach Club Meeting, Thurs.. Sept.
19th, 8:00 p.m. Guild House, 802 Monroe
St. Program: election of officers for fall

.

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