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September 17, 1968 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-17

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Page Six

t

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 17, 1968

Pae.-.HEMCHGNyAL

: ~

IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO ALL
YOUNG DEMOCRATS
A SPEC IAL'MEMBERSHIP MEET-
I NG w il l be held Tuesday, Sept.
17, '8 P.M. in UGLI Multipurpose
Room, to consider an Executive1
Board resolution on the advisabil-
ity of Young Democrat participa-
tioh in the national Presidential
campaign. Only paid members will
be allowed to vote.
(signed) Cecily S. Becker
President
INN
OGGO
BAHAMAS
10 FABULOUS DAYS
9 GLORIOUS NIGHTS
$1900
Dec. 26th-Jan. 4th
INCLUDES:
* Round trip jet air fare
0 9 Nights accommoda-
tions at the famous
Freeport Inn
0 9 Great happy hours
PLUS, PLUS, PLUS
$50 Holds Your Reservations
CALL:
Your Campus Representative
DICK RINI, 769-0226
or
STUDENTOURS, 886-0844

Harris, Imsland vie for split slot;
Mandich holds grip on tight end

By DIANA ROMANCHUK
Two years ago Jack Clancy, All-
America split end graduated.
One year ago his successor, Jim
Berline, made all-conference hon-
ors and likewise graduated.
Having neither a Clancy or a
Berlines this season, Michigan's
fortunes at split end depend on
two untried juniors, Bill Harris
and Jerry Imsland.
According to offensive end
coach George Mans, the two have
been neck and neck for the start-
ing spot. "But," he added, "their
experience is zero."
Harris missed much of last sea-
son on injuries, but the 6'1" end
from Mount Clemens grabbed
four passes in the final intra-
squad game last spring for 60
yards.
Imsland, also 6'1", is new to the
position. A transfer student from
Kentucky, he backed Jim Man-
dich at tight end last spring. At
fall practice, however, he was
moved over to his present spot.
His success at making a smooth
transition will probably earn him
the starting nod, but even so,
Harris is sure to see him share of
the action.I
Experience, though, is no prob-
lem at the tight end and flanker
spots.
Tight end rests firmly in the
hands of Jim Mandich. Last year,
as a sophomore, the 63" end
started every week, coming on
stronger as the season ended fin-
ishing eighth in Big Teti pass re-
ceiving.
In the Illinois game, for ,exam-
ple, he grabbed four passes for,
34 yards besides acting as key'

blocker. "He stands on the thres-
hold of being great," Mans fore-
sees, "He has both the physical
qualifications and the attitude."
Backing him is Fike Hankwitz,
the junior who will also double as
Michigan's kick-off man. He is
backson the offensive unit after
a season at linebacker.
"He was a tight end in his
freshman year," Mans "explains,
"but we needed linebackers so
that's where he played last season.
Now that there are several new
sophomore linebackers and Ims-
land has moved over to split end,
he has returned to that position."
When scrambler Denny Brown,
decides to throw, his third target
will be flanker John Gabler. Last
year the 6'2" junior snagged 20
passes for 175 yards and 12th'
place in conference rankings. His
25 yards rushing will no doubt be
improved- upon by his 25-pound
weight loss.
The greatest advantage, as
Mans points out, in having a third
receiver is "using him as a threat
to confront the opposition de-
fense."
His back-up men are described
by Mans as "dead equal." Dave
Farabee, a senior has been moved
around considerably, gaining ex-
perience as both an offensive and
defensive back.
Paul Staroba is a sophomore,
but did not play freshman foot-
ball. Now on tenure, he is im-
proving steadily, making 'up for
the year of football he missed.
Mans sizes his unit up as one
of "inexperienced depth' but,
would prefer one experienced in
depth.

Coaches
By JEFF LISS cord. E
Around the Big Ten, coaching champi
philosophies come in - various titles,
shapes i as n
shapes and sizes. However, all but tion,h
one of the coaches agree on one Big Te
point - Jack Mollenkopf is pub- isi n
lic enemy number one. wins ir
The other jealous nine pointed STROIS
their fingers at the Purdue mentor Althc
as the coach of the team they for hi
would most like to crush. yardss
Few other similarities can be teamsh
found among the Big Ten coaches. tablish
There are defensive geniuses and pasn
offensive whizzes; experienced cords,
leaders and green rookies; men standai
who own a lock on their jobs and No n
others whose holds are slipping. was su
The man in the most enviable success
position, in terms of past achieve- Pont. 1
ments and current prospects, is Hoosie
Ohio State's Woody Hayes. After insure
I 17 years in Columbus, Hayes has also.
compiled an amazing 107-41 re- Pont

key on

BIG TEN REVIEWED

Mollenlkopf

He's captured two national
ionships, four conference
and two Rose Bowl victories
many appearances. In addi-
is 1954-1956 teams set the.
n record of 17 conference
n a row.
NG OFFENSE
ough Hayes is mainly noted
sgrind-it-out style-I.("three
and a cloud of dust") his
through the years have es-
ed nearly all of Ohio State's
g and pas sreceiving re-
in addition to the running
rds.
natter what he says, no one
arprised more by Indiana's
last year than Coach John
Pont's role in bringing the
rs from rags to roses should
his job for quite a while,
is a revisionist as college

JIM MANDICH

SOUTHERN INDEPENDENTS

Gators, H!p'ricanes lead southern' revival

1963. compiling a two-year record
of 12-5-1. Te was invited to re-
peat the feat at Indiana in 1965.
coaches go. He revived a faltering
Yale team when he took over in
but he didn't succeed until last
year.
Mollenkopf the villian, is used
to being envied. In eleven years of
coaching, his Purdue teams have
finished out of the first division
only once. His overall record
stands at 68-35-9.
Minnesota's Murray Warmath
has led his squad through thick
and thin for fourteen years, com-
piling a 70-56-5. record 'along the
way.
In 1960, he followed up a last
place Big Ten finish with a na-
tional championship. He has
coached two Gopher Rose Bowl
appearances, splitting the decis-
ions.
Warmath is basically a "con-
tact" man, in that he emphasizes
hard hitting and hard work over
any specific football philosophy.
OPTIMISTIC IOWA,.
Ray Nagel is an optimistic man.
As coach at Iowa, he had better be
optimistic. Since taking over the
Hawkeyes in 1966, Nagel's record
has been a disappointing 3-16-1.
Hired to pull off a rebuilding job
similar to the revival he led at
Utah (1958-1965), Nagel believes
this year may produce his first
successful showing.
Everyone knows that Michigan
State's Duffy Daugherty is witty,
jovial, frank, droll, and jolly.
That's his image.
His Spartan teams, which al-'
most always seem to boast Spar-
tan-like defenses, have played to
a 85-42-4 pace. Undoubtedly,
Daugherty's high water mark to
date came in 1965 and 1966, when
he coached two straight undefeat-
ed national champions.
Duffy will never have to worry
about his job. All he need do is
break up the boys and the Board
of Trustees each year in his jovial;
witty, droll, and jolly style. They
need someone to keep them smil-
ing.

JOHN PONT
Ara Parseghian is a tough act
to 'follow, but that's what Alex
Agase had to do. Agase took over
for Parseghian at Northwestern
in 1963, when Ara moved to Notre
Dame. Since then, he has mnolded
a 13-25-1 overall record.

By JOE CHIESA
The Civil War ended over a
century ago, but the clamor over
Southern independents continues
into the '68 season.
With an independent's role is
primarily one of antagonist,
Miami and IForida St. appear to
be chief Southern tormentors on
the gridiron this year.
Charlie Tate's Miami Hurri-
canes will start seventeen letter-
men. The offense will be spear-
headed by signal caller Dave
Olivo, a pinpoint passer, who often
ventures from the pocket a la

back. Florida State went to the
airways almost 70% of the time
last year, Ron Sellers (70 catches,
1228 yards) being the primary
reason.
Tom Bailey and Bill Gunter
provide the running punch when
called upon, presumable not t o o
often. The offensive line is well
manned and will give enough time
td whomever coach Bill Peterson
chooses to throw the ball.
The defense contains a plethora
of returnees, led by linebacker
Dale McCullers, touted for All-
American ratings, as is everyone

The line headed by Captain
Howard Moore is far from im-
mense. Tulane's defense generally
is very small and very young. An
easier schedule offers little conso-
lation to coach Jim Pittman.
Coach Pie Vann's Southern
Missippi team is a good one. Van
Mississippi team is a good one.
Vann is a stickler for' funda-
mentals -and his team is funda-
mentally sound. The offense is
well balanced and deep, featuring
running backs Johnsohn and
Johnston. The defense has the
size, the speed, and the Barney.
Rex Barney at 250 pounds is an
awesome middle guard.
Chattanooga and Tampa boast
of 26 and 33 returning lettermen
respectively. Chattanooga is now
a part of, the University of
Tennessee and should improve on
its seven and three record of last
year. Tampa has a new stadium
and a new coach. Beware y'all.

Agse's forte is his knowledge of
and ability to develop defensive
lines. His two greatest highlights
as Wildcat coach were both de-
fensive gems -.both upsets over
Illinois (35-7) in 1966, and Miami
(12-7) in 1967.

1

Fran Tarkenton.
Olivo's running backs, Vince :si ::;::
Opalsky and John Acuff, strike NATIONAL
fear and pain in the hearts and
bodies of enemy defenses, having
amasnsed over 1100 gards in'67. OUTLOOKI

The well balancd attack is an-
chored by a veterans offensive
line.
The Hurricane's defense is
mammoth and seasoned. Ted
Hendricks, twice All-American, is
a fixture at defensive end. The
corps of linebackers is solid.
Miami's only weakness may be in
the secondary. .
Southern Cal and the Crimson
Tide of Alabama are included in
the Hurricanes' schedule this
season, but Miami's balance and
experience should place them
high in the polls.
Florida State should again at-
tain national recognition.. Letter-
men number 21 of 22 regulars.
Kim Hammond's departure, how-
ever, creates a void at quarter-

else who currntly slaps on a jer-
sey. The front four are small by
Big Ten standards, but fleet.
Just across ;the state line the
situation is deemed far f r o m
promising. Georgia Tech partisans
can look forward to another lean,
year. The, loss of superback Lenny
Snow, Kim King, and fourteen
other seniors sends a host of sophs
to the front lines. Coach Bud
Carson in his second year has re-
vamped the passing attack, now
featuring quarterback Larry Good
and received John Sias. Sias is
good; Good unproven.
A few holes will be opened in
the interior line, but someone
must be found to use them. In
'67 Tech's porous defense provid-
ed ample opportunity for opposing
forces yielding 205 points.
Although the Yellowjackets de-
fense gained some experience last
season, middle linebacker Earl
Wilcox is the only standout, the
others may "stand out". Georgia
Tech's schedule is a grim one with
Miami and, Notre Dame. "The
Snow" is gone but it will be a
long cold winter in Atlanta.
Tulane and Southern Missis-
sippi have contrasting years
ahead. The Green Wave of Tulane
is indeed green. One of the few
offensive threats of the Tulane
aggregation is hard running full-
back Warren Bankston. The
quarterback spot as several others
is up for grabs.

I

Gridde Pikigj
Yatta yatta.
Oh boy.
Whee.
It's all about to happen on these, the wonderful topical, exciting
Daily sports pages, the pages of the newspaper that break little
girls' hearts, make large, burly men weep, and send sensitive oafs
packing.
What is going to happen is the 15th annual version of grid picks,
this year jazzed up a little (but not much) with a new format and'
name, Gridde Pickings. "Ah yes," you're saying to yourself if you've
been through it before. "What the hell," you're saying to yourself
if you haven't.4
The thing about Gridde Pickings is that you get to enter this
here contest and try to win fame, fortune, and a Cottage Inn pizza
with anything you want on it. All you gotta do is pick the most win-
ners on the following group of exciting, top-notch, white-knuckled,
bare-chested football games that are going to be played this weekend.
If you get the most right of all the entries, you WIN and your
unfpgettable name will appear, yes appear, in the newspaper next
week. Plus you get the pizza.
So for heaven's sake enter, and enter quick. Your entry blank
must be here at The Daily, 420 Maynard, by Friday night at 8 p.m.
or you're disqualified.
We're working on bigger prizes.

It is generally. conceded that
Agase's performance at North-
western is not a reflection of his
ability, rather an indication of the
type of talent he's had to work N
with. Nevertheless, grumbling
alumni don't consider such fac-
tors, and they may call for Agase's
head as this year turns out to be
a disaster, as expected.
Jim Valek stepped into a tradi-
tion encouraging to him last year,
He became only the fourth Illinois
coach since 1913. Shown such pa-
tience, Valek should feel little
pressure as he tries to bring the
fighting Illini back to Big Ten
respectability.
With his initial year, usually a
season of adjustment, behind him,
Valek, a fierce, enthusiastic com-
petitor, hopes to improve on last
year's 4-6 mark.
ONE FOR WISCONSIN
Poor John Coatta. His f i r s t
season at the Wisconsin helm
wasn't exactly a heartwarming
experience. As p matter of fact he
failed to chalk up his first Big so
Ten win (the Badgers went 0-9-1).
This year should be much bet-
ter. He'll ?probably get that first
win. He can't count on much
more, though, and a two-year log
of 1-18-1 or so won't help him
towards Big Ten coaching immor-
tality.
1 It only figures that the offense
should be Coatta's encouragement
this year.' The 39-year-old coach
,was a star quarterback for Wis-
consin from 1949-1951. He claims
the conference record for seasonal
completion percentage (.642) and
the Badger record for completions
in a conference game (19).
Michigan's own Bump Elliot
has had an up and down career,
as indicated by his 43,40-2 record
in nine seasons..
His greatest achievements were
a conference title in 1964, follow-
ed by a thumping of Oregon State
in the Rose Bowl.
Elliot has turned in some credit-
able performances. However,
alumni are yearning for the Wol-
verines' return to perennial power,
a situation which hasn't existed
since 1940-1950. If Bump doesn't
at least break even this year, his
ten year career may come to an
abrupt halt.

MISTER R
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i'

..... .
... .

1. California at MICHIGAN
(pick score)
2. Northwestern at Miami, Fla.
(Fri. night)
3. Kansas at Illinois

-11

Downtown Honda
We Have Them All
Big and Small
State St.
SalesE Djvison S
SENKSs & Servie,. A. ervice s 9 tn"
* I

- I

10. Oklahoina at Notre Dame
11. Duke at South Carolina
12. Pittsburgh at UCLA
13. Oklahoma State at Arkansas
14. SMU at Auburn
15. TCU at Georgia Tech
16. Mississippi at Memphis St.
17. NC State at North Carolina
18. Navy at Penn State
19. Huston at Texas
20. Millsaps at Sewaneer

4.;
5.
7.
8.
9.

Baylor at Indiana 1
Syracuse at Michigan State
Southern Cal at Minnesota
Wisconsin at Arizona State
Virginia at Purdue

. .

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-- -s Oulv or V l ilb , IM
310 East 8
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95% OF THE READING POPULATION READS ONLY 250 TO
300 WORDS PER MINUTE OR LESS
FAST READING
IS NOT DIFFICULT TO LEARN
All those who completed courses held this past year at the Bell Tower Inn achieved speeds of
800 to 2000 w.p.m. with the same or increased comprehension they had at their slower read-
ing rates.

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Everything Goes-

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