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September 12, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ORCH ESTRA
Sponsored by
G&S,
MUSKET
Civic Theatre
"Gondoliers"
. Camelot
More!

Russians
continue
to depart
Czechs, Cernik.
sign' trade pact
PIAGUE (P)-More columns of
Soviet troops, tanks and artillery
withdrew from Prague yesterday,
apparently as a result of a visit to'
Moscow by Premier Oldrich Cer-
nik.
The only officially announced
result of Cernik's trip Tuesday was
an economic agreement. In-
formed sources said, however, that
Soviet leaders had shown them-
selves willing to withdraw the
bulk of their troops from Czecho-
slovak cities.
TANKS AND SOLDIERS
Tanks 'and, soldiers have been'
camped in parks and other public
sites since the occupation of,
Czechoslovakia by the armies of;
the Soviet Union, East Germany,
Hungary, Poland,. and Bulgaria on
Aug. 20-21.E
SOVIET EMBASSY
Troops still in the city appealed
to be pireparing to leave. The bulk
of the tanks guarding the Soviet
Embassy also left, but some could
still be seen inside the embassy
garden.
Among the sites freed during the
day were the editorial offices of
the weekly Reporter, put out by
the Czechoslovak Journalists' As-
sociation and a frequent target of"
the Moscow press. The magazine's
editors announced the next issue
will appear next week.
DUBCEK
Party chief Alexander Dubcek
met with Soviet Deputy Foreign
Minister Vasily Kutznetsov after a
briefing from Cernic, who talked
with Soviet party chief Leonid I.
Brezhnev, Premier Alexei N. Kosy-
gin and President Nikolai V. Pod-
gorny.

Judiciary

sets

Tuesday for vot

on Fortas nominatio

committee

-Associated Press'

South Vietnamese wait for supplies

mIusicl

"4 conttinuing'

experience for
nion-music majors"

VC penetrates
SAIGON AP) -About 2,000 U.S. B-52 bombers fle
South Vietnamese reinforcements ed strikes over the jung
maneuvered in a monsoon down- Tay Ninh City, droppi
pour last night for a bloody show- h t
down with Commiunist troops who than a illion poundst
penetrated Tay Ninh City, a pro- ives in an effort to he
vincial capital of 200,000 residents. troops converging on the

Tay

Ninh

4

ew repeat-
les around
ng more
of explos-
alt enemy
e city.

around the Cao Dai temple in the
city.
Other enemy units were report-
ted to be on Tay Ninh's south-
,eastern outskirts with the back-
up 'regiments moving in from the
Cambodian border 14 miles to the

!'

MASS MEETING
Michigan Union
Sept. 12, 7:30

Allied commanders say it may CAO DAI TEMPLE West.
'be the fiercest fight since the en- Vheeler said the three enemy North Vietnamese regulars are
emy's second-wave offensive last battalionsareholdingposibelieved to have seized the red and
May. gold temple of the Cao Dal, a pow-
the north estern and northeast- erful religious sect in Tay Ninh
7!500 MEN ' -- - - - - - - - - - -
A risoner taken in early fight- ern corners of Tay Ninh and Province.
ing around Tay Ninh, 45 miles - -
northwest of Saigon, said the en-TTs
emyy has comnmitted threer - t ru H l
ments with 7,500 men to try and U S .
take the city in three days.

'Spider' John Koerner

at

TOUSFi

SAP correspondent J o h n T.}
Wheeler reported that 1,500 enemy
soldiers, about t h r e e battalions,
are already inside or on the edges
of' Tay Ninh. According to t h e
prisoner, <a second enemy regiment
will move its three battalions into
the city today, and a third regi-
ment will deliver the final blow
tomorrow.
BJILITIAMEN
Government militamen fought
several stiff battles in and around
the city earlier Wednesday before
the 2,000 South Vietnamese para-,
troopers, marines and rangers
were rushed in by helicopters and'
road convoys.'Supporting elements
of the U.S. 25th Infantry Division
have moved around the southern
and western outskirts of Tay Ninh,
and other allied units are on 100
per cent alert to move in if nec-
essary.

PARIS () - The United States
told North Vietnam yesterday that
"further defeat, destruction and
death" faces the Communist com-
mand if it tries for total victory
in South. Vietnam.
At the end of a 21,-hour session,
the two sides at the Paris peace
talks appeared as far a'p a r t as
when they first sat down May 13.
It was their 21t meeting.
"In battle after battle, the Re-
public of Vietnam and its allies
have thrown back and inflicted
crushing defeats upon North Viet-
namese and Viet Cong troops,"
U.S. Ambassador W. Averell Har-
riman declared.
.. Replied North Vietnamese Am-
bassador Xuan Thuy: "As a re-

sult of the victories won by the}
people's liberation armed forces,
the U.S. aggressors are being driv-
en deeper into a passive defensive
position, and are finding them-
selves in an embarrassed 'situation
regarding both strategy and tac-
tics.,,
Spokesmen for both negotiatiors
said there had been no progress.
"Mr. Harriman once again play-
ed his old records," Nguyen Thanh."
Le, spokesman for the North Viet-
namese, told newsmen.
If the meeting was the shortest
on record, it was because "XUan
Thuy made his shortest speech to
date," U.S. spokesman William
Jorden' said.,

Opens way
to f1lor fgit
in Senate
WASHINGTON (I--The Sen-
ate Judiciary Committee agreed
yesteiday to reopen hearings \un-
der a limited time schedule on
President. Johnson's nomination
of Abe Fortas o be chief justice'
of the United States.
The committee, 'which has sat
on the nomination for more than
two months, agreed unanimopsly
to vote on it next Tuesday at 11
a.m.
The agreemnnt also sets a dead-
line of Sept. 20 for the filing ,of
majority and minority reports.
This opens thieway for the battle
over the confirmation to be car-
ried to the floor of the Senate in
the week beginning Sept. 23.
The compromise agreement rep-
resents matching concessions by
the opponents and supporters of
the Fortas nomination.
The committee's reopened hear-
ings, to be started as quickly as
possible,will deal with allegations
of Fortas' participation ini execu-
tive and legislative affairs since
he became an associate justice of
the Supreme Court in 1965.
If Fortas accepts an invittion
to return for further questioning,
he will be quizzed about Supreme
Court decisions in which he Joined
in overturning obscenity convic-
tions.'
Fortas was en rote back to
Washington from a Connecticut
vacation. He has not indicated
whether he will accept the com-
mittee's invitation.
Nominated rby Johnson on June
26 to succeed retiring Chief Justice
Earl Warren, Forta was question-
ed for four days in July. He de-,
clined to answer questions about
court rulings, on the ground this
would be a violation of the sepa-
ration-of-powers doctrine.
But whether or not Fortas
agrees to ; return, the committee
will take testimony from 'other
witnesses.
Chairman James 0. Eastland
(D-Miss) said Secretary of De-
fense Clark M. Clifford and Sen.
Gordon Allott (A-Colo) will be
invited to testify.
In addition, subpoenas are to
be issued for undersecretary of
the Treasury Joseph W. Barr;
former White House speechwriter
Richard Goodwin; DeVier W.
Pierson, a special assistant at the
White House, and Daniel Yergin,
author of an article in the July 22
issue of New York magazine.
The agreement setting a time,'
for a committee vote on Fortas',
nomination was a concesion by '
opponents. The reopening of thea
hearings was a concession by sup-
porters of his appointment.
Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-SC)
an opponent of confirmation who
had threatened a committee fili-
buster, said he and others had
succeeded in''having additional
witnesses called despite protests
from members who wanted to 'vote
without further 'hearings:
Sen. Sam J.Ervin Jr.(D-C),
another opponent, made the pro-
posal to vote next Tuesday. j
Senate Democratic Leader Mike
Mansfield of Montana said thatI
when the nomination is called up
in the Senate, he will not move
immediately to invoke the debate-.
limiting cloture rule.
He said the Senate should have
an opportunity to discuss the tes-
timony taken by the committee+
before any attempt is made to cut
off debate. .
Griffin and other opponents
have ,threatened a filibuster to
block confirmation. A two-thirds
majority is required to put the
cloture rule into effect.

HUI VERIT

FRI.
SAT.
SUN.

-Associated P
Senate Committee Chairman Eastland
FRIDAY DEADLINE:
Y teachersvote
to resume walkout

I

8:00

food and drink'
provided

$1.75 at the door ($1.25 after second set)

Tonight
The Oasuto Baroqge
Quintet

at

J I '\' y ;
'1
I f

DIAL 8-6416
STARTING TODAY

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M,

classical bodiddley music.
complete with human sacrifice- .
and THE EDSELARS-"oldies but goodies" with Bob
Franke, Jack Schuster,. Jack Quine, Pauline Norton,
Stimmy Wilcox; Boris Bresden and Harlan Himel-
instrumentation---everything from oboes to banjos.

NEW YORK (P)-- The A -
CIO United 1~ederation of Teachers
called yesterday for a resumption
of a two-day strike against New
York City public school system, a
walkout that had come to an end
earlier in the day.
The new strike deadline was
fixed for 9 'alm. tomorrow.
The union's executive board
hits new .vlow
WASHINGTON (P) -- The gov-
ernment reported yesterday the
unemployment rate in the nation
reached a 15-year low during Au-'
gust.
The number of jobless dropped
450,000 -- nearly twice the expect-
ed decline - to 2.8 million for
a national unemployment rate of
3.5 per cent of the civilian labor
force.
Down from 3.7 per cent in July,
unemployment 'was at the post-
Korean War low for the fourth
time this. year.
Payrool employment, excluding
farm workers and the self-em-
ployed, climbed 204,000 more than
ekpected to an August high of 68.6 E
million, said the Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
However, .much of the statisti-
cal improvement was due to large'
numbers of teen-agers quitting
jobs or giving up their unsuccess-
ful search for summer work in;
preparation for returning to
school.
the bureau said nearly 13 mil-
lion youths 16 to ,21 years old'
flooded the labor' market this
summer, 550,000 more than a year
ago. While summer employmentj
of youths rose 450,000 to 11.3
million, there were still 100,000
more unemployed than in 1967.
Withdrawal of many teen-agers
from the labor market reduced
their jobless rate from 13.6 to 12
per cent and their total from
900,000 to 822,000.

voted for renewal of the str
after Negro militants tried
bar teachers from returning
schools in the Ocean Hill-Brow
ville slum section of Brooklyn.
"The 'city should not allow
school system to be.run by a mo
Albert Shanker, the union jre
dent, declared.
The union had agreed to g
the Board of Education 48 ho
notice before any resumption
the strike.
Earlier, Shanker charged
local - Oc e a n Hill-Brownsv
school board violated an agr
ment urder which the strike
ended.
He I added: "Members oft
governing board physically blo
ed teachers from entering scho
and the chairman of the gove
ing board told) them not to go i
An agreement with the Bo
of Education had provided
biniding arbitration of disputes
Rhody McCoy, Negro adi
istrator of the Ocean Hill-Brow
ville experimentally deceritralI
school district, said of the thi
of a renewed strike: "What"Ab
the parents? What about
people in the community-w
about their feelings?"
The dismissal last spring of
white teachers in the Ocean H'
Brownsville led to the strike M
day of 55,000 UFT members.
delayed for two stays the opefi
of most of the city's 900 pu'
schools, in which 1.1 million pub
are 'enrolled.
The strike was settled Tpes
with agreement to reinstate
10, as well as some' 200 ot
Ocean Hill-Brownsville teac;
who walked out in sympathy I
May.
However, about X100 o the tea
ers encountered angry opposti
from parents in the Negro-Pue
Rican slum area. - McCoy I
newsmen: "What the conni
has evidenced is a compte
unequivocal position that t
don't want the teachers back.

'%

SIZZLER FROM FRANCE.
a milk-fed pup. 'Tlierse
M m i kdan d I s a b e l l e 'l b e t l i e m o s t
talkede-about moviearound."

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY-
PAMELA MILES'
-returning by overwhelming popular demand;
to sing contemporary and ORIGINAL folk music,
$ vplaying recorder and guitar.
$.0 cover includes free refreshments

,%I

-,WINS RADIO
f1'!1 '.r
f . \ .*Aa
- ~ 1 ~ t
Pr'uctiOU
,u A lmos

A SPORTIVE LOOK AT THE FERTILITY
RITES (AND, WRONGS) OF WESTERN SOCIETY.
20th Century-Fox presents
DEBORAH KERR DAVID- NIVEN.
NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES
rQ0 VIR LLIG
375 No.MAPLE RD.-7691300
NOW SHOWING
- MON.-FRI.
dthe 0090
SAT.-SUN
1:45-3:30
5:15-7:00
A KAHN-HARPER PRODUCTION - Color by De Luxe :0oo
THE DIRECTOR OF "ROSEMARY'S BABY"
BRINGS BACK TO THE SCREEN
FRIDAY, SEPT. 13th-1i1:00 P.M. ONLY
"A tour-de-force of sex and suspense!
e. -Life
tA Classic Chiller of the
Psycho School!"
-Time
Magazine
.J'J POLANSKIs

starring ESSY PERSSON ("I, A Woman") as Therese

PRIOR TO BROADWAY !

SEPTEMBER 17""9 [

M0LIERE'S
0**

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