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September 12, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 12, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, September 12, 1968

records
Paul McCartney 's co-optation of

r~ii

TWICE DAILY
at 1:30 and 7:30
Dial 665-6290

By RALPH J. GLEASON
Liberation News Service
The Beatles have finally dealt
directly with the American radi-
cals, politicos, and activists of
the student movement who have
been demanding that they say
something. .
The Beatles have said some-
thing and what they have said
is not going to be popular with
a great many. The more politi-
cal you are, the less you will
dig the Beatles' new song, "Re-
volution."
"You say you want a revolu-
tion," the Beatles begin in this
first release under their own
firm label, "Apple." Then they
sing, "Well, you know we all
want to change the world."
So far, so good. The second
line is without grounds for dis-
pute, too.
You tell me that's evolution,
well you know, we all want to
change the world..
Even the first refrain is with-
in the line of the current left-
political reasoning: "But when

you talk about destruction, don't
you know you can count me
out."
That last bit is where the
trouble begins. You can see the
activists dropping out wholesale.
How can you make omelettes
without breaking eggs?
Then the lads go on,
You say you've got a real so-
lution, well, you know we'd all
love to see the plan, indicating
that at least they'll listen. Then
they add something which
speaks directly to a lot of people
and their attempts to get the
Beatles to do something.
You can ask me for a contri-
bution, well, you know we are
doin' what we can.
And then they add a Joan
Baez capper,
But if you want money for
people with minds that hate, all
I can tell you is brother you
have to wait.
Even up to here, all the disc
does is nibble at the edge of
putting down politics. The final
verse really does it.
You say you'll change the
constitution, well, you know

we all want to change y
head
You tell me it's the instil
tion, well, you know, you b
ter feed your mind instead
But if you go carryin' p
tures of Chairman Mao, y
ain't gonna make it with ar
one anyhow .. .
So much for that. Thee
which the Beatles stick into
space between the verses ca
the distant refrain "Don't
know it's gonna be allllright
allllllright?" and in the clo
moments the word "allright
repeated eight times.
So the Beatles say put do
your flags and believe that
we need is love and say
word and you'll be free.
With the exception to the
ferences to Los Angeles smo
"Blue Jay Way" and per]
another which I can't thin
right this second, this son
the first one the Beatles s
to have directed toward Ar
icans, specifically student a
ists, Beatles fans all.
And the American acti
are going to have to deal
this if they insist on the
that the Beatles embody
youth movement and that
movement is by radical de
tions revolutionary.
They will also have to
with what Paul McCartney
a reporter from the New M
cal Express while discussing
ple's plans for financial hel
creative people as oppose(
giving the money to help,
cripples:
"Cripples are not necess
having a hard time of it,"
Cartney said. "And even if
are having a hard time of it
their hard time. It is, ma
doesn't matter what you
about helping cripples or I
. . . there's no way-to pour
lions of pounds into India
make India all right."
Then the NME reported a
McCartney if he hadn't
starving people and it d
worry him.
"No. Starvation inI
doesn't worry you," he told
reporter, "if you are ho
You just pose. You don't
know it exists. You've only
the Oxfam (a charity orgai
tion ads, You can't preten
me that an Oxf am ad
reach down into the depti

Seraphim tries ozart s quintets,

by R. A. PERRY
An excellent introduction to
the private pleasures of cham-
ber music can be found in the
six string quintets of Mozart.
Except for K. 174, the quintets
were written toward the end of
Mozart's life when the compos-
er's music revels in and reveals
a joyful seriousness nowhere else
found in music, except, per-
haps, in Bach. Pensive and mov-
ing andantes, ebullient rondos
of ingenious wit, graceful men-
uettos of intriguing instrumen-
tal counterpoint all seem to just
flow out, never to have been
toiled over in manufacture. It
is music purely from the mind,
never from the drawing poard.
Angel's new release of the
complete quintets on their bar-
gain Seraphim line poses a few
problems. Competition is keen
and offered primarily by the
Budapest Quartet with t h e
warm viola playing of Walter
Trampler; but this latter re-
lease comes on the higher priced
Columbia label. Although t h e
young Heutling Quartet w i t h
Heinz-Otto Graf filling the fifth
chair cannot equal the full mas-
tery or elicit the subtler insights
of the Budapest, they do a very
fine job Indeed.
In ensemble, the young Ger-
man musicians' possess almost
perfect Intonation a nd blend,
and their sylistic ideas have ob-
viously been, mulled over and
unified as well. Furthermore,
the lead violin of Werner Heut-
ling never loses its sweet pitch
or emotional poise. Stylistically,
they abide in t h a t European
eradiction of a warm, angst-free
approach to chamber music, as
opposed to the tenser, leaner

sound of such American groups
as -the Julliard or F i n e Arts
quartet. In other words, t h e
Heutling sound is very pleasant
to listen to.
Being a fairly new group,
however, they still seem quite
,conservative in the amount of
spontaneity t h etyallow them-
selves. They do not have full
confidence in theirsymbiosis to
play as freely as the Budapest
can; thus the finale of K. 593,
for instance, lacks the jocularity
it really should have. The Buda-
pest paint a larger and more
expressive canvas; the Heutling
are miniaturists - everything
in its place and beautiful to be-
hold, but basically less open and
expansive.
Still, how many groups can
be favorably compared to the
Budapest? The Seraphim set
represents an extraordinary val-
ue: the performance well above
average, the stereosound warm
and well-defined, liner notes
unusually full, and t h e price
wonderfully low. (SIC 6028)
Another set that can be reco-
mmended with certain qualifi-
cations is Alexis Weissenberg's
rendition of t h e "Complete
Works for Piano and Orchestra"
of Chopin on the Angel label.
(SC 3723.) No doubt aware of

other outstanding recorded per-
formances of the two Chopin
concerti, the producers at An-
gel felt that by including such
rarely heard pieces as the "Kra-
kowiak Rondo," "Andante spi-
anato," and "Fantasy on Polish
Aairs," they would induce the
buyer to invest in the three-
record set.
These shorter works do in-
deed abound in the grandilo-
quent Romantic flourish, a n d
Weissenberg plays them vigor-,
ously and effortlessly. They are
a welcome addition to the cata-
log and will spice up any collec-
tion.
The major attraction, Weiss-
enburg's renditions of the con-
certi, may not, however, con-
vince those who cherish their
Rubinstein, Lipatti, or Aaskena-
zy recordings. With an unfail-
ingly crisp and brilliant touch,
W e is s e n b e r g unquestionab-
ly misses some of the softer,
subtler poetry; yet in clearing
the air of that drawing room-
sachet feeling, he revitalizes
Chopin's music with a virile and
tense excitement that I found
quite beautiful. It is not a ques-
tion of technique, merely of how
you like your Romanticism serv-
ed up: flowers or steel.
Stanislaw Skrowaczewski leads

the Paris Conservatoire Orches-
tra in a sympatico role, but the
stereo sound spreads so that one
loses all sense of instrumental
definition. On the other hand,
the closely-milked piano has
been outstandingly reproduced.
Two short notices: The artistry
of the legendary horn player
Dennis Brain has been better
served than on Seraphim's new
release 60073. Featured is Mo-
zart's E flat quinete, a melodi-
ous and lively work that re-
quires more than a good horn
player - the horn is t h e r e
really only for added sonority.
Finally Leonid Kogan's per-
formance of the Tchaikovski
Violin Concerto possesses fan-
tastic brio and urgency. (S 600-
75). In contrast to t h e silky
sweet approach to t h i s well-
known concerto (Perlman's re-
cent RCA disc), Kogan digs into
the virtuoso guts of the work,
gives each double stop full
measure, and leaves no express-
ive moment unmentioned.

concernTHEDV NC osEVER!
our your soul and actually make GONE WITH THE171D
you feel for the people any
tu- more, for instance, than you feel
et- about getting a new car. If it Friday and Saturday $ 5O All Other , $ 00
comes to a toss-up, you'd get Eves. anddAll Day Performances
ic- a new car. And don't say you
wouldn t, because that's the
- scene, with you and most peo-
n- pie. The point is also, 'Do you
really feel for Vietnam?' and
echo the answers are the same. May- Wan 10 see the"Sandpipers
the be I'd rather listen to a rock
rries record than go there and enter-
you tain and maybe, underneath, They're coming with
... that's the truth in all of us. ITo
sing know one is morally better than
t" is the other, but I know I'd never The Bob Hope Show
get around to it. I'd be a hypo-
wn crite."
t all And there you have it. The
the answer to the questions raised SATUR DAYSEPTEMBER21
by ,the people who wanted the
re- Beatles to speak out against the 8:30 P.M.
g in war in Vietnam. To the people
haps who wanted the Beatles to en-
k of dorse this cause or endorse that University Events Building
g is cause and contribute to this
eem campaign or that campaign. Ticket prices: $4.00, $3.00
mer- Where does it leave every- Sign up for tickets in your housing unit
ctiv- thing? Well, I for one, welcome Block ticket orders due Se-t. 1 3th
what McCartney said as a
vists breath of fresh air. I think they or Mail orders 2503 S.A.B.
with are dealing with "what is" as or Single Sales begin Mon., Sept. 16th (lobby of S.A.B.)
idea Lenny Bruce did and not in
the "what should be." And the only Presented by Michigan Fraternities
t h e , way we are ever going to get and Sororities
fini- around to making what is into
what should be is by starting
deal with reality. For that I am
told grateful. Their attitude, as ex-
dusi- pressed by McCartney, is much
Ap- healthier than the patriotic
lp to crap ladled out by James Brown
d to and Martha Raye and Sammy CI
say, Davis and it faces right up to
the problem.
arily Money won't buy ma love. Nor THURSDAY and FRIDAY
Mc- will it buy salvation.
they
, it'sING
,n. It
say i
ndia -"
mil- 'AND
and -30x0 Washtenaw. Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
sked
seen CQUNTRY
lidn't I O D
Dir. Joseph Lomey, 1964
India
3the ddiLectedby
nest. Wrien*orhescrnnddirec.ed'by Private Hamp (Tom Courtney) volunteered for
even Richard Brooks active duty in the WW I British army because "the
seen ACorumbi PicturesRelease InPonovisio" wife and her mother dared me." After three years of
riza- service in Frnce, Hamp deserts. He is caught, court-
cd "IRRESISTIBLE!"-LIFE martialed, and condemned to death by officers intent
hs of on makingan example of him.
The defending officer in the court-martial, Cap-
t°°"'s""""tain Hargreaves (Dirk Bogarde) is at first antago-
nistic toward Hamp, but during the trial he realizes
that Hamp had reacted in a human way to an in-
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES human situation.
-__---___When the firing squad's volley fails to kill Hamp,
I wHargreaves, in the final bit of irony, is forced to
Lose Something? personally conclude the execution
Find it with a 7:00 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
Daily Classified 662-8871 75c AUDITORIUM

S7

4~

r

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THE MICHIGAN BANDS

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MISSED US??

"
II

Auditions for VAC Musket's
CAMEILOT
THURSDAY thru SATURDAY
SEPT. 12-14
BASEMENT OF UNION
All necessary information about
late sign-ups at Musket Office,
UAC wing-2nd floor of Union

Take Great Pride in Presenting
JOHNNY CARSON,
IN PERSON
with
Doc Severinson and Orchestra
Marilyn Maye
Bud and Cece Dance Team
in 2 Shows at 7:00 and 10:00 P.M.
on Saturday, October 5 at the
UNIVERSITY EVENTS BUILDING
S ALL SEATS RESERVED. Tickets priced as follows: Events Build
Floor: $5; Blue Section: $4; and Gold Section: $3. Mail orders may
sent to Johnny Carson Show, 1024 Administration Building, Ann Ar
48104. Accompany your order with a check made payable to
Michigan Bands. Orders will be filled beginning on September
General sales will begin on September 30.

ing
be
-bor
the
27.

The hanging was the best show in town.
But they made two mistakes.
They hungthe wrong man
and they didn't finish the job.

a guide to:
Apartments
Bars
Restaurants
with maps and
hints on, life
in Ann Arbor
$1.00

,S.

I

L

mod

L:

E

1I

At your
newsstand
NOW

NOTICE:
BECAUSE OF THE STAGGERING RESPONSE TO ZORBA LAST WEEK, THE Vth FORUM HAS MADE
SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS TO BRING HIM BACK AGAIN BEFORE HE RETIRES. YES, THE OLD
MAN IS BEING RETIRED-THE MOVIE IS BEING WITHDRAWN FROM CIRCULATION LATER
THIS MONTH-THIS MAY BE
YOUR LAST CHANCE TO SEE

A

ZORBA

THE

GREEK

ACADEMY
AWARDS

"'ZORBA THE GREEK
IS A DECIDED MUST-SEE!
Anthony Quinn's Zorba possesses all the energies
and urges of the great ones of history and myth."
-Bosley Crowther, New York Times

I

ANDRE MALRAUX
D/IS

ANTHONY QUINN
ALAN BATES
EFL r 1 Ar- AAC

"A grand uproarious Bacchanalian bash."
('Aw fhlA tho;"w- ho-Qt ,rti-r oftheat'~r!

I

I

Time Magazine

A tEONARD FREE MAN PRODUCTION cost'i g :: sodgeted Fm Matur ean
fl -- QTlIllW _ ft rn ii aU'--n

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