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September 11, 1968 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-11

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, September 1 1, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, September 11, 1968

p e.

STUDY SPRING VIOLENCE:
Brandeis center predicts.
racial trouble in schools'

Grad schools unsure about draft

(Continued from page one) draftables: women, veterans, and
1967. The law restricted deferable the physically disabled.
and "essential" occupations to Other schools also feared that
medicine, the ministry and those undergraduate education would
the National Security Council suffer from the loss of graduate
would designate as such. students who doubled as part-time

3

WASHINGTON (CPS)-On the
basis of information gathered
about riots and other disturbances
in America last spring, Brandeis
University's Lemberg Center for
the Study of Violence has predict-
ed that schools everywhere "will
become the sites of racial violence"
when they open this fall.
A large number of the racial
disturbances occurred in high
schools as well as colleges, ac-
cording to the study. By far the
largest number occurred during
the first week in April, in the days
following the assassination of Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. (The total
number of disorders in April ex-
ceeded that for all of 1967.)
Of the 91 school-involved dis-
orders in April, 38 were confined
to school buildings or campuses.
In those instances, physical vio-
lence was limited and injuries were
slight. A second group of 29 in-
cidents began in school buildings
and spread to other areas of the
community. This kind of disorder
was generally more serious, in-
volved more people (including
non-students), spread over a
wider area and caused more ar-
rests, inJuries-even deaths. t
The other 24 incidents were
limited to window-smashing and
fire-bombing, with schools only
one of a series of targets. This
group included students walkouts
from* both high schools and col-
leges.
The Lemberg Center's, data

(gathered for the most part from
newspaper accounts and in some
cases witnesses) indicates that Dr.
King's assassination heightened
existing tensions and grievances
of students, and was important in
precipitating disorders in April.
The number of school disorders
was already escalating sharply in
the early months of 1968, the re-
port says; that trend was only ac-
celerated by the assassination and
the feelings it caused in young
people. The capacity for violence
was present and important any-
way.
y The largest proportion of
"school disorders' were only in-
directly related to Dr. King's
death, the researchers say. More
directly related was student's re-,
action to "insensitivity on the
part oi school officials." Such in-
sensitivity was already resented
by students in many schools.
The proverbial "last straw" in
this case was some administrators'
reactions to the assassination: as,
for example when the principal of
Denver Annunciation1 High School
refused to lower the school's flag
in honor of Dr. King, and when
many schools would not *ancel
classes the day of his funeral.
On the basis of this year's and
earlier research, the Center de-
nied that violence in the schools'
was only a temporary reaction to
such violent and inflammatory
events as Dr. King's assassination.
"Unrest in the schools appears

to be a general and long-range
phenomenon, the sources of which
might be sought in any or all of
the following areas: the seacch,
for exictement and action by1
youth, specific grievances directed
at the quality of education and
school facilities, and rising anta-
gonism between white and black
students."
The magnitude of the April 1968
disorders t- which ranged from
silverware-dropping in a school
cafeteria to the destruction and
looting in Washington D.C. -
demonstrates the impossibility of
attributing such outbreaks to
simple causes, the Center staff,
concludes. The random nature of
forces that cause disturbances
make predicting and controlling
violence almost impossible.
The report urged officials of;
schools to study examples of the
peaceful stemming of violence and
solving of tense interracial situa-
tions. Only through the employ-
ment of such solutions, it said, not
through "last-resort repression
imposed by law-enforcement agen-
cies," can solutions to problems
be reached without violence.

An eight month wait on the teachers.
council's decision ended last The fears were translated into
February. "Essential" disciplines: numbers by Mrs. Betty Vetter,
none. executive director of the Scientific
Men in their first year or just Manpower Commission, a private
entering grad school were to lose organization of scientific societies.
their student deferments and be She predicted a draft, during
dumped into the 19-to-26-year- this academic year, of some 175,-
old draft pool, most of them as 000 grad students.
the oldest men in it. . , -

with her - expects the Pentagon
to end up drafting 120,000 more
men than it now plans.
HIGHER CALLS
Annual draft calls have, in fact.
averaged 100.000 higher than of-'
ficial forecasts for the past three
years, she points out.
The other, and probably crucial,
disagreement concerns the work-
ings of the draft system itself. l
Mrs. Vetter assumed the "oldest-
first" draft would, in fact, con-
sume all the older draft-eligibles
everywhere before dipping down
to those of tendered years.
That's simply not the way it
works, say Selective Servicez
spokesmen.
Each local board must, by law,
draft first the oldest men in its

boards with their aging students.
Draft boards, meeting monthly,
have hardly made a dent so far in
the big job of reviewing not only
student deferments, but also some
327,000 occupational deferments
for which official guidelines had
been removed by the same Na-
tional Security Council decision.
Almost all would-be grad stu-
dents should be able to enroll this
fall with little chance the draft
would reach them for at least the
next few months.
Hershey has indicated - al-
though there is no uniform policy
-that those who get draft no-
tices midway through a school
term may have their induction
postponed until the end of the
term.
The wave of graduate student
inductions, therefore, probably
won't begin to hit until February
or even later.

WANTED:
Imaginative people
to teach at
creative secular
Jewish Sunday School.
Call
Jewish Cultural School
663-7428 or
76' -8743

The law requires drafting the
oldest first from each local pool.
"The decision," said Logan Wil-:
son, president of the American
Council on Education, "m e a n s
that most college graduates in
1968 and students ending t h e i r
first year of graduate school in
1968 will be drafted in the near
future."r
Other educators warned of a 65'
per cent cut in the incoming grad-
uate class, with graduate schools
catering increasingly to "women,
older persons, those who have
physical disabilities and, ironi-
callyenough, foreign students."
Groesbeck indicated this ten-
dencY has shown up here also, al-
though not consistently. He s a i d
that each department is free to
set its own admission require-
ments, and some have begun shift-
ing their policies in favor of "non-

Pentagon estimates, even after F
adjustments from the fiscal to the,
academic year, indicated at most
around 68,000 grad student draf-
tees.

DISCREPANCY own little draft pool when it re-
Mrs. Vetter predicted the draft ceives a quota to fill.
of an additional 101,000 recent SIZE NOT AGE
graduates who were' not seeking But quotas are portioned out
higher degrees; the Pentagon's by national and state headquar-
adjusted numbers showed perhaps ters according to the size, not the
52,000. age pattern, of those local pools.
While Mrs. Vetter's figures add- And college graduates are not
ed up to a draft of 276,000 col- registered evenly among all draft
lege graduates, the Pentagon said boards; they tend to bunch up in
it planned to draft only 240,000 certain geographical areas, parti-
men altogether - about half of cularly the affluent suburbs.
them collegiates. Local boards with few or no
That discrepancy alone points graduates must still fill their own
to one of the main reasons w h y quotas, with younger men if, ne-
the estimates don't match: Mrs. cessary; and as they do, they take
Vetter - and here Hershey agrees some of the pressure off the other

4k

Mot
NwrAw
i

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. ... in architecture, engineering or science
I during summer vacation}

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-HAWTHORN CENTER
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your future?
then stop!

-Pt'.

MASS MEETING

Here's a once in a lifetime
opportunity for adventure and
challenge.
A civilican~ career with the
Army Recreation or Library
Program in Europe or the Far
East.

4

THURS., SEPT. 12 7:30

D P.M.

UGLI Multi-Purpose Room
International Assoc. for the Exchange of
Students for Technical Experience
SO YOU'VE ONLY GOT 50c
('til you hear from dad) ?
follow the student crowd
to the
AAUWvu 16th Annual, Used Book Sale
(records and magazines too)1
THURS. 9A.M. to 9 P.M.
FRIDAY 9 A.M. to 2 P.M.
STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING

COME TO,
ZIONITE

f you are single,
zen and have a
Recreation
Social Science
Arts and Crafts
Dramatics or
ibrary Science

a U.S citi-
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Salary: With Bachelor's degree-=$6786
Without Bachelor's degree-$5992

per year
per year

Call or Write:

Director of Nursing
Hawthorn Center
Northville Michigan
Telephone: Area Code 313-
Fl 9-300 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

1.

Impressions and
"Back from Isra

Discussion
Del

7'

WRITE FOR A BROCHURE

4

a

all

2. Israeli
3. Spicy

Folk Dances and

Songs

Israeli Food

SPECIAL SERVICES SECTION
IRCB
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20315

G RADUATE

ASSEMBLY

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 11

8:00 P.M.

at HILLEL, 1429 Hill St.

.Join

The Daily Staff

k

f
t.

FIRST MEETING

* -. -Y
~

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 11th

7:30

P.M.,

3rd floor Rackham

a1

-ALL GRAD STUDENTS WELCOME-
Students interested in working on Student-Administration, Student-Faculty, or Student-Faculty-
Admin. committees should make a s pecial effort to attend.

4

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'J Be at your relaxin' best,in
At-Home-Wear's cotton set with

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cozy zip-front jumper and knit
turtleneck. Sizes P-S-M-L.
A. Geometric print in black and

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15.00

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