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September 11, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, September 11, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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F y* III

McLain

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Indiana plans cinderella repeat

Angefr

ANAHEIM--Denny McLain both pitched and batted his
way to a 7-2 victory over California for his 29th win of the
season.
McLain at the plate drilled three hits and drove in two
runs while scattering nine hits from the mound and going
the route for the 26th time this season. He struck out 12
while narrowing the magic number for the Tigers to nine
games.
Detroit jumped in front, 1-0,,in the first inning on
a double by outfielder Jim Northrup and a single by Willie
Horton. They then added another run in the third, when
McLain tripled and came home on Dick McAuliffe's single,
stretching the score to 3-0.
The Tiger bats exploded with four runs in the fourth
inning to put the game out of reach running the score to 6-0,
with McLain's bases-loaded single driving in two of the runs.
Letting up slightly with a six run lead, McLain yielded
roundtrippers to Rick Reichart and Tom Satrino in the sixth
inning to lose his shut-out bid.
The Tigers added their final run in the top of the ninth

By JIM WILE
Big Ten champs, a trip to the
Rose Bowl, and the best record
in twenty-three years. Those were
the easy things. Easy because no-'
body in the world expected In-
diana to pull it off last year.
But that was last year, and the
real work is about to begin for
coach John Pont and his happy
Hoosiers. Pont says they're fat
SCOUTING
THE BIG TEN

MICHIGAN'S RON KUTSCHINSKI finished fourth in the prelimi-
nary Olympic 800-meter trials in South Lake Tahoe. The Wol-
verine runner (third from left) will compete in today's trials for
an Olympic berth. Jim Ryan, Kansas' star miler, placed third just
ahead of Kutchinski.

when Northrup doubled home
centerfielder Mickey Stanley.
McLain now seems assured of
becoming the first pitcher since
Dizzy Dean to win 30 games in a
season. By virtue of his 12 strike-
outs last night, he is also within
17 of Hal NewHauser's Tiger sea-
son strikeout record of 275.
McLain received a standing
ovation from the crowd of over
22,000 when he fanned Roger Re-
poz to end the game.
Meanwhile, Baltimore was rain-
ed out at Washington, putting
them 8/2 games back of league-
leading Detroit.

SPORTS STOPS:

and sassy, and the football world
is waiting to see if the men from
Indiana can repeat amiracle,
Speaking of miracles, there's the
Indiana backfield. Pont is blessed
with some solid All-American
prospects.mFor instance, there's
junior Harry Gonso, one of last
year's miracle men who is ready
to punt, pass, run, and get Cokes
if need be. Last year Gonso spark-
ed the Hoosier machine with
timely passing to his sticky fin-
gered flanker Jade Butcher. But-
cher was second in the nation last
{ daily
ors
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
ELLIOTT BERRY

i
'
z
F

JOHN ISENBARGER

KutsehTsk eyes Olympic bid
greats Taylor, Groza retire

play, adding an extra dimension
to the Indiana attack.
The power of fullback T e r r y
Cole will be missed this year but
coach Pont expects great things
from sophomore Hank Pogue.
Pogue, a good blocker runs the
100 in 9.9.
The Hoosiers will probably be
hurting in the defense department
this year. Pont lost three line-
backers, two tackles, and a good
pass defense. Indiana's defense
will probably not be one to instill
terror among the enemy. One
bright spot falls on the helmet of
senior linebacker Jim Sniadecki.
Last year he made 84 tackles
which Pont called "remarkable,
considering opponents consistent-
ly avoided his side of the field"..
Last year, aided by a tremend-
ous desire to ' win, the Hoosier
team never slowed. But they suf-
fered relatively few injuries, and
they might be less fortunate this
season. If a key man like Gonso
is hurt, the roof could cave in.
Gonso, a fairly small man, is fac-
ed with a missing middle line.
This alone should keep him run-
ning, and a moving target isrlike
a one-winged duck in October.
A favorable schedule will aid
the Hoosier charge. Conspicuous
in its absence from Indiana's
Western Conference line-up, is
Ohio State, a predicted Big Ten
contender and powerhouse.With:
its hardest games coming at the
end of the season (Minnesota and
Purdue), the Hoosiers may have
some trouble in keeping b o t h
spirit and body in peak perform-
ance.

HARRY GONSO

year in TD catches. He dropped
only three passes all last year.
Perhaps Indiana's foremost
weakness will be the middle of the
offensive line, due to the gradua-
tion of center Harold Mauro andI
guards Bob Russell and Gary Cas-
sells. This could cause the Hoos-
iers to run primarily to the out-
side. John Isenbarger, the Indiana
Davy Crocket, will cover most ofI
the frontier ground.
Pont feels Isenbarger is only
a half-year, away from being in
the class of a Keyes or a Simpson.
Last year he led the Hoosiers
in rushing with 579 yards and a
4.3 average. Isenbarger is a 1 s o
capable of throwing on the option'

Major League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

St. Louis
San Francisco
xCincinnati
Chicago
Atlanta
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
xHouston
Los Angeles
New York

W
90
79
73
76
74
70
68
68
66
65

L
57
67
69
71
72
74
76
79
80
82

Pct.+
.616
.538
.518
.510
.510
.486
.472
.451
.448
.442

GB
1012
142
15/
151
19
21
231/
241,E

x-Late game not included
YESTERDAY'S GAMES
Chicago 8, New York 1
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, ppd, rain
Houston 3, Cincinnati 2, 2nd game Inc
Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 0
San Francisco 4, Atlanta 2
Nw TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Chicago
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, night.
Los Angeles at St. Louis, night
San Francisco at Atlanta, night
Houston at iCncinnati, night
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
xDetroit 91 54 .628 -
Baltimore 83 62 .572 8
xBostofl 78 67, .538 13
Cleveland 77 71 .520 15
New York 75 70 .510 16
xOakland 74 72 .507 1712
Minnesota 69 77 .476 22/2
xCaifornia 63 83 .432 28%
Chicago 61 86 .421 31
Washington 57 87 .396 33x/
x-Late game not included
YESTERDAY'S GAMES
" Boston at Oakland (Inc)
Detroit at California (Inc)
Baltimore at Washington (ppd. rain)
Cleveland 6, Minnesota 2
New York 2, .5, Chicago 1, 0
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at Oakland, night
Detroit at California, night
Cleveland at Minnesota, night
Baltimore at Washington, night
Chicago at New York, night

By The Associated Press
Michigan senior Ron Kutschin-
ski qualified for today's final in
the 800 meters with a time of
1:48:4, good for fourth place in
his heat in yesterdays Olympic
trackhand field trials at South
Lake Tahoe, Calif.
Finishing first was freshman
Mark Winzenried of Wisconsin in
a time of 1:48:0. World mile rec-
ord holder, Jim Ryan, placed
third.
Al Oerter, three-time Olympic
discus champion, led discus quali-
fiers with a throw of 201 feet, 6
inches.
Oerter, who at 31 has hopes of
a record-setting fourth gold medal
at the Mexico City Olympics in
October, needed only one throw
to. best the 180-foot mark needed
to assure advancement into the=
final round yesterday when the
three top performers will be
chosen for the Olympic team.
Jay Silverstar, who holds the
pending world record of 218-4,
threw 200-7 on his first attempt
and also declined to take any
further throws.
Two athletes, Larry Kennedy
and Kurt Harper didn't reach 180
feet, but under U.S. Olympic Com-
mittee rules, only Harper - threw
171-4 was eliminated from the
finals.
Eight of the nine pole vaulters
at this high-altitude site.quali-
fied for the final today, seven of
them clearing 16-0.
Biloard
An important meeting for all
varsity and freshman wrestling
candidates will be held today
at the University Events build-
ing wrestling room at 4 p.m.
All interested men are invited
to attend,
* * *
The Women's Athletic Asso-
ciation is looking for a volun-
teer girls' judo instructor; a
black belt is not required. Any-
one interested should contact
W.A.A. president, Marty Dum-
ford 761-0175.

set Carrigan and Jon V a u g h n.
Andy Steben and Mike Flanagan
made 15-6, but Flanagan was re-
moved from the field for the
finals because of more misses.
x X
NEW ORLEANS, La.-The New
Orleans Saints announced the re-1
tirement yesterday of fullback
Jimmy Taylor, saying he "will
prbably go down in history as
Louisiana's g r e a t e s t football
player."
Taylor will continue his asso-
ciation with the Saints in a front
office capacity in the area of pub-,
lic relations.
''It is with deep regret and a
sense of great loss that Taylor's]
long playing career has come to
an end," said John W. Mecom Jr.,
owner of the club. "But it per-
haps is fitting that he played out
his career in his home state where'
he gave leadership and stability to
Louisiana's first professional foot-,
ball team."
Taylor will be 33 in 10 more
days and behind him are 10 years
of glory and records in the Na-
tional Football League.
CLEVELAND - Lou Grpza, thej
king of conventional kickers whose
talented toe made him the all-
time scoring leader in the Na-
tional Football League, was waived
yesterday by the Cleveland Browns
in what may signal his farewell
to professional football after a
21-year career.
In announcing their decision to
ask for waivers on Groza as NFL
teams cut down to the mandatory

In 1967, Gonza made good on all
43 of his conversion attempts and
11 of 23 field goals for 76 points.
DETROIT-The Detroit Lions
ot the National Football League
got down to their 40-player limit
yesterday by releasing four play-.
ers.

Former world record holders 1 40-player limit, the Browns said
Bob Seagren and John Pennel they planned to use the 44-year-
were among the qualifiers at old as a kicking coach. He could,
16-0 along with Jeff Chase, Les- however, be restored to the roster
ter Smith, Dick Railsback, Ca- at some future time.

-
95% OF THE READING POPULATION READS ONLY 250 TO
300 WORDS PER MINUTE OR LESS
FAST READING
IS NOT DIFFICULT TO LEARN
All those who completed courses held this past year at the Bell Tower Inn achieved speeds of
800 to 2000 w.p.m. with the some or increased comprehension they had at their slower read-
ing rates.

Released were running
Bobby Felts, pass receiver
Stokes, defensive end Lew
manu, and defensive back
Bass.

back
Sims
Ka-
Mike

ATLANTA-The Atlanta Fal-
cons claimed two former Minne-
sota Vikings yesterday and placed
four players on waivers, includ-
ing 11-year veteran Tommy Mc-
Donald.
Claimed from Minnesota were
Paul Flatley, 27, a 187-pound six
year veteran from Northwestern,
and Bob Berry, a 190-pound quar-
terback from Oregon who isin his
fourth year in the National Foot-
ball League.
The 34-year-old McDonald, a
175-pound flanker from Okla-
homa, rates as one of the top pass
receivers in the NFL. Prior to
joining the Falcons last year, he
played with the PhiladelphiaI
Eagles, Dallas Cowboys and the
Los Angeles Rams.
* * *
In other moves yesterday:
Baltimore - Cut defensive
tackle Andy Stynchula and de-
fensive back James Duncan.
Atlanta - Waived defensive
tackle Earl Rubke, flanker Ollie
Cordell and quarterback Ron Van-
derKelen.
--

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at a cost less than HALF that of other commercial
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Bring a book to a free, live demonstration of the
reading skills which will be taught in a GUAR-
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WD WILDS
311 S. State Street

Demonstrations WED. & THURS.
7:30 P.M., Sept. 11, 12
at the Bell Tower Inn, 300 So. Thayer St., across from Burton Tower

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