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September 11, 1968 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Bradley drives stampeding Longhorns

ROBIN BROWN
jazz and other-
music for moderns-
81t Midightl

By MARK HALPERT
The Football News picks them
Number 1 in the nation!
Sports Illustrated picked them'
third in the nation!
Touring Press picked them third
in their league!
University of Texas Coach Dar-
rell Royal was a little shocked by
the varying picks, but he did com-
ment that, "Sports Illustrated has
always been'kind to my Longhorns
ever since my good buddy has been
on the staff; the Football News
pick is flattering, but I am not in-
clined to agree with them; and
the Touring Press is a poll taken

NATIONAL
OUTLOOK
by men who actually visit t h e
campus, so I am sorry to say
their decision may be the most ac-
curate."
The sports fan can only be con-
fused at first, but further analysis
finds satisfactory information to
affirm, or deny all the picks.
Quarterbacking the Texas
Longhorns will be 'super', B1ill

turn ME on

II TUNE you. in

Laver takes pro tennis title
Ashe fails- in Open doubles

Bradley. If there is one question
mark on the team he is it.
Bradley was given a Texas style
buildup prior to the 1966 season.
After splitting the first two games
in his sophomore season he suf-
fered a knee injury from which
he has just recovered.
"Bill has just now' gotten over
that injury, and we now expect
him to play at full speed. In an
attempt to lessen the burden on
Bill we will run out of a straight
T-formation," c6mmented Royal
on his prize athlete.
In Chris Gilbert and Steve Wor-
ster, Texas will have one of the
finest halfback combos in the
' country. Gilbert is a bona fide
All-American having gained over
one thousand yards' in each of his
previous seasons.,
Worster was considered Texas'
hottest high school football player
in 1966, and Bradley's main dil-
emna may not be what play to
run, but which of his' talented
backs should run it. In addition
to being a fines runner Royal con-
siders Worster to be his best
blocking back, a fact which just
may enable Gilbert to have his
third one thousand yard season.
Ted Koy, a junior, will round
? out the backfield, and he must be
considered more than just as'-an
after thought. Ted is a quicker

Oklahoma will be out to revenge
last year's 9-7 loss to Texas when
the teams clash on October 12, but
as far as league standings are
concerned the Thanksgiving day
clash with Texas A. & M. 'looks
like the feast or famine affair.
Quarterback Ed Hargett has to
be the big name for Texas A.&M.
After four losses in the '67 sea-
son Hargett rallied the Aggies to
a victory in the next seven en-
counters including a 20-16 upset
of Alabama in the Cotton Bowl. A
victory which was well earned by
Chach Gene Stallings, a nassist-
ant under Bear Bryant In prev-
ious years.
This years squad is centered
around .quarterback Hargett,I
flanker Bob Long, and halfback
Larry Stegent.,
If the Longhorns and the Aggies
fail, 'watch out for the Horned
Frogs from TCU. Last year TCU
managed to put together five wins,
inl their last six games, but what
they seem to lack is a passing
game. Linzy Cole is a speedy addi-
tion at end, but there appears to
be none capable of throwing his
way.
Arkansas will rest its hopes on

1p2.9

plays like a hungry mountain lion,
despite his millions in the bank,
will anchor the defense which as
always will be a stingy one.

:' :
}.

ORTHAND I N
ACHINES) ukr 1I20 wpin
MBOLS & ulgtrnopa 6
kBC'S i if ui tE. WEEKS

By The Associated Press
BROOKLINE, .Mass. ()-Rod
Laver rtde his twisting service
and slashing variety of placement
shots to a 6-4, 6-4, 9-7 rout of
fellow Australian John Newcombe
yesterday to win his third straight
U.S. Pro Tennis Championship
and fouith in five year.
The left-handed perennial -king
of the pros took command early
and then fought back brilliantly
every time he faced danger in the
long-delayed finals of the rain-
plagued $32,000 tournament at
Longwood which started back in
June.
The victory was worth $8,000 to
Laver, who previously won the
tournament in 1964,, 1966 and
1967. Newcombe earned $4,750.
Newcombe gave Laver his first
chance in the fifth game of the
opening set 'when he missed ap,
easy shot at the net and then
double faulted to make the score
3,0-all. The defending champion
seized the opportunity, winning

the next two points and the game
on a pair of sharply placed re-
turn-
Meanwhile at Forest Hills they'
finally got a weary and bedrag-
gled Arthur Ashe, Jr., off the cen-
ter court.'
In the last 24 hours-just 27
minutes under-the skinny Negro
sar had played a total of 162
games, winning the U.S. Open
singles championship, fighting his
way into the doubles final in a
three-day match and then, hi
pipe-stem legs like rubber, losing
in the last round of the men's
doubles.,
The men's doubles crown wen1
to America's two young Davis Cup
specialists, Stan Smith and Bobby
Lutz of Pasadena, cllf., whc
whipped Ashe and his partner, pro
Andres Gimeno of Spain, 11-9, 6-1,
'7-5.

ED HARGETT -
and more compact version than
his brother Ernie, now starring
for the New York football Giants.
"Deryl Comer isan outstanding
tight end, but I believe we will
utilize his blocking talents a great
deal more than previously, since
we will revert to the pass only
when necessary," commented
Royal.
Linebacker Corby Robertson

BILL BRADLEY
sophomore quarterback Bill Mont-
gomery, but the squad in general
does not appear deep enough to
be a top contender.
The rest of the conference;
Rice, Texas Tech, SMU and Bay-
lor all have squads capable of
pulling an upset, but again not
much more. The player to watch
in this crowd is flanker Jerry
Levias of SMU.
All in all Texas A&M looks like
a good bet to place, but if yqu are
going to pick a winner a gentle-
men's bet looks like the soundest
investment.

5.
S
7T
v
D

Canham sparks innovahion, at, OldYost'

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Smith and Lutz thus added 'the
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conquest at Brookline, Mass., two
weeks before.

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By CLARK STEVENS
Michigan athletic director Don
Canham is planning to purchase
a 40 yard by 40 yard piece of
Astro-turf to be used in Yost
Fieldhouse . . . that's right, Yost
Fieldhouse.
And unbelievable as it sounds
Canham said the Astro-turf would
give the baseball team a chance to
take some infield practice luring
the winter and give the football
team nearly half a football field
to use in bad weather in the
spring.
At other times the .fieldhouse
may be turned over to intra-mural

sports such as volleyball, track,
and basketball.
The Astro-turf can be rolled,,out
and zipped together quickly when
needed. When not needed it can
be rolled up and stored very
easily.
A lot of things won't seem the
same to the people who will be
visiting Yost this year, besides the
new Astro-turf. Canhani. has had
a lot of work done this year
around the fieldhouse.
The most noticeable will)e seen
at indoor track meets. The old dirt
track the boys had to use, is a
toiing of the past. The former
track coach has had the field-

,Forming
ALL-CAMPUS
for Wednesday Nights
Sign up at Michigan Union Bowling Lanes desk
A.B.C. Sanctioned-
-SEE GEORGE -

house floor blacktopped and is
now in the final processes of put-
ting down another coat of springy
material that looks and feels like
blacktop over the floor. The new
track will be marked off on this
surface which also provides the
soft springy base needed for the
Astro-turf.
The layout of the track will also
be much improved p~his year. The
dash men will no Tnger have a
wall 'staring them in the face fiat
the finish line.;The dash track will
run 60 yards diagonally across the
infield of the track with plenty,
of room to. spare at the finish.
Then there are many improve-
ments that the fans won't sce.
The upstairs locker rooms at Yost
used by the footballers during,
practice have been repainted"
maize and blue; a blue carpet has
been put down; and the eouip-
ment room and the coaches lock-
er room have been moved down-
stairs giving the players more
room to dress.
Public relations director Will
Perry says that there is a plan to
put pictures of all Michigan All-
Americans. over the lockes as
well.
The locker room under the foot-
ball stadium which is the one used

fo'r football games has received
the same treatm nt. It ' too has
been enlarged, repainted, carpet-
ed, and new lockers have been
put in giving 'the players more
room and a more comfortable at-
mosphere.
When asked about the possi-
bilities of Astro-turf in the foot-
ball stadium Canham brought up
the fact that the 40 yard square
piece would cost about $20,000.
With the three new scoreboards
running in the neighborhood of
$75,000 Astro-turf may not be in
the very near future for the foot-
ball stadium.
Canhan admitted though that
Astro-turf has been very success-
ful in other open-air stadiums
and was desirable because it could
be zipped up and stored when not
in use allowing many more events
to take place in these stadiums.
He also said that rain would
drain off the Astro-turf just as
well as it would .drain off the nor-
mal grass and dirt field, although
it might tend to become rather
slick in wet weather.
Canham has indeed gone to
great length to make a pleasant
atmosphere for his athletes. Now
if the teams can only catch up
with their surroundings .

14

;>

Evening Classes}
Begin Oct. 7th
ENROLL NOW

{silk to: -4
(Coach, Wolverines Football Team)
on SPORTS HOTLINE
7:30 Wednesday night
r ~Call in: 761-3500,
Listen on:
S76-350
WN,650 7130

i4

AMILTON BUSiNESS COLLEGE,
$ATE & WILLIAM 4 ANN ARBOR'

f

lit

,

p

IFC QUADRANGLE

V'

INFORMATION PROGRAM

r

i

lM S OA

f,

_r

I

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 11th

4

DOUGLAS HOUSE-BURSLEY 5TH FLOOR LOUNGE

6:30

FROST HOUSE-MARKLEY 6:30

q S t

HAYDEN HOUSE-S. QUAD

6:30

BEGINS SEPTEMBER 7

GOMBERG-KELSEY-S. QUAD 6:30
ALLEN-RUMSEY HOUSE-W. QUAD

i

6:30

Registration Sept. 9 thru Sept. 13

THURSDAY, SEPT. 12th

ENGINE ARCH

BART LET T HOUSE-BURSLE Y 4TH FLOORLOUNGE 6:30

REEVES HOUSE-MARKLEY 6:30
STRAUSS HOUSE-E. QUAD 6:30

DIAG

MOSH ER LOUNGE-6:30

s k uU 01 " NoMA

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