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September 10, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-10

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Tuesday, September l Q, 196$

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Poem"Nina

Tuesday, September 10, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

F U JZ 1 -4 1 f M

s

. Amateur Ashe downs Okker to grab Open;
stretches tennis singles win streak to 26

SPORT STOPS:
Gold Cup crash proves fatal

FOREST HILLS, N.Y. (P-Arthur Ashe, Jr., a scrawny
Negro amateur once barred from playing on the courts of
his native Richmond, Va., reached the pinnacle of tennis yes-
terday when he won a slamming, scoot and scramble dual
from young Tom Okker of The Netherlands for the U.S. Open
Championship.
The score of the near three-hour marathon was 14-12,
# 5-7, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3.
It was the 26th straight singles victory dating back to
July for the 25-year-old Army lieutenant and it strengthened
his bid for No. 1 world ranking among boh amateurs and pros.
The triumph, before an ecstatic crowd of 7,100 at the
West Side Tennis Club, also injected new life into the Ameri-
--- can game, which has been in

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
ANDY BARBAS
Committee pi
of IM recreal

By The Associated Press physical concussion of the head.
DETROIT - Warner Gardner, chest and abdomen, as well asj
injured when his 130-mile an hour severe shock.'
powerboat disintegrated when it Gardner, who made his home in
smashed into the Detroit River in Bay City, was a World-War II
Sunday's Gold Cup race, died yes- fighter pilot and took up speed-
terday. boat racing while stationed at

.

II

,

Detroit General Hospital
death came 24 hours after

said Selfridge Air Force Base before
the his retirement.
* * *

crash.

The 52-year-old retired Air CHICAGO - The U.S. Olympic
Force lieutenant colonel had un- Committee *met Sunday and se-
dergone surgery for removal of a lected Los Angeles over San Fran-
brain blood clot and suffered Cisco at the U.S. city to officially
what was described as general bid for the 1976 Games before the
International Olympic Committee
when it meets in Amsterdam in;
an e0asinMay.
a S eXpansion Los Angeles, site of the 1932
Olympics, and San FranciscQ were!
tion f ilities the only cities bidding to rep-
resent the United States fora

Seven years ago, Gordon was
fired by owner Charles O. Finley
as manager of the Athletics.
* * *
MONZA, Italy - Denis Hulme,
the 32-year-old racer without a
single victory in Grand Prix this
season, valuted to fourth place in
the world Formula One auto driv-
Hooray !
ANAHEIM (A') - Mickey Lo-
lich fired a two-hitter and Wil-
lie Horton, Mickey Stanley and
Al Kaline slammed home r u n s,
leading the Detroit Tigers to a
6-0 victory over California last
night that boosted their Ameri-
can League lead to eight games,
and cut their magic number to
10.
ing standings, after a victory Sun-
day in the Grand Prix of Italy.
Only six of the 20 drivers fin-
isher the race. Hulme increased
his points for the world champ-
ionstip from 15 to 24, only six
behind Hill. Ickx moved into first
place with 27 points.

Rugby football
faces critical
field shorta e
By DAVE CAMPBELL
Daily Guest writer
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Dave Campbell
is a member of the Michigan Rugby
Football Club and summarizes below
the basic complaint of the club in
regard to field space.)
Last Saturday, September 7, the
' Michigan Rugby Football C I u b
played its first home game. It
was a trial game, designed to give
newcomers to the club an idea
of playing under match condi-
tions.
But, although' the game was or-
ganized and executed efficiently,
this objective was impossible to
accomplish due to the inadequate
playing field.
The game was played on Ferry
Field, which is not even wide
enough for regulation touch-foot-
ball! Rugby, with its lateral pass-
ing movements, requires a much
wider field to have a representa-
tive game. Even though a request
for a full, size field had been made
to the Athletic Department a
month ago, it was only last Thurs-
day that the request was finally
rejected.
Ferry Field is - not only too
small, the asphalt patches along
the sidelines and behind the goal
posts also make tackling danger-
ous. Unlike American football, the
end zone is part of the playing
area. In fact, it is necessary to fall
on the ball in the end zone to
score a try (three points). ,
Meanwhile the "A" team w a s
playing away in Windsor. Before
thel Wines Field crisis blew up, the
rugby club had planned to enter-
tain a club in Ann Arbor on Sep-
tember 7 so that the new members
could see a game first hand. When
it was realized that there would
be a great shortage of fields, this
Idea had to be dropped.
Now, after its first game, the
rugby club finds itself in exactly
the situation they predicted ear-
lier in the summer. With home
games on the next two weekends
-- a trial game September 15,
0 and the first home league match
September 21 - the club does
not have an adequate field to
play them on.
Wines Field is scheduled to be
opened within a week, but the
club feels that the grass will be
ruined almost immediately if it is
used so soon. The only place left
to play these homes games is
the football practice fields.

the doldrums for close to 15
years.
The last American man to win a
title on the center court here was
Tony Trabert in 1955.
FIRST NEGRO
Ashe became the first U.S. win-
ner of the National Amateur title
in 13 years by winning at Brook-
line, Mass., two weeks ago and the
first Negro ever to take that
crown.
The Open now. gives him the
"big double"-both the U.S. Ama-
teur and Open crowns-and, as
semifinalist in the inaugural
Wimbledon open earlier this year,
projects him alongside the game's
giants, including Rod Laver, Tony
Roche and Pancho Gonzales.
These ranking pros and 10
others were among the stars of the
professional game to fall before
amateur rackets in this inaugural
U.S. Open.
Okker himself is technically an

-Associated Press
ARTHUR ASHE RETURNS the ball to Tom Okker during the
finals of the men's singles in the U.S. Open Tennis Champion-
ship. Ashe emerged as champion in a three hour marathon.

amateur, a so-called registered A
player, but he was permitted to i
collect the $14,000 first prize un-
der relaxed international rules.
Ashe; a pure amateur, played
for $15 a day-the Davis Cup al-
lowance-and a place to stay. The
United States doesn't permit its XD
amateurs to accept prize money, xB
as other countries do.rc
Ashe and Clark Graebner, his N'
Davis Cup teammate whom he de- X0
feated in the semifinals, become xc
strong favorites to recapture the ci
Davis Cup from Australia in De- W.
cember. X-

!she's devastating serve and uncanny lobs proved the difference
n the match.

The Advisory committee on Re-
creation, Intramurals, and club
sports set up a list of three prior-
ities at the first meeting Friday
night.
Additional space for outdoor
fields, and repairing varsity and
basketball courts and football
fields, and repairing varsity and
women's tennis courts rated as
the items which needed immediate
attention.
Plans to repair the courts are
already in progress. Temporary
football fields to accommodate
the fall Intramural schedule are
being arranged through the use
of city parks.
Wines Field, which was re-
vamped this summer to give more
space for Intramural and club
sport use, will not be available for
extensive use this fall due to the
problem of maintaining the new
grass.
Another area of concern involv-
ed insurance for club sports,
which have recently set-up a trav-
eling schedule. Club sports are
not covered under University pol-
icy, although they do use uni-
versity grounds.
The committee was set, during
the summer by President Flem-
IBillboard
An important meeting for all(
varsity and freshman wrestling
candidates will be held tomor-
row at the University Events
Building wrestling room at 4
p.m. All interested men are in-
vited to attend.

ing to "function as advisory to
the Director concerning the needs
of the University with respect to
the development and mainten-
ance of facilities for and programs
in recreation, club sports, and in-
tramural competition, and policies
applicable to such facilities and
programs."

chance at the 1976 Olympic
Games.
* * * '
KANSAS CITY - Joe Gordon
returned to Kansas City yesterday,
this time as manager of the Roy-
als 1969 expansion club. He was
given a one-year contract at his
own insistence, "to prove what I
can do."

ATTENTION
SEIR

Major League Standings

)etroit
aaltimore
oston
leveland
Tew York
akiand
innesota
ialifornia
!hicago
'ashington
Late game

W L Pct.
90 54 .625
83 62 .572
77 67 .535
77 71 .520
73 70 .510
74 71 .510
69 76 .475
63 82 .434
61 84 .421
57 87 .396
not included.

GB
73 '
13
15
'161:
16.
211
271;
291
33

DRAMATIC FINISH
After the two young athletes--
Okker at 24 a year younger than
Ashe-had battled through more
than two hours, the match reach-
ed a dramatic climax in the fifth
set.
Ashe, after playing loosely in
the fourth, came out like a jungle
cat and broke Okker in the second
game, taking a quick 2-0 lead.
With the score 30-30, Ashe scored
a perfect lob for 30-40 and then
clinched the break by forcing the
Dutchman to - miss a backhand
volley.
Then the two slugged it out on
service, with no quarter gives by
either, and Ashe clinched the
match by serving a love geme-
one of many for him-in the
clincher.
Ashe slammed across a total of
28 aces during the long match-
smoking thunderbolts that reach-
ed 115 miles per hour-and Okker
had 11. The Dutch youth had
eight double-faults to five for
Ashe.
In postmatch ceremonies, Ashe
called it his greatest victory and
greatest moment.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 2, at Washington 6
Cleveland 6,aMinnesota 1
Boston at Oakland, inc.
Detroit at California, inc.
Only games scheduled.
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at Oakland, night
Detroit at California, night
Cleveland at Minnesota, night
Baltimore at Washington, night
Chicago at New York, 2, twi-night

NATIONAL LEAGUE
WV L Pct. GB
St. Louis 90 56 .621 G
San Francisco 78 67 .538 111/
Cincinnati 3 68 .518 14%
Chicago 75 71 .514 15
Atlanta 74 71 .510 15f
xPittsburgh 70 73 .490 18'
xPhiladelphia 67 76 .469 211
Houston 65 79 .451 24
Los Angeles 65 80 .444 2412
New York 65 81 .445 25
x-Late game not included
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Houston at Cincinnati (2), rain
Atlanta 2, San Francisco 1
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, inc.
Los Angeles 10, St. Louis 1
Only games scheduled.
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at Atlanta, night
Los Angeles at St. Louis, night
Houston at Cincinnati, niight
New York at Chicago
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, night

- -- - -

r

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