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September 10, 1968 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-10

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 10, 1968

PaeEih HEMCIGND~L uedy Speme 0,16

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By JOE MARKER
Miinnesota's Golden Gophers
have reason to take an optimistic
outlook toward the upcoming
1968 football season. Coach Mur-
ray Warmath has 26 lettermen re-
turning from last year's s qu a d
which tied Purdue and Indiana
for the Big Ten crown. In addi-
tion, an uiiusually talented group
of sophomores should provide an
excellent supporting cast,
A murderou's schedule, however,
will make an improvement on
1967's eight and two record very
difficult. Defending national
champion Southern California in-
vades Minneapolis for the opener
September 21, followed by highly
regarded Nebraska. For this rea-
son, the Gophers can ill afford
their customary slow start. Pur-
due, generally considered the fav-
orite for the Big Ten title, closes
out the home schedule on Novem-
ber 9.
Minnesota's offensive unit re-
turns nearly intact and features a
devastating line. The left end slot

is capably manned by Chip Litten,
a sticky fingered receiver with ex-
ceptional running ability who led
the Minnesota receivers last year
with nearly 300 yards on passes
caught. Leon Trawick has been
switched from defensive end to
fill the gap at right end left by
the graduation of Charley Sand-
ers.
Ezell "Easy" Jones spearheads
an interior line which should wear
down all but the most determined
opposition. An exceptional block-
er, the 6'4", 245 pound tackle is
one of Minnesota's two strong
All-Americanncandidates. Dick
Enderle and Tom Fink are cer-
tainly better-than-average guards.
The graduation of John Williams
leaves a hole at left tackle, with
junior Jim rrobel battling Al-
vin Hawes and three other out-
standing sophomores for the job.
At center, Seve Lundeen h a s
been a tower of strength, but the
question arises whether he can
overcome a variety of ailments
and injuries including a bout with

mononucleosis during the spring,
drills and chronic back trouble.
If he should falter, Ted Burke, a.
6'6" junior, would provide a bet-
ter-than-adequate replacement.
SOLID RUNNERS
The Gophers have all the in-
gredients of a fine running game.
All three halfbacks, G e o r g e
Kemp, Maurice Forte, and Rags
SCOUTING
THE BIG TEN
Cooper, are returning. Although
none rushed for a high average
last year, they were effective at
gaining the short yardage. There
are no worries at fullback where
Jim Carter, 1967's leading
ground gainer with 519 yards,
should improve on his perform-
ance by running behind an im-
proved forward wall. He seems to
stand out in the important games,
last year .starring in his team's
21-0 and 33-7 routs of Michigan
State and Indiana. Not only a
running threat, Jim snagged nine
passes last year.
Mike Curtis, who alternated
with the departed Hubie Bryant
last year, is the favorite for the
flankerback position. However,
he is being ,hard-pressed by soph-
omore speedster Terry Addison,
who may yet claim the first spot.
The one glaring question mark
in the offensive alignment is the
quarterback position. Curt Wilson,
turned in an outstanding job in
1967 but has' graduated, leaving
no experienced successor. Veter-
ans Phil Hagen and Ray Stepens,
along with sophomores Walt Bow-
ser and Greg Mitchell, are wag-
ing a spirited battle for the post.
A typically solid Minnesota de-
fense will face the opposing of-
fenses this year. The mainstay of
most great Gopher teams has been

the defensive line, and 19681
should be no exception. Opposi-
tion runners will have plenty of
trouble turning the corner, with
All-American candidate B o b
Stein and Del Jessen manning the
end positions. Both are especially
effective at throwing opposing
runners for losses, Jessen turning
the trick six times last season
and Stein eight times the year be-
fore in only two games.
Ron Kamzelski, a 240 pounder
who loves contact, is outstanding
at defensive left tackle. However,
the graduation of standout Mc-
Kinley Boston has weakened the
right tackle slot, with sophomore:
Mike Goldberg favored for the
job.
The uncertainty which charac-
terized the Minnesota linebacking
situation last year is absent, with
veterans Dave Nixon, John Dark-
enwald, Wayne King, and Noel
Jenke returning. King and Nixon
ranked among the Big Ten lead-
ers in tackles last year, with 78
and 64 respectively. Dennis Corn-
ell, a fullback in 1966 who missed
all last season and spring prac-
tice due to a knee injury, may
provide needed bench strength.
SECONDARY TOUGH
Opposing quarterbacks will find
it very difficult to penetrate the
Gopher secondary. Jeff Nygren,
Dennis Hale, and Doug Roalstad,
bolstered by promising sopho-
mores, should more than hold
their own against any attack. In
addition to his backfield duties,
the versatile Nygren kicked the
winning field goal last season in
the Illinois game.
Minnesota's first team should be
one of the top three or four in
the conference, but a valuable
plus factor is the extensive depth
at almost every position. Both the
offensive and defensive ,lines are
large and powerful, although not
blessed with excessive speed. The
halfbacks and fullback Jim Car-
ter, likewise powerful but not
fast, should run effectively behind
this strong forward wall. The
defensive backfield, where one
mistake: is often punished by a
touchdown, is manned by depend-
able veterans.

rinnesota
The important task of opening
up the offensive attack rests with
the quarterback. The Gopher:s
have the receivers necessary for
an effective passing attack, but it
is not at all certain that they have
a quarterback capable of throwing
the ball on target. If Minnesota
can develop a decent passing at-
tack, the devastating rushing at-
tack can wear down the opposition
by sheer force. If, however,' the
passing game fails, the opponents
will stack their defenses against
the running game. In this event,
it is highly unlikely that a team
of even Minnesota's strength can
run over powerhouses like South-
ern Cal. Nebraska. Purdue, and
Indiana.
The Gophers' schedule is very
favorable for a high conference
finish. The two tough non-con-
ference games with Southern Cal
and Nebraska, although they may
hurt any chances for a high na-
tional ranking, should prepare the
team well for the Big Ten grind.

optimism

4

EZELL JONES

CHARLES (CHIP) LITTEN

I*

CHARGE IT!
*,PRESCRIPTIONS
f COSMETICS
0 MEN'S
TOILETRIES
1112 South University .,,Phone 663-5533

(Western Indpenden grders
not exactly a national power

I

By ROSS PASCAL
When the major wire services
release their final "Top Ten" this
year, it's probable that not a
single Western Independent team
will be on it.
Teams from this area rarely
get recognition, and thisyear at,
least, it's questionable if any of
them deserve it.{
,Last year, Utah State coach
Chuck Mills brought the Aggies
from a dismal 2-7 season to with-
in seven points of an undefeated
campaign. This season he'll have
a tough time duplicating that re-
cord.
The Aggie offense led by quar-
back Altie Taylor, and flanker,
terback John Pappas, running
back Altie Taylor, and flanker

Mike O'Shea, could be potent. Phil
Olson. brother of the Rams' Mer-
lin and Chuck Detwiler (no rela-
tion to former Wolverine Jim) are
defensive standouts with All-
American possibilities. Though
NATIONAL
OUTLOOK
having lost the better part of
their offensive and defensive
lines, the Aggies don't appear
headed for a repeat of last sea-
son's miracle.
Ed Epping could be the best
lineman in Air Force's history.
Epping, along with Barry Cline
should help plug up the Falcon's

Jim Wood inherits only twelve let-
termen from last season's success-
ful (7-2-1) grid team. S o m e
junior college transfers should
help out the Aggie offensive line,
which doesn't have a single letter-
man on it. The only experienced
member of the defensive line is

Highest Quality Always

huge Roby Jackson (296), an out-
side guard.
One' bright spot for the Aggies
lies in the backfield. Quarterback
Chuck Bertolina and halfbacks
Jim Terrell and Don Jones are all
proven ball handlers. All 'in all, it
looks like a long season for New
Mexico State.

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A~l

-------- --rather holey defense. Coach e
Martin's defensive line better be
solid, because his offense looks
Talkto :no better than a year ago, when
TT the Falcons averaged a little over
BUMP ELLOseven points a game.
( U W e Footbal Team) Two experienced quarterbacks,
Coach, W verines Steve Truner and Gary Baxterr,
on SPORTS HOTLINE may bolster the attack, while 9.6
speedster Curtin Martin is- an ex-
7:30 Wednesday night tremely capable halfback. Unfor-
tunately, the outstanding perfor-
Call in: 761-3500 mances of a few Falcons will be
Listen on;761-350 overshadowed by the squad's lack
6761-3502of depth.
In his first year as head coach,

t
.
t
i
S
I

Even with Colorado State de-
feating Emporia State last year
77-0,. the Rams finished with a
mediocre 4-5-1 record. Though
Emporia State is not on their
schedule again this year, Mike16
Lude's team should be improved.
The Ramn defense is tough,. espec-
ially in the secondary where Bill
Kishman roams, Top backs are
Larry Jackson and Jerry Montiel.
The Hawaii Rainbows didn't get
a chance to play Emporia;State
last year, but they still finished 4
the season with a respectable 6-4
slate. There's'no reason to suspect
that they'll do any worse this
year. They have a large number
of returnees, and the newcomers,
look strong.

M

Enjoy
Join The

Yourself
Daily Staff

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Probably not a startling revelation when you think about it. The ex-
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