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September 10, 1968 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-10

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Tuesday, September 10, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tuesday, September 10, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

CHANDLER OUT?
" Wallace cancels press meeting,
postpones VP announcement

Primaries slated in nine states
today for November candidates

By The Associated Press
' George Wallace has canceled
a news conference in Washington
today where he was expected to
announce his choice of a running
mate on his third party ticket.
Aides refused to, comment on
whether the former Alabama gov-
ernor's ill health was connected
with the cancellation. Wallace has
been fighting a cold at his Mont-
gomery home since Saturday.
Reliable sources close to Wal-
lace had reported that A. B.
"Happy" Chandler, former Ken-
tucky governor and senator and
one-time baseball commissioner,
would be the choice unless some-
thing came up before the Wash-
ington news conference.
In Frankfort, Kentucky, Chand-
ler said yesterday that Wallace
has called off - for the time -

plans to announce Chandler as Chandler flirted with the Dixie-
his vice presidential choice. crats briefly in 1948 when they

"Temporarily, at least, it's off,"
he said. "I don't know if it'll ever
be on again - that remains to
be seen."
A few days ago, Chandler had
told a newsman he did not think
it strange that as a staunch civil
right advocate he was teaming
with a dedicated states rights
spokesman.
"I don't totally agree with ev-
erything he - Wallace - says,"
Chandler had said, "but I don't
always agree with my wife
either."
Actually, Chandler had added,
Wallace is not a racist but a
statesman with sound constitu-
tional views "and the most dy-
namic leader since John F. Ken-
nedy."

were led by Strom Thurmond of
South Carolina.
But during his second term as
governor, Chandler called but
soldiers to protect Negro children
when schools in two western Ken-
tucky communities were integrat-
ed.
He also opened state parks to
Negroes and appointed the first
Negro to the state board of edu-
cation.
"For 30 years," he said, "the
Democratic party has disagreed
on only one thing--me."
Last year, after losing a guber-
natorial primary, Chandler open-
ly declared his support for Re-
publican Louis B. Nunn.

By The Associated Press
Voters in nine states will select
nominees for the November gen-
eral election in primaries today.
All will choose candidates for the
U.S. House of Representatives. Six
will name party choices for the
U.S. Senate and six candidates for
governor.
Barry Goldwater, the defeated
Republican presidential candidate
In 1964, is unopposed for nomina-
tion to succeed retiring 90-year-
UCLA scienti

old Sen. Carl Hayden (D-Ariz.}.
Roy Ellison, Hayden's administra-
tive aide, is favored to win over
two other Democratic hopefuls
and face Goldwater in November.
All but Colorado and Maryland
will seek party choices for gover-
nor.
In Colorado, former Gov. Steve
McNichols is competing for the
Democratic senatorial nomination
against 39-year-old Ken Monfort,
a cattleman and a comparative
st proposes I

1 1
central donor kidney pool

newcomer to politics. The winner's
opponent will be Republican Sen.
Peter Dominick. McNichols backs
the Johnson administration policy,
on Vietnam while Monfort is con-
sidered a dove on the issue.
Vietnam also is an issue in Ver-
mont, where Republican Sen.
George D. Aiken is opposed for
renomination by William K. Tufts,
a hawk on Vietnam. The present
lieutenant governor, John J. Da-
ley, is unopposed for the Demo-
cratic nomination to succeed Dem-
ocratic Gov. Phillip Hoff. T h e
gubernatorial nomination is being
sought by two Republicans.
In Wisconsin, Bronson C. La
Follette, 32-year-old heir to the
state's famous political name,
seeks the Democratic nomination
for governor.
La Follette will be opposed by
Floyd Wills, a political unknown,
and La Follette is expected to win
handily. The incumbent governor,
Republican Warren P. Knowles,;
is unopposed.
In New Hampshire, Democratic
Gov. John W. King is running un-
opposed for the Senate. The race
to succeed him is wide open: five
Democrats and seven Republicans
are on the ballot.
In Maryland, incumbent Demo-
cratic Sen. Daniel B. Brewster ap-
pears to be a likely winner over
three primary rivals.

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40c off on any Medium, Pizza
2 cofo 30c off o n Chicken Dinners
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FREE DELIVERY and CARRY-OUT
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i

(Continued from Page 6)
ORGANIZATION
NOTI CES
UM Scottish Country Dance Society,
Dance meeting, Weds., 8:00 to 10:30
p.m., WAB' Lounge. Instruction given
-beginners welcome.
Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill St., All
those interested in Rosh Hashanana
Meals (Sun. NT Sept. 22nd; Mon. noon,
Sept. 23rd; Mon. NT Sept. 23rd; Tues.
noon, Sept. 24th. Must make reserva-
tions at 663-4129 no later than Monday,
Sept 16th.
Hillel Foundation,. 1429 Hill St., All
those planning on attending Tradi-
tional Rosh Hashanana and Yom Kip-
pur services at Hillel must make re-
servations by calling 663-4129.
UM Young Democrats meeting, Sept.
10th, 8:00 p.m. UGLI Multi-purpose
room 3rd floort speaker: former con-
gressman Weston E. Vivian, "The War
and the Urban Crisis".
UM Young Democrats Executive
Board Meeting, Sept. 10th, 4:00 p.m.,
2539 SAB. Topic: "The Chicago Conven-
tion and Election of 1968".
Bach Club Meeting, Thurs., Sept.
12th, 8:00 p.m. Guild House, 802 Mon-
roe St. Speaker: Dr. Richard Crawford,
"Bach as heard by Webern". Jelly do-
nuts and conversation afterwards. For
further information ,call 769-2922 or
769-4472.
American Institute of Industrial En-
0 gineers weekly luncheon, Sept. 10th, at
12 noon, 229 West Engin. Speaker: Prof.
James A. Gage "New I. E. Curriculum."

Placement
3200 S.A.B.
GENERAL DIVISION
Placement interviews: the following
Current Position Openings received
by General Division by mail and phone,
please call 764-7460 for further informa-
tion:
Harrisburg Area Community College,
Harrisburg, Pa.:. Assistant Librarian,
some reference, book selection, super-
vision of circulation duties, man or
woman, age pref. 22-35, multi-media,
exper. helpful.
City of Minneapolis: Supervisor,
Treatment, areas of social work, Ind.
and group counseling, education, re-
ligion, recreation, medical and dental
care of Division of Corrections, BA with
major in behavioral set., and min. 4
years exper. in counseling, probation,
or rehabilitation work, or MA and 2
years exper. Superintendent, Equip-
ment, engrg, pref ME or CE and 8 years
exper. District Recreation Supervisor,
degree in Rec., Phys. Ed., Elem. Ed.,
or Lib. Arts with specialization in some
area related to recreation and min. 5
years exper., or with MA and 2 years.
Fairfax Hall, Waynesboro, Virginia:'
Resident nurse for girls boarding
school of approx. 175, ages 9-12. Medical
facilities excellent.
Utah State Personnel Office: Volun-
teer services supervisor at State In-
ductrial School, degree in soc. sci.,
psych., G&C or rel. flds, some trng. or
exper. in volunteer admin.
Probate Court for Allegan County,
Mich.: Two positions, one M ofle F, as
Probation Officer. pref. soc. worker,
will consider bckrnds in teaching, law
enforcement, or other areas.
State of Michigan: Historian, BA
hist, for higher levels pref. exper in

Amer. or Mich. Hist, MS subs for ex-
per. at all levels.
Warren Consolidated Schools: super-
visor of payroll/accountant, man or
woman, need not have a degree, exper-
ience very important.
Independent Order of Foresters
(nothing to do with trees): Sales Re-
presentative, to sell memberships, trav-
eling, and film showing. Must have a
car and join organization. Male or fe-
male, at least high school degree, mar-
ried and over 25.
Turnbull and Schussele, Certified
Public Accountants: two or three open-
ings for men with succifient account.
credit to qualify for CPA exam.
Opportunities for Further Study and
Financial Aid: Please call 764-4760 for
complete information.
Danforth Graduate Fellowships f o r
Women, 1969-70: For women whoseI

NEW YORK ()') - A scientist
called yesterday for a national,
a n d eventually international,
pooling of cadaver kidneys so a
donor kidney could be flown to
the hospital where the most close-
ly matched recipient is waiting.
"The kidney should be taken
out and put in a box and shipped,
to wherever the patient is," he
said.
Dr. Paul I. Terasaki, an immun-
ologist at the School of Medicine,'
University of California at L o s
Angeles, made the recommenda-
tion at the Second International
Congress of the Transplantation
Society.
Donor kidneys cannot be ship-
ped now because procedures to
preserve them for longer than a
few hours have not yet been de-
veloped. In three cases, however,
recipients have been flown to the
hospital w h e r e a donor kidney
was to become available.
"It's very cumbersome to deal

whose white blood cells are mis-
matched.
Typing of white blood cells ap-
pears to be the key to long-term
acceptance of organ transplants,
he said.
In Los Angeles 2Q0 prospective
kidney recipients have been typed.
Forty transplants have been per-
formed and, 50 more are being
considered for transplants.
Seven hospitals in Los Angeles
are cooperating in the pool, Ter-
asaki said, and informal 11 n k s
with institutions around t h e
country are being set up.

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last chance!

UNION-LEAGUE

NORTH CAMPUS

TENNIS TOURNAMENT
MEN'S and WOMEN'S SINGLES
Sign up in UAC officesE
in Bursley Hall or the Union by 5 P.M. Weds.
INTERESTED IN SAVING MONEY? ;
BEAT THE HIGH COST OF LIVING ;
/ r
r Take this coupon to our store and receive on addi-
tional 10% CASH SAVINGS on all your beauty,
sundry and health needs./
This cash savings is in addition to our EVERY DAY .
LOW PRICES. Use this valuable coupon and save
rmoney./
TWhere Price and Quality Meet"
REGENCY DRUGS
123 EAST LIBERTY (Corner 4th)'
Ann Arbor, Michigan
* STORE HOURS: Monday thru Safurday 8:30 A.M.-6:00 P.M. s
/ Closed Sunday
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(This offer expires Sept. 30, 1968)
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academic careers, either study or teach- with this kind of thing," Terasaki
ing, have been interrupted for a min. told newsmen. He said his labor-
of 3 years at any stage, and have a atory and others are working on
Bachelors degree in any area are eligi-
ble for these fellowships amounting to the problem of storage and shipp-
an average of $3,000-$4,000 for the com- ing.
ing year. All applications and support-
ing documents (encl. portions of the Teraski reviewed 400 kidney
Grad. Record Exam). transplants from throughout the
September 16, 17 & 18, U. S. Navy: world and found, he saidthat
Dec., April and Aug. Grads, all deg. kidney transplant failures occur
levels, all majors for Navy OCS Pro-
grams, Surface and Air programs. much more often in patients
Form in
A A
BOWLING LEAGUE
for Wednesday Nights
Sign up at Michigan Union Bowling Lanes desk
A.B.C. Sanctioned
--SEE GEORGE
COME!..
HEAR . .
Former Con gressman
co
WESTON E. VIVIAN
DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE FROM THE
SECOND DISTRICT, MICHIGAN
TOPIC:
'The War and the Urban Crisis"
Tuesday, September 10
8 P.M.-UGLI MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
3rd floor

When doyou wear
a 4 "wide tie?

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. when you wear a 6-button,
double breasted shape
sportcoat or suit. Or plaid or
checked slacks.
Wide ties are great with
vested suits since more of the
tie shows. And they can be worn
with striped or checked shirts
r i a .. t ../ . rF- Y' r ~A '

Wide ties are in vogue for any
age. And should always be
worn with matching or coordi-
nating pocket squares.
If you have any further-ques-
tions about 4" wide ties ...
or slacks, sportcoats and suits
... ask at Wagner's. Our
nrnfacdinnal salemen will

r
''

Total Wardrobe Concept
for All Ages

I

I

.I

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