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September 10, 1968 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 10, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday1 September 10, 1968

M MP-

>thers, supervisors agree
welfare settlement terms

'U' Assembly N.Y. teachers strike

to debate

over job security

(Continued from page one)
funds allocated for emergency
purposes.
However, in testifying before
the fact-finding committee yester-'
day, Houston conceded it will be{
difficult to get the legislature to1
allocate supplementary funds.
"The Senate people," Rouston'
told the committee, "sain they
won't be able to make any cdanges
in present allocations."
State Rep. Farnsworth concur-
red, and said, "This year, everyone
felt that we did appropriate money
adequate for the job. We said
then, and we say now, there should I
absolutely be no need for supple-
mentary funds."
Houston later told the board,
although the state would retain
a "moral commitment" to pay the
40 per cent, if supplementary
funds did not supply the needs
of Wayne and Washtenaw coun-
ties, "we will have to make an
across-the-board cut."
The mothers feel the $91,000
won't be "used up and there will'
be funds left to subsidize our
needs." But they called the agree-
ment "below the minimum re-
quirements."
In Lansing, Charles Orlebeke,
special assistant to Gov. Romney,
said today "At no" time were na-
tional guards troops ever offered
for use in Washtenaw County."
Harrison had said Saturday,
Orlebeke had "apparently" offered
him the troops in a phone call
Friday.
Sixteen' of the 39 county super-
visors were present for the nego-
tiations, and their consensus that
the funds should be allocated will
be ratified by the larger board at
their meeting Sept. 6.

IA IVY UjIItll .U NEW YORK N) - The city's public schools closed, and more
11.1 million-pupil public school than 55,000 of its 60,000 teachers
(Continued from page' one) system was paralyzed on opening absent from classrooms.
up the proposed draft of bylaws day for the second straight year Nevertheless, Lindsay claimed a
was formed last May following yesterday by a teachers' strike. settlement had been reached in
dissatisfaction with the bylaw Less th a n 55,000 youngsters the decentralization dispute and
proposals drawn up by then-Vice showed up. asserted: "The schools are open.
President of Student Affairs Rich- Republican Mayor John V. Lind- There is no strike."
ard L. Cutler. The committee con- say became involved in a dispute "We don't know anything about
tains representatives of the stu- with union leaders after he claim- "edntkoayhgabu
dent body, faculty and adminis- edthe strike was over. They said it," replied a spokesman for the
tration. it was stillkn was n ove. hentid school district in dispute, Ocean
it ws stll o andcoul conI- Hill-Brownsville in Brooklyn.
SACUA plans to make no for- ue" today. Hil-Browns y Brklyn
mal recommendation on the T h e AFL-CIO United Federa- Later, Lindsay backed down and
course the faculty should take tion of Teachers struck in a de- his press office said: "Inadvert-
concerning the bylaw revision mand for job security, after 19 ently, he said there was no strike
other than to suggest that the fac- white teachers were ousted by the when, obviously, he meant there
ulty express its interest in the !local school board for allegedly was no reason for the illegal strike
matter and let their views be sabotaging a decentralized Negro- called by the union.
known. Puerto Rican district in Brooklyn, "When leaders of t h e Ocean
"We contemplate taking no for- an experimental unit. Hill-Brownsville governing board
mo fact ingop aeimmkna -an Nine of the teachers transferred agreed on Sunday that they would
Prof. Irving Copi, 'chairman of to other districts but the remain- not resist the return of the 10
SACUA, commented. "but we ing 10 demanded a hearing. They teachers ordered back to the dis-
would like to give Assembly mem- were subsequently cleared of the trict by the Board of Education.
,ers an opportunity to air their charges a n d ordered reinstated. Mayor Lindsay felt there was no

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1
it
7
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}

Call or Write:

views
Copi pointed out that the facul-
ty would probably not attempt to

The local board refused.
Citywide decentralization of
schools eventually is planned for
New York, with 33 community
boards exercising a large measure

reason for an illegal strike by the
teachers' union."j
Albert Shanker, UFT president
who served a jail term for last
year's teachers' strike. used bitter

Director of Nursing
Hawthorn Center
Northville Michigan
Telephone: Area Code
Fl 9-300 8 a.m. to

31 3-
4:30 p.m.

Voice' urges support
of AFSCME strike

(Continued from page one) 1
continued negotiations with the
University yesterday as the unions'
strike deadline of midnight to-
night approached.
The AFSCME includes all non-
skilled dormitory employes. i
Voice members noted that in
the past dorm residents have
vented their frustrations over the
reductions in service at the strik-
ing workers. r
In addition to the picnic, Voice
initiated plans for picketing withi
the strikers, leafletting and send-
ing speakers to speak with dorm
residents.
Plans for the proposed picnic
were not specific and several in-

fluential Voice members-includ-
ing Erie Chester, Grad, and Bruce
Levine, '71, said such a rally was
"an impossibility."
Levine pointed out that such a
picnic would draw few people un-
less the food were offered at no
cost. And, he added, Voice cannot
afford the expense of feeding
"5000 students."
Discussion of the strike also cen-
tered around the possibility for
organizing student employes into
a union, but Voice chose not to
attempt such action at this time.
Det. Lt. Eugene Staudenmaier
of the Ann Arbor Police sat in on
the entire Voice meeting with the
permission of the membership,

prepare its own version of sug-
gested bylaws. He did express
hope that the ad hoc committee
wouldmtake the views of the fac-
ulty members into consideration
when they prepare their proposed
draft.

I

i

r , t

TELL IT LIKE IT IS
U. of M.
for those who think about it
in the past, present and future
Lead your owncampus tour
Let both high school students
and alumni in on the truth'
about U. of M.

-- - - - - - - - - - - --,.EE~is w iw s4 iE yual.a l. , . A.
of control over their districts. words in denouncing Lindsay for -- j
The Board of Education report- Iwhathe called "union-busting
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i'

MASS MEETING
THURS., SEPT. 12 7:30 P.M.
UGLI Multi-Purpose Room
laternational Assoc. for the Exchange of
Students for Technical Experience

iNTERESTED?

Phone 764-0384

or drop in at Alumni Assoc. office,
ground floor of Union
Remember Student Governors

II ii

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IFC QUADRANGLE
INFORMATION PROGRAM
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10th
LEWIS HOUSE-BURSLEY 5TH FLOOR LOUNGE 6:30
VAN TYNE-MARKLEY 6:30
COOLEY HOUSE-E. QUAD 6:30
HUBER HOUSE-S. QUAD 6:30
PALMER HOUSE-LLOYD 6:30
MICHIGAN HOUSE-W. QUAD 6:30
ADAMS HOUSE-W. QUAD 7:00
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 11th
DOUGLAS HOUSE-BURSLEY 5TH FLOOR LOUNGE 6:30
FROST HOUSE-MARKLEY 6:30
HAYDEN HOUSE-S. QUAD 6:30
GOMBERG-KELSEY--S. QUAD 6:30
ALLEN-RUMSEY HOUSE-W. QUAD 6:30
THURSDAY, SEPT. 12th
BAR TLE T T HOUSE-BURSLEY 4TH FLOOR LOUNGE 6:30
an arI rW 1 1^1 N ,ia A A A nifI iJ'L.'7/1

Opposed
Humphreys

to;
Policy

on

I

i

and the

i"

-4

1 0

4

if you want to confront him as he
speaks on these issues, come to a
Mobilization-Students for McCarthy
meeting
TONIGHT at'8:00 P.M.

-

lull

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