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September 07, 1968 - Image 2

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, September 7, 1968

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Welfare

rights

supporters

face

trespass

c arges

' ashtenaw County Deputies confront welfare sympathizers

LOCAL GROUP

(Continued from Page 1)
had nothing to do with the use
of the North Campus building to
billet police.
University President Robben W.
Fleming also said he did not know
the building was being used to
house police.
Welfare recipients and their
supporters were protesting the
failure of the County Board of
Supervisors and the County Ways
and Means Committee (WMC) to
increase allocations for children's
school clothes.
The demonstrators returned yes-
terday expecting to meet again
with the supervisors. But the sup-
ervisors said they had made no
such promise and no meeting was
held.
At the request of the welfare
mothel-s, the students, led by Eric
Chester, chairman of New Politics,
and Bruce Levine, SGC adminis-
trative vice president, occupied
the corridors of the County Bldg.
after a march from the noon rally
on the diag.
At 2:30 p.m. Chester, Levine,
Fred LaBour, who were later ar-
rested, and Michael Davis and
Sharon Lowen of SGC, met with
T Washtenaw County Sheriff Doug-
las Harvey and Washtenaw Coun-
ty Prosecuting Attorney William
S. Delhey. Harvey informed them
that they would have to leave the
building or he would have it
cleared.
From 2:45 to 3:15 p.m. Chester
chaired a discussion among the
protesters whether to stay inside
and face arrest or to picket peace-
fully around the building.
During the discussion two con-
flicting statements from Mrs.
Shirley Haywood, spokesman for
the welfare recipients, were an-
nounced. Chester said she had
told him earlier she "didn't want
any students hurt or arrested."
However, Levine said Mrs. Hay-
wood had answered affirmatively
to his question whether the stu-
dents should sit-in.
The students then decided to
leave the building and by 3:30
p.m. the building had been effec-
tively cleared. Shortly after, how-
ever, Sannie Hampton and May
Easely, welfare recipients, ad-
dressed a group of students out-
side and appealed to them to sit-
in. Within minutes the first of
200 people began returning to the
building intending to be arrested.
They sat in two large groups in
the lob'by.
The second floor of the building
was cleared earlier and remailied
clear for the rest of the* day fol-
ing a report from Harvey that
the three circuit court judges-

James Breakey, William Agar, andF
John Conlin-had issued an order
prohibiting sitting-in. Harvey said
violators would be held in con-
tempt of court.
Delhey said later that no such
order had been issued.
At 3:50 Harvey announced he
would begin clearing the building
before the 5:30 closing. However,
no action was taken.
It was explained to the crowd
that those arrested before 5:30
would be charged with contention
-disrupting the normal opera-
tions of the County Bldg.-or dis-
orderly conduct. Those arrested
after the 5:30 closing of the
building would be charged with
trespassing.
Staudenmaier explained that:
the arrests would probably not be
made until after 5:30 because the
trespass charge is much easier to
prove than the disorderly conduct:
or contention charges.
Ann Arbor Chief of Police Wal-
ter Krasny concurred and added
that they also wanted to avoid
disrupting circuit court proceed-
ings which would be going on un-
til 5:30.
After 4 p.m. two Washtenaw
County deputies with rifles-a few
observers claimed they were M-
16's, which Harvey ordered some
time ago-were stationed on the
roof of the county jail, across
Main St. from the County Bldg.
Harvey said they were there to
deal with snipers.
At 5:20 a last attempt by Robert
Harrison, chairman of the county
supervisors, to avert the arrests
by compromising with the welfare'
mothers failed.
Before the arrests began, a filet
of 14 tactical police armed with
shotguns marched south on Main
St. with a police dog and then
east on Ann St., and lined-up
facing the building.
A few minutes lacer three sher-
iff's busses pulled in front of the
building as a double file of the
mixed police force began march-
ing over the same path the Oak-
latd deputies had taken. The lat-
ter headed into the building mo-
ments later.
At 5:30, Delhey read the follow-
ing statement to the crowd in the
lobby:
NATONAL GENERAL C
HE H L X
OVE R 111
OVER 375 No. MAPLE R
20th Century-Fox pr
"THE SECRET L
C AN AMERICAN
SCOLOR BY DELUXE

"This building is now officially
closed. You are ordered to leave.
You have five minutes. After five
minutes those here will be ar-*
jested on tiespass charges."
No one left. About ten minutes
later a mixed force of Washtenaw
County she: iff's deputies and po-
lice from Dexter, Milan and Saline
fi'ed in and be-an dragging and
esco ting students from the build-
ing
No Ann At bor oolice were in-
volved in the arrests.
Most of the first persons re-
moved did not struggle. Of the
182 three fought back, were each
subdued forcefully and carried out
by four or five officers.
For the most part the officers'*
seemed to avoid excessive force.
Excess force was consistently
used, however, against those who
showed any symbolic resistance,
such as forming a "V" with their
first two fingers.
As two police men struggled
with, one man near the end of *
the arrests, a student still to be
arrested shouted, "Kill the pigs!"
An unidentified officer imme-
diately grabbed him from behind
with a riot stick pressed across
his throat. Four more officers
thengrabbed him, and he was
carried out.#
After the building had- been
closed and sealed off by deputies,
Harvey turned to clearing a crowd
of well over 1,000 people inr front
of the building which was over-
flowing the intersection at Main
and Ann streets. The officers-
mostly Washtenaw deputies --4
formed shoulder-to-shoulder bar-
ricades on three sides of the
'building.
The deputies were armed with
three-foot riot sticks and many
were carrying riflesrand shotguns.
Two police dogs were kept in the
area.
At one point, the 14 Tactical
Mobile Force members pointed
their guns at a segment of the
crowd close to the County Bldg.
entrance after Harvey told the
people to move back.
The officers and deputies had
left the area by 6 p.m., entering
the County Bldg. and emerging
from the Ann St. exit.

School grooms future college executives

By DAVID SPURR
Student radicals on campus have
expressed fear that the recent appoint-
ments of top University officials with
backgrounds in labor-mediation and
"big government" heralds the advent of
a new breed of administration - the
wheeler-dealer concerned less with the
University as an academic institution
than as a big business.
But very few of those who are involved
in a university institution called the Cen-
ter for the Study of Higher Education
(CSHE) have such a fear.
Founded by a former president of An-
tioch College and now headed by one of
its own alumni, the CSHE grooms a select
bunch of top-caliber students for high
administrative positions in, colleges and
universities.
James L. Miller, Jr., director of the
CSHE, feels, "The university today is
every bit as complex as a large govern-
mental unit. The administrator has to
make the organization responsive to a
certain set of values-academic freedom,
the search for knowledge, the importance

of educational enterprise-and this re-
quiies certain managerial skills.
"To have an' administration with those
skills and without those values is to have
a Frankenstein."
The atmospheTre at the CHSE is in-
formal. The stddents have varied back-
grounds and a multitude of different rea-
sons for enrolling.
They take courses like, "Education and
Nation-Building," and, "Philosophy of
Education."
In the afternoons many of them con-
gregate for bull sessions' over coffee at
their "Corner House," across the street
from the Center's headquarters in a bank
building on South University. There are
Tuesday Evening Seminars at Metzger's,
too.
At one of these bull sessions a gradu-
ate in biology is quite likely to be found
arguing about the Columbia student re-
bellion with a Harvard dean. It is im-
possible to label the institution as radical
or conservative in thought because its
students and faculty represent such a
wide range of interests.

Bill Lombus, in his middle thirties, is
one of the CSHE's younger students. An
Antioch graduate with a master's in
medieval history from Notre Dame, he
came to Ann Arbor dissatisfied with what
he called the "lack of perspective, the
restrictiveness, and the inflexibility" of
most university administrations.
Another student, Tom Maher, who
holds a master's in Public Health, ex-
presses "basic dissatisfaction with the
undergraduate process. We at the Uni-
versity graduate a lot of people who are
anti-intellectual and intolerant in their
attitudes."
The CSHE, with its informal discus-
sions and flexible curriculum (each stu-
dent's curriculum is worked out to fit
his own needs-no two are the same),
may well serve as a microcosmic model
for the University. The Center is par-
ticularly proud of its Student Advisory
Board, which after only two years of
existence has already proved itself power-
ful in the selection and evaluation of
faculty members.
Set up in 1958 with Carnegie Corpora-

tion funds, along with two other similar
centers at Berkeley and Columbia, the
CSHE has differed from those two coun-
terparts by placing much more emphasis
on teaching than on research.
Since then it has grown every year,
and now has about 125 full and part-
time students. Many of the students are
deans or administrative assistants from
other colleges and universities, and most
of them are placed into top administra-
tive posts when they matriculate.
"We emphasize the understanding of
complex organizations," Miller said. "The
old practice of simply placing the chair-
man of the English department in an
administrative position just won't do."
Above all, faculty and their students,
referred to often as "colleagues," seek to
create academic institions which are re-
sponsive to social change. Miller said,
"Change does not need to precipitate vio-
lence. It takes intelligence. Students are
entering more and more into the deci-
sion-making process of the university-
this is inevitable and desirable in brder
that they become full members of the
academic community."

RD.-*769.1300

WED.-FRI.
7:15-9:15
SAT-SUN.
1:30-3:25-5:20
7:15-9:15

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:.:: -:

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
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Sent in TYPEWRITER form to
Room 3528 L. S. & A. Bldg., be-
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publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published ,a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only,,
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7
Day Calendar
Cinema Guild: Akira Kurosawa's The
Seventh Samurai: Architecture Audi-
torium, 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
General Notices
TV Center Programs: On Sunday,
Sept. 8 the following programs produc-
ed by the TV Center will have t Ih e i r
initial telecast in Detroit 11:00 a.m.,
WJBK TV, Channel 2: "How You Play
the Game." Don Canham discusses the
changing game of football since 1920
with Bennie Oosterbaan, and Bump
Elliott.
Elliott. 12:00 Noon, WWJ TV, Channel
4: "In-Out-Round-About: Television."
TV. is one of the most significant forces
in our lives. Critics and professionals
evaluate its import and impact.
Doctoral
Examinations
Philip Reese Bjork, Geology, Dis-
sertation: "The Carnivora of the
Hagerman Local Fauna (Late Pliocene)
of Southwestern Idaho," at 8 a.m.,
Saturday, September 7, in Room 2045
Natural Science, Chairman: C. W. Hib-
bard.
Robert Louis Morasky, Education,
Dissertation: "Discrimination Pro ram-
ming as a Behavioral Control Tech-
nique," on Saturday, September 7
at 9 a.m. at 1610 Washtenaw, Chair-
man: D. E. P. Smith.
James Joel Helm, Classical Studies,
Dissertation: "Demetrius Triclinius and
the Textual Tradition of the Orestela,"
on Saturday, September 7 at 10 am.
G. F. Else.'
in Room 2020 Angell Hall, Chairman:
George Gustave Zipfel, Jr., Physics,
Dissertation: "A Model for Pion Pro-
duction. in Proton-Proton Scattering,"
an Saturday, September 7 at 10 a.m. in
Room 618 Physics-Astronomy Bldg.,
Gail Carol Annabel Cook, Economics,
Chairman: M. H. Ross.
Dissertation: "7ffect of Federation on

Education Expenditures in Metropoli-
tan Toronto," on Monday, Sept. 9 at
2 p.m. in Room 107 Economics Bldg.
Chairman: H. E. Brazer
Placement
3200 S.A.B.
GENERAL DIVISION
Placement interviews: the following
representatives will be at the Bureau
of Appts.: Please call 763-1363 at
your earliest convenience for appoint-
ments. All representatives expect to see
a vita sheet on interviewees, if you
are not already registered in the Gen-
eral Division, please ask us to provide
you with the proper materials. Inter-
view smhedules open Monday, Sept. 9.
September 16, 17, and 18:
U. S. Navy: Dec., April, and Aug.
Grads, all degree levels, all majors for
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Graduate Outing Club, Hiking, camp-
ing, swimming, etc. Bring swim suit.
Meets every Sunday at 2:00 p.m. at
Huron Street side of tge Rackham
Bldg.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw: Sunday Service at 9:30
and 11:00 a.m. Rev. Alfred T. Scheips,
Pastor - Sermon: "Courage to Say No,"
Communin in 9:30 service.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student Or-
ganization: Supper Program at 1511
Washtenaw, Sept. 8th at 6:00 p.m.
Speaker: Rev. David Eberhard, Candi-
date for Detroit Common Council,
"Christians and Politics".
Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill Street,
Sunday, Sept. 8th, Israeli Folk Danc-
ing, 2 - 4 p.m. and coffee House
(Delicatessen) 6:00 p.m.
UM Young Americans for Freedom
and UM Society of Classical Liberalism,
joint meeting, Sunday, Sept. 8th, 3:00
p.m., 3 r-s Union organizational meet-
ing.
UM Young Democrats meeting, Sept.
gressman Weston E. Vivian, "The aWr
10th, 8:00 p.m. UGLI Multi-purpose
room 3rd floor, speaker former con-
and the Urban Crisis".
UM Young Democrats Executive
Board meeting, Sept. 10th, 4:00 p.m.
2539 SAB, topic "The Chicago Conven-
tion and Election of 1968."
U Fellowship, Huron Hills Baptist
Church, Ann Arbor, YM-YWCA Sun-
days: coffee, 9:30 a.m. Bible discussion,
9:45 a.m. New study series on the gospel
of Luke: "The Life of Jesus as seen
through the Eyes of a Scientist." Lead-
er: Ward Wilson.
Bach Club Meeting, Thurs., Sept.
12th, 8:00 p.m. Guild House, 802 Mon-

roe. Speaker: Dr. Richard Crawford,
"Bach as heard by Webern". Jelly do-
nuts and conversation afterwards. For
further information call 769-2922 or
Sheila at 769-4472.
Navy OCS Programs, Surface and Air
programs.
Current Position Openings received
by General Division by mail and phone,
please call 764-7460 for further in-
formation:
City of Warren Civil Service Com-
mission, Mich.: Chief of the Court,
degree and 10 years exper in court
admin.
County of Wayne, Mich.: Accountant
and Personal Property Examiner, BA,
acctg. degree or 'CPA.
Ralston Purina Company, St. Louis,
Mo.: Assist to Mgr, of Bank relations,
BA in econ. or bus., with acctg. courses,
bank exper pref. Packaging Engr., de-
gree and interest in pckg. Food Tech.,
oil-based foods. Operations Research
degree and exper with dry mix and
Analyst, MA and 2 years indust or con-:
culting exper, Fortran exper.
Review Office Supervisor, degree and
State of Connecticut: Design and
3 years in arch., engrg.,,or construc-
tion, 2 years supv.

ETI N,
Meijer, Inc., Grand Rapids, Mich.
Asst. Sporting Goods Buyer, buying
exper and knowl of sporting goods.
International Institute, Flint, iMch.:
Plan activities for foreign vigitors from
about 75 natons, students, refugees,
hospital staff and immigrants. BA req.,
MA pref., family, with languages, arts/
crafts, music/dancing/sports/games.
Ayerst Laboratories, local positions
of a N.Y. based firm: Pharmaceutical
Representatives, BS, no exper necess.
State of Wisconsin: Executive Budget
and Mgnt. Officer, Bureau of the Mrd-
get, Madison, Wis., MA in planning,
publ. admin and 2 years professional
exper, at senior level of independent
performance, apply before Sept. 16.
Publications Editor, Wis. State Uni-
versity, Stevens iPoint, degree in Engl.
or Journ, and 2 years exper, apply be-
fore Sept. 9. Regional Day Care Super-
visor, Health and Social Services, Div.
of Family Services, MA in nursery
school ed., child dev., or MSW and
3 years exper. Apply before Sept. 12.
Summer Placement Service Room 212
S.A.B., lower level, hours 10 - 12 a.m.
and 1:30 - 5 p.m. Mon. - Fri. Open now
for information and browsing, services.

(~AI

"EXCEPTIONALLY POWERFUL, IN
BOTH CONCEPTION AND
EXECUTION! A HIGH LEVEL OF
CREATIVE CINEMA!"
-Time Magazine
"DAZZLING AND TO THE POINT!"
-Penelope Gilliatt, The New Yorker
"BRILLIANTI REMARKABLE!"
xJoseph Morgenstern, Newsweek
"FEW FILMS ARE WORTHY OF
BEING CALLED ARTISTIC. THIS
IS ONE! Brilliantly accomplithed!"
-Hollis Alpert, Saturday Review

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IMPUSI

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IN PERSON
B. KING
at the GRANDE BALLROOM, Detroit
Friday, Saturday, Sunday
Grand River at Beverly, 1 block south of Joy
834-4904

NEXT-"PRUDENCE AND THE PILL"

I

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Directed by Akiro Kurosawa, 1 954
"Kurosawa's most vital picture . . . perhaps
the best Japanese film ever made."
CArTInID A e 0 CIILIlA V4

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A CARLO PONTI PRESENTATION
DISTRIBUTED BYX SIGMA I. A FILMWAYS COMPANY
" ZORJBA THE GREEK'
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Anthony Quinn's Zorba
possesses all the energies
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"A grand uproarious
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-Time Magazine
-Anthony Quinn, best actor
of the year ! Zorba, one of
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-National Board of Review
1964's finest film."
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5th ANDWEEK!

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Rahn M Johnfl I slavets

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