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April 11, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-11

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NOW FOR VILLGE
SHOWING 375 No. MAPLE RD.-7694300

TIMES
1:00-3:00-5:10
7:20-9:30

page three

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

"'MA'S'H' is what
the new freedom
of the screen
is all about."
Richard Schickel, Life
An Ingo Preminger Production
Color by DE LUXE*
PanavisionO

Saturday, April 11, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

the
news ntoday
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Five-week

TA

strike at

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April 11, 12-Sat., Sun.
THE PUBLIC ENEMY
dir. WILLIAM WELLMAN (1931)
See gangster James Cagney stuff a grape-
fruit into a girl's face.
SHORT: PEOPLES' PARK
7 & 9:05 Architecture
662-8871 75c Auditorium

THE SPACE AGENCY gave a go-ahead for today's launching
of Apollo 13 to the moon with backup astronaut John Swigert Jr.
Earlier this week the Apollo mission had faced the possibility
of being canceled when one of the crew members, Thomas Mattingly,
came down with the German measles.
Less than 24 hours before the scheduled blastoff, NASA admin-
istrators decided to continue the mission with Swigert substituting
for the sick astronaut.
The countdown for the Apollo 13 mission is proceeding towards:
a scheduled liftoff today at 2:13 p.m.
* * * '
THE SENATE FOREIGN RELATIONS COMMITTEE un-
animously approved a resolution that would terminate the 1964
Gulf of Tonkin resolution.
The resolution was the basis for the Johnson's administration's
dispatch of 500,000 troops to Vietnam.
The committee agreed after the Nixon administration advised it
would have no objection to repealing the resolution.
The legal impact is questionable since the Nixon administration
has said it does not regard the Tonkin Gulf resolution as the legal
basis for current U.S. activities in southeast Asia.
It was passed in August of 1964 at the request of former Presi-
dent Lyndon B. Johnson in the wake of alleged North Vietnamese
attacks on U.S. ships in the Gulf of Tonkin off the Vietnamese coasts.'

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Wisconsin ends
By NADINE COHODAS
A five week strike by the 970-member Teaching Assist-
ants Association at the University of Wisconsin ended Thurs-
day after the union voted 534-348 to approve a contract by
the university Wednesday.
The teaching assistants had been striking to establish
student input in curriculum decisions, better grievance pro-
cedures, smaller classes, and four-year appointments.
The university's proposal includes a section stating that
if the TA's accept the proposed contract, the faculty will
establish mechanisms for student input in curriculum decis-
ions, and better grievance procedures.
The university's board of re- --

-Associated Press
Teachers Lgo on strike

BURTON
GENEVIEVE
BUJOLD
HAL IN THE
H ALWLS PRODUCTION
. nne gf
je fousartz s
A VVERSAL PICTURE t . CHICOLO R PANAVIS0g
SHOWS AT
1 :10-3:40,-6:15-9:001

"EPIC BATTLE OF THE SEXES."
-Vincent Canby,/N.Y. Times
"HAS THAT YOUTHFUL
ACCENT WHICH PLACES IT IN A
LEAGUE WITH ZEFFIRELLI'S
'ROMEO AND JULIET.'"
-John Mahoney, FM and Fine Arts Mag.
"AN INSTANT CLASSIC .."
-Archer Winsten, N.Y. Post
"A PERFECT MOVIE... RICHARD
BURTON, CHARMING, ROMANTIC.
GENEVIEVE BUJOLD, FLIRTY.
THEY'RE GREAT TOGETHER!"
-Cosmopolitan Magazine

THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF have urgeda two-month
delay in further U.S. troop withdrawals from Vietnam.
Pentagon sources said the military chiefs, concerned about rising
enemy offensive action, made their recommendation within the past
few days. They said that the Nixon administration will go ahead with
a further trooop cut anyway.

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Minneapolis teachers picket outside school buildings as students
enjoy the unscheduled vacation. About 2,500 teachers are striking
for higher wages and more fringe benefits. See News Today.
TEAMSTERS STRIKE:
Lockout in Chicago,
vandalism ino Penn

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STRIKING SCHOOL TEACHERS closed schools in Minnea-
polis, Minn., Muskogee, Okla., and Butte, Mont. yesterday.
In separate disputes ranging from wages to failure to desegregate,
over 2600 Minneapolis teachers shut down half of the city's 100
public schools.
In other labor disputes, the New York Times said it was "rapidly
approaching" the point where it would have to halt publication be-
cause of slowdown tactics by the printers union, one of 10 unionss
negotiating contracts with New York's four largest newspapers.
That action, and a threatened strike 'by the American Newspaper
Guild against the New York Post on Monday, could lead to a city-
wide newspaper blackout.
ATTY. GEN. JOHN MITCHELL has hired a press secretary
for his wife, Martha.
The decision to hire a press secretary came shortly after the
Arkansas Gazette in Little Rock reported that Mrs. Mitchell had
telephoned the newspaper to criticize Sen. J. W. Fulbright (D-Ark)
for his vote against G. Harrold Carswell's nomination to the Supreme
Court.
"I want you to crucify Fulbright and that's that," Mrs. Mitchell
told the newspaper.
Mrs. Mitchell, a native of Arkansas, said Fulbright was "notl
representing the people" of his state in voting to reject President
Nixon's nomination of Carswell.
AN ABORTION REFORM LAW passed the New York State
Assembly last Thursday and was approved by the Senate yester-
day.
The bill would allow an abortion for any reason up to the 24th
week of pregnancy and after that only to save the woman's life.
Immediately after the voting in the Senate was taken a spokes-
man for Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller said he would sign it.
* * *
PREMIER GEORGE PAPADOPOULOS announced yesterday
the partial restoration of civil liberties in Greece. -
At the same time, Papadopoulos told Greece's "friends" and
"enemies" to leave his regime alone.
Papadopoulos announced an end to arbitrary arrests and the
return of habeas corpus; restriction of military courts solely to cases
involving security offenses; restoration of freedom of speech and
assembly; and the release of more than 350 political detainees.

L

1

gents met yesterday and confirm-
ed the new 17-month contract by
an 8-2 vote. At the regents meet-
ing a spokesman for the state at-
torney general said the university
was going ahead with contempt
citations against 19 TA's for violat-
ing the injunction enjoining them
from striking.
In addition, he said, orders are
being readied for an additional
10 TA's to appear in court Tues-
day to show cause why they should
not be held in contempt of court
for violating the injunction.
Court proceedings originally had
been scheduled for today but were
postponed.
Also at the regents meeting uni-
versity Chancellor Edwin Young
said "The strike gained nothing.
Those who gained are those who
want confrontation politics for its
own sake. Contempt citations will
be very sobering indeed."
At a rally Thursday announc-
ing the end of the strike, TAA
President Robert Muehlenkamp
said, "We have a few protections
and mechanisms, and we're going
to run every goddamn complaint
through the grievance committee.
"What the faculty did to intimi-
date students was the most they
could have done," Muehlenkamp
added.
The faculty did not support the
striking TA's and reportedly open-
ly supported the university's posi-
tion. Later in the strike, the uni-
versity was reported to be ready
to hire outside teachers to re-
place the striking TA's.
The strike, which had kept as
much as 80 per cent of the Liter-
ature and Science School out of
class, began March 7 after nego-
tiations with the university over a
new contract broke down.

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FACES

directed by JOHN CASSAVETES
A dramatic cinema Vertie style look at
middle class America.
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
APRIL 10 11,1--Fri., Sal., Sun.

By The Associated Press
Fighting and vandalism devel-
oped yesterday in Pennsylvania as
a widespread Teamsters strike
continued, while employers in Chi-
cago called for a lockout in re-,
taliation against union strategy.
Five major Chicago groups or-
dered the lockout against 32,000
drivers after a sixth carriers'
group signed a contract calling for
pay hikes substantially higher
than a tentative national agree-:
ment.
Union and industry spokesmen
differed on the effect of the lock-
out order.
In western Pennsylvania, police
reported roving bands of steel
haulers picketing terminals and
attempting to stop truck traffic.
Authorities said they received re-
ports of fighting, vandalism, at
least one shooting and a hit-and-
run accident in which a man was
injured seriously. State police pa-
trols 6n the Pennsylvania Turn-
pike were doubled.
The contract signed Thursday
in Chicago by the Illinois Motor
Truck Operators Association pro-
vides wage increases of $1.65 an
hour over three years. It covers
8,000 drivers.
A tentative national contract
agreed on in negotiations last
week in Washington calls for pay
raises of $1.10 an hour.
A trucking industry spokesman
said in Washington carrier repre-
sentatives met with Frank E. Fitz-
simmons, acting president of the
Teamsters, late Thursday and
"both major parties are standing
by the agreement."
The new Chicago contract pro-
vides wage increases five cents
short of what the unions demand-
ed in independent negotiations
and is 95 cents more than the
other Chicago area trucking asso-
ciations offered for the three-year
span.
Violence also broke out in other
parts of the nation.
Police in Painesville, Ohio, ar-
rested six employes of a Cleveland
trucking firm after a bullet struck
a rental truck driven by manage-
ment trainees of a rubber firm
transporting tires. In Huron Coun-
ty, four rear tires on a moving
truck were shot out, and police in-
vestigated reports of tire punc-

tures on rigs parked at a truck'
stop.
A walkout of drivers in Kansas
City shut down operations of 12
freight yards and affected opera-
tions of more than a dozen west-
ern Missouri truck lines.
Some 2,000 Ford Motor Co. em-
ployes in Cleveland were laid off
because of a parts shortage. They
joined nearly 30,000 other auto
workers idle in3DetroithandSt.
Louis.
A meeting was planned in Los
Angeles, where Teamsters officials
hoped to convince some 18,000
striking driversdto return to work
by the weekend.
In Dallas, although there were
no strikes by drivers, hundreds of
workers had been laid off their
jobs with more expected to join
them today after being paid.

Kirk takes integration
di~spute to high court

Senators
deny bas
accusation
WASHINGTON () - President
Richard Nixon's accusation of
Senate prejudice against Su-
preme Court nominees from the
South prompted two resolutions
in the Senate challenging the
charge of regional bias.
In making the accusation Nix-
on said he would nominate a ju-
dicial conservative from outside
the South
Sen. Albert Gore (D-Tenn.),
who seeks re-election, and who
with three other Southerners
voted against the Supreme Court
nomination of G. Harrold Cars-
well, proposed that t h e Senate
reject by resolution the Nixon ac-
cusation of bias.
His resolution terms the Nixon
statement "an assault on the in-
tegrity of the Senate."
"As long as the Senate is con-
stituted the way it is today, ,I will
not nominate another Southerner
and let him be subjected to the
kind of malicious character as-
sassination accorded both Judge
Haynsworth and Judge Carswell,"
Nixon said.
The Gore resolution would de-
clare "the characterization of the
Senate as contained in said state-
ment is hereby rejected."
Deputy White House press sec-
retary Gerald Warren said Nixon
did not intend to "impugn the in-
tegrity of the Senate or any mem-
bers of the Senate.
"I am confident the Senate will
reject the resolution drafted in
the heat of the Senate's reaction,"
Warren said.
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.),
introduced a resolution pronounc-
ing it "the sense of the Senate
that it ishprepared to advise and
consent to nominees for the Su-
preme Court from any section of
the United States," which Sens.
Birch Bayh (D-Ind.) and Edward
W. Brooke (R-Mass.) joined him
in sponsoring.
Both resolutions were referred
to the Senate Judiciary Commit-
tee headed by Sen. James East-
land (D-Miss.) w h o strongly
backed both Haynsworth a n d
Carswell.
Twenty senators who voted
against Carswell, Haynsworth or
both signed a letter to Nixon de-
nying that regional discrimination
had anything to do with their op-
position.
"We are prepared to support
the nomination of a Southerner
who is a strict constructionist pro-
vided he meets the high legal, ju-
dicial and ethical standards which
we believe are required for the
Supreme Court," they said.
Sen. Robert P. Griffin of Michi-
gan, the Republican whip, said
geography was indeed a factor in
the Carswell defeat.

7 & 9:30 P.M.

75c

---

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ACADEMY AWARD
WINNER
BEST FOREIGN
FILM

_ __ _
14,

WASHINGTON (W) - G o v.
Claude Kirk of Florida took his
fight over integration of Manatee
County public schools to the Su-
preme Court yesterday and prom-
ised to obey any order the justices
might issue.
Kirk's attorneys told the court.
"there is grave danger of loss of
life" among federal and state of-
ficials pitted against each other
in the integration dispute.".
The attorneys said that all
dangers of breakdown of lawful
procedures can be avoided if the
court gives Kirk and the state the
"dignity" of a hearing.
Twice this week Kirk suspended
the county school board as it pre-
pared to implement a desegrega-
tion plan ordered by U.S. District
Judge Ben Krentzman.
The governor had been ordered
to appear in Krentzman's court in
Tampa yesterday afternoon to
show cause why he should not be
held in contempt.
Kirk repeatedly told a news
conference Thursday night that
the dispute was not between him

and the federal district court, but
between the State of Florida and
the United States. The question
can be settled only by the Supreme
Court, he said.
Kirk asked the Supreme Court
to transfer the dispute away from
Judge Krentzman's court on the'
theory that the Supreme Court,
under the Constitution, must as-
sume original Jurisdiction:.
The governor's lawyers said he
"stands willing to obey any order
which this court shall issue after
hearing and will immediately re-
instate the board of public instruc-
tion and superintendent of public
instruction of Manatee County,
should this court issue, after hear-
ing, an order so requiring."
The motion was violating the
constitutional rights of the child-
ren who would be bused away
from their neighborhood schools
because the busing was based on
their race, Krentzman said.
The motion said Kirk's lawyers
"will be in constant contact with
the clerk's office."

"7Z' damn near
knocks you out
of your seat."
-Pauline Kael, The
New Yorker

"The last word
in thrillers.
Terrific."
-Gene Shaoit, LOOK MAGAZINE

"Enough intrigue
and excitement to
eclipse James Bond."
-PLAYBOY

&30

NORMAN
KENNEDY
Scotland's finest
traditional singer

U

1411 RIll STREET
"II'S
ia

sings a song of Revolution unlike any that's ever been sung . .. a movie about things
comngtogether. Sheer genius! Godard uses a Rolling Stones recording session as a
grand metaphor for growth; he devotes half the movie' s running time to this. An auda-
cious work of art; brilliant! -Joseph Morgen Newsweek; March 30
It haunts the memory so effectively and grows, in retrospect, into a movie experience of
major importance. A Rock fugue . . . so beautifully and carefully composed.
-Vincent Canby New York Times; March 29, 1970
SyMPAT7' for iE IEvi(
wi4h 1 RolIkn, Srow's ,
a new feature film by Jean-Luc Godard,
Starring Mick Jagger, Brian Jones.
Keith Richatd, Charlie Watts, Bill Wymnun,

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