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April 10, 1970 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-10

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1970 1

Page Two,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, April 10, '

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, April 10, 1970

poetry and prose-
Hopwood awards given

theatre
Somebody': Dramatic honesty

Awards totaling $24,650 were
given to 28 winners in the an-
nual Avery and Julie Hopwood
Contest in creative writing at
the University Wednesday night.
The Hopwood Awards, among
the largest cash awards for cre-
ative writing in t h e country,
are now in their 40th y e a r.
They come from an endowment
fund bequeathed by playwright
Avery ,Hopwood a n d vary in
amount according to the qual-
ity of the work.
This year there were 16 ma-
jpr and 12 minor awards in the
fields of fiction, drama, poetry
and essay. Major contest prizes
totaled $17,800 and minor $6,-
850.
Prof. Robert: F. Haugh, Hop-
wood Committee chairman, an-
nounced the winners in a cere-
'mony in Rackham Lecture Hall.
The annual Hopwood Lecture
was given by novelist Nadine
Gordimer, whose subject was
"Themes and Attitudes in Mod-
ern African Writing."
Largest prize winner was Max
I. Apple, grad. Apple won three
major awards: $1,200 in the
fiction, short story division for
"Five Short Stories;" $1,000 in
the essay division for "Essays
on Fiction;" and $750 in fiction
(novel) for A Peripheral History
of the Russo-Japanese War.
The largest single prizes, $2,-
000 each, went to Ransom Jef-
frey, grad, in major drama for
Three Plays, and to Lawrence
M. Joseph, '70, in major poetry
for "18 poems.",
In the major drama division,
in addition to the award to Jef-
frey, an award of $1,000 went to
Lawrence E. Kasden, '70, f o r
Just This; $700 to Glo r i a J.
Briskin, grad, for Let's Wave
Goodbye; $700 to Mrs. Patricia
Griffith, grad, for Three Plays;
a n d $700 to Sylvia Bandyke,
grad, for Plays.
In the major essay division,
in addition to Apple's award,
awards of $750 went to Mrs.
Marilyn Rosenthal for. "Where
Rumor Raged" and to David B.
Espey, grad, for "Heart of,
Darkness Revisited."
In the major fiction division
(novel), there were three

awards. In addition to Apple's
award, an award of $1,000 went
to John A. Shtogren, grad, for
W. C.; and $750 to Peter D.
Brett, grad, for Crossing Para-
dise.
In the major fiction' division,
(short story), three prizes were
given. In addition to Apple's
award, prizes of $750 went to
Kalian D. Liston, '70, for "Lis-
tening Post" and Ira N. Eisen-
stadt, '70, for "Paper Bags."
In the major poetry division
in addition to Joseph's award,
three others were given. Joseph
Salerno, grad, received $1,500
for "Edges;" 'Jeffrey A. Justin,
g r a d, received $750 for "Si-
rens" and Dianne Pinkley, grad,
received $750 for "Baptisms."
Graduate studfnts are allow-
ed to compete in the major di-
vision. Undergraduates are eli-
gible only for minor Hopwood
awards. Seniors may compete in
either contest'
In the minor drama division
there were three awards. Gail
D. Lenhoff, '70, received $700
for Rasputin; Meredith W. Be-
thune, '71, won $500 for Echoes
of Dust and Richard L. Lees,
'70, received $500 for With Help
from Above.
In the minor essay division
there were three awards. Mitch-
ell Halberstadt, '71, received
$600 for "Varieties of the Amer-
ican Experience;" $500 went to
both Philip B. Ardell, '70, for
"Collected Essays on Literary
Subjects;" and Stephen Welk-
om, '70, for "Literary Essays."
Three awards were also given
in the minor fiction division.
David W. Eaton, '71, received
$600 for "News from Saigon;"
$500 went to Suasan B. Miller,
'73, for "The Wild Garden," and
Brian W. Sutton, '70, for "Three
Stories."
In the minor poetry division.
there were three awards. Jane
J. Kenyon, '70, received $750
for "Dream of Getting Under."
$600 went to Rochelle A. Sie-
gel. '72, for "The Slow River"
and to Lawrence I. Russ, '72, for
"Smoke."
Judges in the drama division
were Dan Sullivan, drama critic
for The Los Angeles Times, and

Robert G. Shedd, of the Univer-
sity of Maryland, fornmer Hop-
wood winner. Judges in the es-
say division were former Hop-
wood winners Baxter Hathaway,
professor of English, Cornell
University and Dorothy Mc-
Guigan, author of T h e Haps-
burgs. In the fiction division
(novel) were Joyce C. Oates,
novelist and short story writer
and winner of t h e National
Book Award this year and Mil-
dred Walker, author of ten no-
vels and former Hopwood win-
ner. In the fiction (short story),
division, judges were Padma
Perera, short story writer and
Jean Stafford, novelist a n d
former Hopwood winner and
short story: writer. In the poe-
try division, judges were Rob-
ert Bly, poet and editor, and
former fopwood winner, poet
X: J. 'Kenn'edy.
A program, "Beethoven in
Song," will be given by four
members of music school faculty
at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 9, in
Rackham Lecture Hall.,
Ralph Herbert, baritone, P a u 1
Boylan, piano, Jerome Jelinek,
cello, and Gustave Rosseels, vio-
lin, will participate.
The concert will be open to
the public free of charge.
Herbert will sing "Five Songs,"
a collection for which Christian
Gellert wrote the words; "Song
Cycle An Die Ferne Geliebte",
words by A. A. Jeitteles; a group
of songs, with words by J. W.
Gothe and Herrosen; and Scot-
tish, Irish and English Folk-
songs, with cello, violin, a n d
piano.

By DEBORAH LINDERMAN
NEW YORK - No Place to
be Somebody, an extraordinary
first play by Charles Gordone,
has attained t h e status of a
"long-run." Having opened in
the Public Theatre last spring,
it has now moved uptown and
is installed in the Promenade, a
theater in the west 70's which
was filled - at least the night
I saw it-- with a sizeable mixed
audience looking (unusually)
not-so-middle class.
That this play is so success-
ful is significant because it is'
neither a black power drama
nor a black melodrama - the
chic two current forms of black
theater - which is to say, I
suppose, that it plays neither
on white guilt n o r on black
melancholy. Moreover, it is not
a "something' for everybody"
play, its positive virtues being
its harsh dramatic honesty plus
a sardonic psychological subt-
lety - an interesting coupling.
The script of No Place to be
Somebody is. a searching piece
of work. It puts a number of
characters, who come in a va-
riety of colors and color psy-
chologies, together in a seedy
Greenwich Village bar and plays
them off against each other.
And, since it gives the charact-
ers - a v i t a l collection of
pimps, racketeers, prostitutes,
and thugs - something to per-
form, there are a number of
verymentionable performances.
That of Nathan George, who
plays Johnny Williams, the wild
black owner of the bar, is chief
among these.
Though there are several
plots going all at o n c e, the
Program Info: NO 2-6264
HELD OVER!
5th W EEK ...
SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:00-5:00
7:00-9:10 P.M.
ACAD EAWARD
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
GIG YOUNG

mainline of the play consists in
Johnny's efforts to stay afloat
- to be his own man on his
own terms in a territory that is
hostile in all sorts of ways. His
bar is his castle and he runs it
with desperate will - temper,
wit, treachery, loyalty, and true
bravery combined - until he
goes under, a victim of the local
Maffia and of some spectacular
flaws in his own make-up.
Unfortunately the play, oth-
erwise rich and complex, moral-
izes around one of these flaws,
a "disease" which he has. inher-
ited from a now-dying old
mentor called Sweets. Sweets
terms the disease "the Charlie
fever:" "I gave you the Charlie
fever, Johnny, and I'm sorry
for it. The worst thing a man
can have is the Charlie fever.
We couldn't c o p y the white
man's good points and liveso
we copied his bad points and
hated him that much more."
Such a formulation is very
familiar, and while it may have
its truth, I find it a rather safe
way out of an unruly play. For
it does dictate moral terms for
the end of the p 1a y, where
Johnny dies at the hand of a
tamer, simpler, and more mod-
erate black. A n d he dies, it
seems, mainly for his intoler-
ance.
Gabe tabriel, the character
who stands as a foil to John-
ny is, significantly, a light-skin
black. Onstage w ith a type-
writer at the beginning of the
play, he tells us that this is a
Iother
odor
No feminine spray
can stop it.
The "other" odor. It starts in
the vaginal tract where no spray
can work. You can't spray it
away. And it's more offensive
than external odor caused by
perspiration.
That's the reason you need
Norforms*... the second deodor-
ant." These tiny suppositories
kill germs-stop odor in the va-
ginal tract for hours. Something
no spray can do. And doctor-
tested Norforms can be used as
often as necessary. They insert
easily, quickly..
Get Norforms' protection for
the "other" odor no spray can
stop.
The second deodorant.

play which he is making up as
he goes along. He wanders in
and out of Johnny's bar, step-
ping out of the drama before
each act to deliver a commen-
tary. Thus it is not surprising
that he should be the vehicle
for a simple moral. But even
though Johnny's death is dra-
matically inevitable, a much
deeper reality could be achieved
if he were simply to come to the
end of himself and of his own
violent tether.
Among the characters that
Johnny Williams struggles to
keep under thumb are two
whites who "have a thing" for
blacks. One is a call-girl who
is physically on the rocks. She
leans on Johnny, ostensibly for
some good black sex but really
for an all-rescuing love. The
other is a spindly bartender
called Shanty Mulligan who is
after soul, and is h a1f-crazy
See 'SOMEBODY,' Page 10

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MUSIC INCORPORATED

--jazz group from New York

Saturday, April 11
4:30 P.M.
Union Ballroom

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$2.00 at the door
(not $1.50 as previously advertised)

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DEDICATED TO THE BLACK ACTION MOVEMENT

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Last Two Performances ...
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS present
THE PLOUGH AND THE STARS
by SEAN O'CASEY
Wednesday-Saturday, Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, 8:00 P.M. Box Office oper
12:30-8:00 P.M. Phone 668-6300'
FL
April 9, 10-Thurs., Fri.
MIN AND BILL"
dir. GEORGE RAY HILL (1930)
The Fat Garbo of Tugboat Annie and the
Brando of Pancho Villa. Marie Dressler and
Wallace Berry spar like beautiful bears in
heat.;
7 & 9:05 Architecture
662-8871 75c Auditorium

PREVIEW

ANN ARBOR BLUES FESTIVAL'

NORM AN:
KENNEDY.
Scotland's finest
traditional singer

SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 1970

Otis Rush
Roosevelt Sykes'

Johnny Littlejohn
John Jackson

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7:30 P.M.-HILL AUDITORIUM
University Activities Center-Canterbury House Production

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Nobody swings
ike Kathy and Dale, Natalie andIryThelma and Mike, Liz and Mitch.

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ACADEMY AWARD
WINNER
BEST FOREIGN
FILM

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"7' damn near "The last word
knocks you out in thrillers.
of your seat." Terrific."
-Pauline Koel, The ---Gene Sholit, LOOK MAGAZINE
New Yorker

"Enough intrigue
and excitement to
eclipse James Bond."
-PLAYBOY

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"There are lots
of laughs and
the sex play is in
the open. A very
high class exam-
ple of the genre
TAKING OFF
WHERE LEERY
COPOUTS LIKE,
'BOB & CAROL &
TED.& ALICE'
ARE GROUND-
ED! In this one,
you get an orgy
that's an orgy."
-Judith Crist,
New York Magazine
"Fun and
games! The film
slips social signi-
ficance between
the sheets. A
wife-swapping
romp!"
-Willam Wolf,
cue Magazine

"It is not an amateurish
sexploitational quickie..
It's a hip sleeper! Clever
amusing dialogue that is
often incisive, raw and
significant. Even as you
laugh, which is often,
you're getting a sQber,
royal education on the
sexual revolution that is
said to be engulfing split-
level, saran-wrapped
suburbia. 'ALL THE LOV-
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'BOB & CAROL & TED &
ALICE' AT THE START-
ING GATE!"
-Bob Salmaggi, WINS

"A GENUINE
RARITY, a film
which is at once
topical (wife-
swapping), por-
nographic (you
really see some
of it), funny and
serious!"
-Archer Winsten,
New York Post
"The couples in
'BOB & CAROL
&- TED & ALICE'
attempt wife-
swapping but
they can't go
through with it.
In 'ALLTHELOV-
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THEY JUST DO
IT!"
-New York Daily News
"A movie about
wife-swapping -
nudity. . . sex ..
blunt dialogue..
vitality and rau-
cous humor!"

4

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