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April 10, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

k NOWTME
FOH VILLaGE 1:00-3:00-5:0
SHOWING 375NoMAPLE RD."769.300a7 7:20-9:30

page three

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&Iill

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

"'M A*S* His what
the new freedom
of the screen
is all about."
-Richard Schckel, Life
s : ..
An Ingo Preminger Production
Color by DELUXE0 i @
Panavisions L=R

Friday, April 10, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

Florida,
o fficials
arrested

JOIN THE SPORT Of THE SPACE AGE
PARACHUTING SERVICE
TECUMSEH; MICHIGAN

BRADENTON, Fla. 01P)-Deputy
U.S. marshals yesterday arrested
10 men-four aides to Gov. Claude
Kirk, a sheriff and five deputies
-in an attempt to halt Kirk's in-
terference with federal court-or-
dered integration of Manatee
County schools.
The marshals were unable to
takeany prisoners, however, when
the men refused to go jail.

Violence marks
trucking strike;
one pact signed
By The Associated Press
A major Chicago trucking association and -two unions
representing local drivers signed a wage agreement yesterday
offering 55 cents more an hour over a three-year period than
a national contract announced last week in Washington.
Meanwhile, violence broke out in other sections of the
nation as truckers .continued to strike against the tentative
contract approved last week by Teamster officials and truck-
ing industry representatives which calls for raises of $1.10
an hour.
Walkouts hit major industrial centers in the Midwest and
showed few signs of abating elsewhere.
In Washtenaw County, virtually all industrial deliveries

Michigan's Most Active
Sport Parachuting Center
Saturday, Sunday, Holidays
--For Information Call-
MON.-FRI.-291 -3634
WEEKENDS-423-7720
ENJOY SKYDIVING AT ITS BEST
Classes Start 11:00 Sat. & Sun.

Last Sunday, Kirk fired Mana-
tee County school superintendent
Jack Davidson and assumed con-
trol of the Manatee schools in de-
fiance of Federal desegregation
busing orders. A federal judge re-
instated Davidson on Tuesday but
he was fired again by Kirk on
Wednesday. ,
Kirk said in Tallahassee: "If
marshals have arrested my people,
I'm going to go down there and!
put them (the marshals) in ther
county jail."
The 10 men were under arrest
for obstructing justice by blocking
the marshals from executing a
federal court order.

-Daily-Randy Edmonds

f

Neighborhood laudromat

F

STUDENT BOOK SGRVIC

Genial Ann Arbor laundromats
provide service and pleasure,

KILLER SALE

CONTINUES

EVERYTHING ridiculously Reduced in Price

ALL USED BOOKS
AT 50% OFF
AND MORE
,ALL NEW BOOKS

AT 20% OFF
AND MORE
Open till 9 P.M.

Deputy Marshal John Barr of
Tampa said he considered the
men under arrest although they
were not in custody. "There will
be more arrests later," he said.
U.S. District Judge Benjamin
Krentzman issued an order Tues-
day for Kirk to stop interfering
with the operation of schools in
this Gulf Coast county. He has
ordered Kirk to appear inecourt
today to show why he should not
be held in contempt for blocking
desegregation.
The order for Kirk to get out of
the school case included a ban
on his education aide, William
Meloy.
"We intend to remove Meloy
from the building as required by
the temporary restraining order
issued in federal court Tuesday,"
said Asst. U.S. Atty. Oscar Blas-
singgame.
The marshals arrested - but
failed to physically capture-Me-
loy and Kirk aides Robert Hoff-
man, Lloyd Haganan and Dick
Warner; Manatee County Sheriff
Richard W. Weitzenfeld, and five
of his deputies.
Hagaman and Weitzenfeld took
refuge in the office of School Supt.
Jack Davidson whom Kirk sus-
pended on Sunday and again on
Wednesday.

By ROSE SUE BERSTEIN
Washing clothes can be more
than soap suds and hot water if
you take your laundry to one of
the two laundromats near campus.
"Quick Coin" on E. Williams,
and The Laundromat on South
Forest next to the defunct Whistle
Stop, offer 24-hour accessabil-
ity, the conventional washers and
dryers, a bench or two to sit on
and a chance to-"meet lots of dif-
ferent people with dirty clothes.
Whatever time of day or night,
there is always some industrious
person, finally run out of under-
wear, who is hovering over a wash-
er to clean tomorrow's clothes.
And many of these laundromat
users have developed a special
affection for one or the other
establishment. One. fan of the S.
Forest laundromat says he g o e s
there "because the water here is
hotter and my clothes get cleaner."
However, another patron com-
plains that the change machine
frequently doesn't work and t he
detergent dispenser offers o n 1y
"Bold with enzymes."
"Quick Coin" is generally con-
sidered to be the quieter laundro-
mat whose customers have b u t

es. Even essentials like eating don't
get in the way-as one woman
says she often brings her dinner in
while she folds the last nightshirt
and blouse.
Most "Quick Coin" customers
are generally pleased with t h e
laundromat although one fiftyish
lady says, "I wish they w o u 1 d
have baskets to put your clothes
in when you take them from the
washer to the dryer."
Her husband likes the place,
though, especially the new panel-
ing put in after a February fire
when one of the driers blew up.
Another patron, a one-time
maintenance man, says he and his

est help" and "the quick servic-
tng." At one laundromat, he claims,
"the customers throw rotten food
into the machines and the man-
agers never clean it up. But t h e
worst things that can happen here
are pens falling into machines and
leaking on clothes, and coins oc-
casionally jamming the w a s h-
ers."
"You can tell a lot about a place
from looking at the machines,"
the maintenance man adds. "I f
anything goes wrong here they fix'
it within a few days so the ma-
chines always look nice and work
well.

one purpose in mind-clean cloth- Iwife like the clean machines, "hon-

. tW! ALL WEEK

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FACES

directed by JOHN-CASSAVETES
A dramatic cinema Vertie style look at
middle class America.

Hi-Fi Buys
Feature Album
DELANEY & BONNIE
and FRIENDS
ON TOUR
with ERIC CLAPTON
$2.64 each

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
PRESIDENT NIXON will deliver his fourth nationwide broad-
cast message on Vietnam next Thursday.
The President is expected to announce new troop pullbacks and
possibly the new chief negotiator at the Paris peace talks.
The broadcast will be over television and radio at 9 p.m. EST
April 16, and the President will'talk for about 15 minutes.
FORMER SOLDIERS who participated in the alleged My
Lai massacre may face prosecution in federal courts.
Pentagon lawyers are considering asking congress to grant per-
mission for this action. Other possibilities for prosecution of soldiers
would involve untested sections of military laws.
Prosecution of soldiers who are still in th service is no problem,
but for five months government lawyers have been wrestling with
the problem of how to prosecute soldiers who have returned to civilian
life.
THE TRANSCRIPT AND JUDGE'S REPORT on the inquest
into the death of Mary Jo Kopechne are expected to be released
next week.1
The Massachusetts Supreme Court yesterday denied a motion by
a court stenographer who claimed he alone had the right to make and
sell copies of the inquest records.
The way is thus paved for release of the records by the Suffolk
Superior Court.

were halted due to wildcats
Teamster pickets at the major
trucking firms.
In spite of efforts by union offi-
cials to prevent the walkouts, op-
erations of the major county
trucking associations-- Associated
Truck Lines, Inc., Central Trans-
port, Inc., Interstate System, Inc.,
and Yellow Freight System, Inc.-
came to a standstill.
The pickets are members of
Teamsters Local 299.
The walkout is not expected to
affect food and milk deliveries
which are made by members of a
separate Teamsters local.
In Chicago, eight Teamster Un-
ion locals and the independent
Chicago Truck D r i v e r s Union
signed the contract with the Illi-
nois Motor Truck Operators Asso-
ciation. It provides for wage in-
creases of $1.65 an.hour over three
years, five cents short of the un-
ions' demand.
Some 8,000 drivers are affected
by the agreement.
In Washington, a spokesman for
Trucking Employers Inc., which
negotiated the $1.10 per hour na-
tional agreement with the Team-
sters, said of the higher contract
agreement in Chicago "the com-
mon carriers will never go for this
and they can stay out until snow
falls."
The industry spokesman said
trucking representatives met with
Teamsters acting president Frank
E. Fitzsimmons and that "both
major parties are standing by the
agreement."
A trucker was found shot to
death beside his rig in Youngs-
town, Ohio, but police said they
could not immediately determine
whether his death was linked to
the strikes.
The dead man was identified as
Albert Meadows, 37, of Washing-
ton Court House, Ohio. Police
said he apparently was shot while
unloading fruit.
Police in Painesville, Ohio, ar-
rested six employes of a Cleveland
trucking firm after a bullet struck
a rented truck driven by manage-
ment trainees of a rubber firm
transporting tires. In Huron Coun-
ty, four rear tires on a moving
truck were shot out, and police
investigated reportsk of tire punc-,
tures on rigs parked at a truck
stop.:
A night watchman was beaten
at a freight terminal in Gary,
Ind., where Teamsters continued,
to picket the city's three big steel
mills. But union and company of-
ficials said they were baffled be-
cause the terminal was not buck-
ing the picket line.

Crew for'
Apollo 13
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. (M)--The
exposure of Astronaut Thomas K.
Mattingly II to German measles
was confirmed yesterday, and the
launch of the Apollo 13 moon
voyage hung on the ability of
backup astronaut John L. Swigert.
Swigert, thrust into the prime
crew with just two days to catch
up, began a crash. training pro-
gram with James A. Lovell Jr.
and Fred W. Haise Jr. -
Medical experts at the National
Institutes of Health in Bethesda,
Md., tested the blood samples of
another backup astronaut, Charles
Duke, and reaffirmed an early
diagnosis that he has German
measles.
Duke, suffering from a rash,
fever, and arthritic-like inflam-
mation of his fingers and wrists,
exposed both the prime and back-
up crewmen last week. Lovell,
Haise and Swigert are immune to
the disease, but Mattingly is 'not.
Basedon these findings, doctors
recommended that Mattingly not
fly Saturday. The final decision
on Mattingly will be made by
NASA Administrator, Thomas O.
Paine.
The 38-year-old Swigert went
through critical rehearsals with
Lovell and Haise of lunar orbit
activities and abort situations for
the launch pad and near the moon:
All require perfect, split-second
teamwork.
The ultimate decision on wheth-
er to blast off as scheduled Satur-
day at 2:13 p.m. EST or postpone
until the next favorable date, May
9, hinges on flight commander
Lovell's judgment whether the
last-minute replacement would
affect the team's coordination.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daly Tues-
day thrcugh Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier. $3.00 by
mail.

AUD. A, ANGELL HALL

APRIL 10, 11, 12-Fri., 514,Sun.

7 & 9:30 P.M.

75c

14

j
i

When in Southera Ca/idorna isit Unred ra l dios .
. HAS THAT YOUTHFUL ACCENT WHICH PLACES
IT IN A LEAGUE WITH ZEFFIRELLI'S 'ROMEO-AND
JULIET.'"-John Mahoney, FM and Fine Arts Magazines
"AN INSTANT CLASSIC. IT HAS A HAMMER-LOCK ON
HISTORY, PERFORMANCE, PATHOS AND ROOTING
INTEREST!"-Archer Winsten, N.Y. Post
,"EPIC BATTLE OF THE SEXES.'-Vincent Canby, i.Y.Times
rS .S .
RICHARD BURTON
as HENRY VI
GENEVIEVE BUJOLD$
as ANNE BOLEYN
IN THE HALWALLIS PRODUCTION
osENEAPAD
IRENE PAPAS

618 S. Main

I

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II

it

Once again we invite
All Markley Residents
TO WELCOME THE SABBATH WITH'
RABBI GERALD GOLDMAN & FAMILY
FRIDAY APRIL 10 6:00 P.M
Meet in Lounge 3
Dinner in Dining Room 3
Bring Meal Card
For Reservations, call 663-4129 by Fri. the 1Oth, 1 p.m.
i, A}

The
77th Annual
Ann Arbor

rf a

I .

THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA IN ALL CONCERTS
THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. Preludes: "O Mensch, bewein' dein' Sunde" and
"Wachet auf" (Bach-Ormandy); and Mahler Symphony No. 2 in C minor ("Resur-
rection") with EVELYN MANDAC, Sporano, BIRGEIT FINNILA, Contralto; and
the UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION.
FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 8:30
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor. EVELYN MANDAC, Sporano, and THE UNIVER-
SITY CHORAL UNION in Stabat Mater (Poulenc) and "Prologue' (Alan Stout)-
both for Sporano, Chorus and Orchestra. ALICIA DE LARROCHA, Pianist, in Mozart
Concerto, No. 19, in F major, K. 459.
SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. Tone Poem, "Don Juan" (Strauss), VAN CLI-
BURN, Pianist, in Concerto No. 1 in B-flat minor, Op. 23 (Tchaikovsky); "To the
Victims of Hiroshima"-Threnody (Penderecki); and Suite No. 2 from "Daphnis and
Chloe" (Ravel).
SUNDAY, APRIL 26, 2:30
THOR JOHSON, Conductor. Bach "Magnificat" with BENITA VALENTE, Soprano;
MARY BURGESS, Contralto; JON HUMPHREY, Tenor; LESLIE GUINN, Baritone;
and THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION-SMALL CHORUS. Debussy's "La Da-
moiselle elue" with BENITA VALENTE, Soprano, and BIRGIT FINNILA, Contralto;
and WOMEN'S CHORUS OF THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION. ITZHAK
PERLMAN, Violinist, in Concerto No. 2 in G minor, Op. 63 (Prokofieff).

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