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April 09, 1970 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-09

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;e Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY
* . . :*____- poetry and prose
K <E~~ . . . . . . . . . ...................j.. z 45..k.... ,-;:[+. ....

Thursday, April 9, 1970

'Anon'.
By JIM PETERS
Squirt-guns and frisbees are a
sure sign of spring in-Ann Ar-
bor, and, so too, is the annual
publication of the graduate lit-
erary magazine, Anon. But this
year's Anon is more suited to
the glowering skies and uncer-
tainties of March: for, what-
ever the emotional response to
blue skies and budding trees, the
magazine offers a somewhat
more serious view, through its
art, of man and his place in the
cosmological continuun - a
nascent awareness of the total-
ity of life.
But, as in any complex con-
ception, there are flaws; t h e
volume suffers from an overly
academic viewpoint - as if
these notions had not yet found
appropriate and comfortable
forms and metaphor. Behind Joe
Valerio's molecular cover rem-
iniscent of the Brussel's World's
Fair when atomic technology
was found to be laudable per se,
the authors waiver betweenpast
and present, between sensuality
and comic didactics.
The prose of Anon appears
more sure of what it is doing,
while the poets struggle to step
forward carrying tradition like
some precious invalid who must
be kept alive. Max Apple's "The
Recreation of Harriet" would
have u see that Stephen's VFW
hall is indeed a civic auditorium,
.that Harriet's midwestern an-.
tics really were contests of skill-
ed athletes, that the two sides
of this domestic coin are identi-
cal.
The passage from "Just As
Madness" by Warren Hecht is
more specific; Kid Rome re-
places yin and /yang with t h e
three-pronged fork of being, but
does not act upon any of his
barroom revelations, it is t h e
waiter, Dog, who is aware and
coniments, "Unavoidable tonal-
itmvfthe edible;" Rome is play-
ing'.too many- animal games.
In "The Magic Rape Conspir-
acy," the further adventures of
Captain America and hi4 boys
Peter'Anderson introducesbthe
relativity of time into the spec-
trum of human perception. Past
characters exploit the possible
markets of today; but, more im-
portantly present-day personali-
ties merely continue the atro-
cities of an earlier century. Is
Chicago any different than the
town of Teabag?
Yet the humor and startling
The 'University of Michigan
Varsity Band, conducted by
Carlo Veronda, with John Moh-
ler as guest clarinetist, will play
a concert at 8 p.m. Saturday,
April 11, in Hill Auditorium.
The concert, which is open to
the public free of charge, will be
broadcast live over U-M radio
station WUOM, Ann Arbor, and
WVGR, Grand Rapids.
The Program will include works
by Filmore, Johnson, Berlioz-
Goldman, Latham, Whear, G.
Gabrieli-Schaefer, Rabaud, and
Hanson.

literal sign of spring

absurdity of these pieces g i v e
only transitory pleasure: Ander-
son's druggy allusions become
wearisome, Kid Rome is no more
than a spectre, and women
wrestlers are neither sad n o r
funny. The writers take off our
blinders but offer no insights
as to what more there is to see.
The process is still an end, and
not a means.
Anon's poetry is more varied
in its intentions and craftsman-
ship, though many of the poets
have found their escape to per*-
ception in the ubiquity' and
eternity of nature. Ken Fifer's
serene "Two Painters" m o v e s
within an objective conscious-
ness which gives his fleeting
final image. strong emotional
content; he uses what the prose
writers are onlydiscovering.
Others see caves, fountains,
and suburban springs only 'in
terms of their effects on indi-
viduals: the fine stylistics of
Thom Snapp and Robert Hay-
den carry us no further than the
personas of their poems, where-
as Jean Casale's "Unharvest"
speaks of the earth itself.
If the poet himself must
speak, then John Kolar's "Rit-
ual" provides a voice without
connotations to look at sacrifice
in almost conceptual terms,
achievig the same tone as Bar-
ry Wallenstein's "Pity t h e
Friends of Skeletons." And the
violence of "Cabled to the
Mount"by Ira'Shorecould just
as well be directed against poets;
they, too, may stand "syllabic
omens of the double code."
It is interesting to note J.
K. Snyder's "Owt of thise blake
wawes for to saylle;" here the
concept of the poem is more en-
compasing that its realization.
It is only the second stanza
which: goes, beyond the scene-
settin$ of the beginning. Also,
John Conron's "New Day" r e -
mains ambiguous because of its
uncertain and shifting point of
view.
"Things, Things" by Radcliffe
Squires is weighed down by the
sentimental reverie of its close;
this poem should be nore than
an A plus B connecton of the
two parts - it is a me'taphor

worthy of more. James Torrens'
"The Violent Bear Us Away."
too, seems no more than skeletal
preparation for his thesis. There
are omens and warnings here,
as in Robert Kusch's "Ellis
Island;" but Torrens has not
chosen well his images, nor does
he achieve any building of in-
tensity.
The eleven fragments of Sap-
pho's work translated by Kon-
stantinos Lardas stem from too
masculine a conception of the
Lesbian: her voice is not so
loud; her images require subtler
awakening,. But n u m b e r six
echoes well the simple power of
her life view.
The series of engravings by
Stanley Wyatt mirrors the ques-
tions which fill this year's

Anon. Though d o n e recently,
they possess the bluntness of
18th c e n t u r y work, another
modern creation using the past
for statement. Is he heralding a
return to the intellectual wiz-
ardry of The Age of Reason, or
is it mere hommage to the past?
The leanings and varying atti-
tudes of this issue provide no
answer.
With few exceptions, the qual-
ity of this volume is high since
it raises questions in the mind
of the reader. Though some o
its writers prefer to remain sole
ly within craft, many use their
technique to investigate the lim-
its and capabilities of the art.
There are many questions and
few answers here. But it is
spring, so we have a beginning.

Summer Session at
Stanford University
JUNE 22 - AUGUST 15, 1970
FOR FULL DETAILS, WRITE:
OFFICE OF THE SUMMER SESSION
STANFORD UNIVERSITY
STANFORD. CALIFORNIA 94305
April 9, 10-Thurs., Fri.
MIN AND BILL"
dir. GEORGE RAY HILL (1930)
The Fat Garbo of Tugboat Annie and the
Brando of Pancho Villa. Marie Dressler and
Wallace Berry spar like beautiful bears in
heat.
1& 9:05 Architecture
662881 75c Auditorium

NOW FOX VILL6E
SHOWING 375 No. MAPLE RD.-76913OO

TIMES
1:00-3:00-5:10
7:20-9:30

' A M S'H'iswhat
the new freedom
of the screen
is all about."
-Richard Schickel, Life
An Ingo Preminger Production
Color by.DE LUXE5 jR
Panavision

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press .'

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11

'King Lear' by Stanley Wyatt

A

........music-
Sneaking a preview
of the Blues Festival

SUB-LET
SERVICE,
WE RENT YOUR. PLACE, FOR YOU ...

I.

By ACRT STRATTON
The blues return to Ann Ar-
bor this Sunday when UAC and.
Canterbury House present the
annual Blues Festival Preview
concert.
The show, featuring Otis
Rush, John Littlejohn, Jbhn
Jackson, and Roosevelt Sykes,
is scheduled for Sunday, April
12, 7:3 p.m., at Hill Aud.s
Ann" Arbor Blues Festival
goers remember Otis Rush and
Roosevelt Sykes from last sum-
mer. Sykes is the New Orleans
boogie-woogie pianist who open-
ed up on the festival's first,
night.. Over the-years, he has
cut an infinite number of songs,
including "Driving Wheel," a
song; popularized by Paul But-
terfield. He just recently gave a
perforiance at the Beloit Blues
Festival, where he played his
classic,"Dirty Mother For You,"
in the -college chapel!
Otis Rush is. the dynamic
guitarist those . hard-driving
Chicago blues made him one of
the. big "hits" .of last year's
festival: With a style similar to {
King's, . his music treads
..the :thin line between. blues and
jazz. His theme song, "I can't,
Quit You Baby," was a recent
succiess for' led :Zeppelin.
Jahn Jackson and John Little-
GRASS
HANDBOOK
THE MARIJUANA MANUAL
Send$1 .00 to Dart Enterprises,,
P.0. Box 40, Vi lage. Station,
New York, NY. 10014 I I
Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily

john are newconiers to the Ann
Arbor blues scene though hard-
ly newcomers to the world's-
blues scene. John Jackson's hill-
billy country blues guitar play-
ing was the talk of Europe this-
winter, when he toured with the
American-hFolk Blues Festival.
He- has two records out on Ar-
hoolie.
John Littlejohn is one of Chi-
cago's best slide guitarists, play-
ing in the whining bottleneck
style developed by the late El-
more James. Originally from
Mississippi, he very easily com-
bines the urbane Blues sound
with down-home flavor. He has
a record out on Arhoolie and he
too has toured Europe.
The Blues Festival committee
plans to have an intermission
in the concert in which they will
present some of the details
about this August's festival.
Tickets for the Preview con-
cert are $1.25, and ,are on sale
all this week at the Union and
on ,the Diag (if it's sunny).

CLOGS

l

from

4;

STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL

INNER
SPACE

COME ON I N AND REGISTER
HUNDREDS HAVE ALREADY!!!

DENMARK and SWEDEN
ONLY $10.00
Choose from a Variety of Colors
MAS SHOES
~619 E. LIBERTY'

DESIGN
LIGHT FABRICATION
INTERIORS
LIGHTING
LOW.COST
769-6871

Student Living Quarter
.1217 S. Unerity-6626591

./

i

.....
r

"m

-

CHANGE THE ED SCHOOL
APPLY NOW!

GAY LIBERATION
Everyone sincerely interested in the further
development of the Ann Arbor Gay Libera-
tion Front (an official student organiza-
tion) is invited to attend the next meeting.
Women too!
Thursda, April 9 8:30 P.M .
For info call 665-7502

Openings for
students on
Committees:

grad, andergrad, and LS&A
Ed School Administrative,

GOING TO EUROPE
THIS SUMMER?
Pick up anew Simca 1204. Use itwhile you're there and bring it
home for less than you'd pay for one here. Or lease it and leave
it there.
LOWEST RATES ANYWHERE
European A tor63-Service
331 S. Fourth Ave., Ann Arbor 663-0110

I

UNDERGRADUATE COMMITTEE
GRADUATE COMMITTEE
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
RESEARCH COMMITTEE
APPLICATIONS & INFO AVAILABLE IN RM. 2011
ED SCHOOL. Deadline for applications has been ex-
tended to April 13 due to the fact that the Ed School
chose to shut down and support BAM during the
strike.

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1.

$

I

S

rJ

-~ . = m u m

Once again we invite
All Markley Residents
TO WELCOME THE SABBATH WITH

I t

IAL 5-6290
H ELD ,OVER
4th WESEK
" FOUR STARS #** 01G0T
RATING..: A GRATIFYING
ACHIEVEMENT."
-Wanda Hale, NY. Daily News
"EPIC BATTLE OF THE SEXES.'
-Vincent Canby, N.Y.Times

Program Info; NO 2-6264
HELD OVER!
5th WEEK.
SHOWS AT: ,
1:00-3:00-5:00
7 :00-9:10P.M.
WINNER OF 3
ACADEMY AWARDS
includinq
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
GIG YOUNG

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TRANSCENDENTAL

RABBI GERALD GOLDMAN

MEDITATION
As Taught By
MAHARISHI
MAHESH
YOGI

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& FAMILY
6:00 P.M.

FRIDAY

APRIL 10,

Meet in Lounge 3
Dinner in Dining Room

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3

RiCHAn
BURTON
GENEVIEVE

Bring Meal Card
For Reservations, calF 663-4129 by Fri. the 10th, 1 p.m.

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