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April 09, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

U.of M. German Department
PRESENTS
"Deidermann und die Brandstifter"
by MAX FRISCH
Friday and Saturday, April 10 & 11
at 8:00 P.M. in Schorling Aud. of
University High School
(Proceeds will be donated to the
Martin Luther King Scholarship Fund)

Student
By RON RULOFF
Daily News Analysis
As the housing market in Ann Ar-
bor becomes tighter and more expen-
sive, it is increasingly difficult to find
an apartment to fit either one's de-
sires or pocketbook. T h is reality is
grim, especially for those still looking
for an apartment for next year.
Since January a new business call-
ed Student Living Quarters (SLQ) has
moved onto the apartment scene. The
basic purpose of SLQ, manager Randy
Eaton says, is to match the desires of
prospective tenants with what is avail-
able on the market.
SLQ has compiled listings of avail-
able apartments from realtors a n d
private owners, each listing contain-
ing pertinent information a b o u t
apartments such as rent and the num-
ber of bedrooms, Eaton explains.

Living Quarters: House

The same information regarding the
type of apartment desired is listed by
the prospective tenant, and he is giv-
en a list of apartments that m o s t
closely match his criteria.
"We've researched the established
landlords and private owners and
compiled listings of about 1,500 apart-
ments in and around Ann Arbor," Eat-
on says, adding that 40 -per cent of
the apartments are private and not
listed by realtors.
SLQ continues to give listings of
apartments to students until they are
satisfied with one of them. The list-
ings cover basic facts about apart-
ments but the students must find out
the actual condition of the apartment
for themselves.
An informal survey showed that this
has lead to disappointment among a

I

few users of SLQ's services. Most of
those who complained about the ser-
vice, however, admitted that their ex-
pectations of apartment quality and
price had been unrealistic.
"We didn't like anything they sent
us to, so we tried on our own for a
month, then went back to them and
got an apartment from one of their
listings," one apartment hunter com-
ments.
"We had no idea a good apartment
would cost so much," he says.
The large majority of SLQ custo-
mers contacted appeared satisfied with
the service. A majority of those inter-
viewed indicated they were happy to
be given listings of apartments and
not have to compile these on their
own.
"I'll definitely go to them again next

year," says one f r e s h m a n girl.
Eaton claims 60 per cent of those
looking for apartments through his
service are satisfied within two weeks.
"People have been reluctant to use
our service because of a $25 service
charge. We're cutting that in half
now," Eaton says.
He explains the previous arrange-
ment had been to refund half of the
$25 fee if the cutomer found an apart-
ment through his own sources. By
charging a straight fee of $12.50, Eat-
on hopes the volume of business will
go up with less paperwork.
SLQ remains, for the time being,
aloof from tenant-landlord disputes.
According to SLQ, it is a referral ser-
vice only, and does not engage in ac-
tual leasing. Eaton says, however, he
is interested in the Tenants Union ac-

hunters
tivities and would be "interested in
talking to them."
SLQ's business outside Ann Arbor-
proper has put it in contact with own-
ers interested in leasing farms and
other property not traditionally rent-
ed to students.
So far, according to Eaton. SLQ has
served as the go-between for about
four music groups who were looking
for a place where they could prac-
tice without causing a disturbance.
"People are reluctant to rent to
groups," explains Eaton, "mostly be-
cause of their appearance. This dis-
appears when they see hard cash and
are assured there will be no trouble
meeting payments."
Eaton adds that he has had several
inquiries concerning renting farm-
land for communes.

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III..

FACES

directed by JOHN CASSAVETES
A dramatic cinema Vertie style look at
'middle class America..
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
APRIL 10, 11 12-' Fri."Sa"l. Sun.
7 & 9:30 P.M. 75c

i

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F --
ISTUDC-NT BOOK SQRVICQ
KILLER SALE
CONTINUES -
EVERYTHING ridiculously Reduced in Price
ALL USED BOOKS
AT 50% OFF
AND MORE
ALL NEW BOOKS
AT 20% OFF
AND MORE
ALL WEEK Open till 9 P.M.

I

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
FLORIDA GOVERNOR Claude Kirk yesterday resumed con-
trol of the Manatee County school system, refusing to integrate
classes as ordered by U.S. District Judge Ben Krentzman.
Defying a federal judge for the second time in three days,
Kirk suspended once again the county's top school officials.
Kirk suspended County Supt. Dr. Jack. Davidson for the first
time Sunday, a day before classes were to be desegregated under a
ilan approved by Judge Krentzman.
The judge directed Davidson to reclaim his job and to implement
the desegregation order by today.
The order called for an additional 2,600 of the system's 17,000
pupils to be bused to new schools.
An aide to the governor reiterated Kirk's opposition to forced
busing.
Kirk appointed his education assistant, William Meloy, to ad-
minister the county's school system for him.
MEASLES-THREATENED ASTRONAUT Thomas K. Mat-
tingly II may be replaced on the flight crew for the Apollo 13 moon
voyage.
The space agency said yesterday that civilian astronaut John
L. Swigert Jr. of the backup team is immune to German measles and
"is qualified in all aspects of the mission" to take Mattingly's place.
The decision on whether to postpone the launch to May 9, the.
next favorable date, or to remove Mattingly from the crew was de-
layed, pending more medical tests.
The three Apollo 13 crewman were exposed to German measles
last week.
The other crewman, James A. Lovell Jr. and Fred W. Haise Jr.,
were reported to be immune to the disease.
Meanwhile, a strike which would have affected two Australian
tracking stations that plot moon missions was averted yesterday
when jobs were promised for technicians due to be dismissed. The
strike would have forced a postponement of the Saturday launch.
EGYPT CLAIMED yesterday that Israeli planes bombed a
school in the eastern Nile Delta killing 30 children and wound-
ing 36.
Israeli-Defense Minister Moshe Dayan said Israeli warplanes hit
only military targets. He said Cairo's claim meant that "perhaps the
Egyptians did keep some children within the military installation."
"If they did so," Dayan added, "then of course they took upon
themselves a very heavy responsibility."
"We are ready to show the pictures and to explain how we know
this is a military installation," Dayan said.
- - - -
SOUTH VIETNAMESE; paratroopers, helicopter gunships and
fighter bombers attacked North Vietnamese in Cambodia yes-
terday and Tuesday.
Sources in Saigon reported yesterday that the Cambodian gov-
ernment has approved the actions.
The helicopter pilots claimed they killed 150 North Vietnamese
soldiers when they flew five miles into Cambodia Tuesday.
South Vietnamese paratroopers marched out of Cambodia yes-
terday to join U.S. troops in South Vietnam. Backed by planes, the
South Vietnamese had struck an area north of Highway 1, the main
thoroughfare between Saigon and Phnom Penh, the Cambodian
capital.
THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION yesterday was
accused of helping the food industry set the nation's dinner tables
with chemical feasts.
Investigators directed by Ralph Nader said the FDA fails to block
harmful additives and pesticide residues from getting into foods, per-
mits processors to avoid listing possibly harmful ingredients, and
doesn't devote enough time to policing sanitation.
The Agency replied by describing its recent reorganization as one
change which has made it more responsive to consumer interests.
THE MASSACHUSETTS SUPREME COURT yesterday or-
dered the inquest papers in the death of Mary Jo Kopechne to
be impounded.
At the request of the stenographic firm which recorded testimony
at the closed inquest in January, the full court directed that the
transcript not be released until the court so orders.
The firm claims a financial interest in the transcript.
The case involves the drowning death last July of Miss Kopechne,
whose body was found in Sen. Edward Kennedy's car after it went
off a bridge into a pond on Chappaquiddick Island.

Congress acts
to avert strike

P

ir ri n

tti1y

page three
Thursday, April 9, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

in rail

dispute

WASHINGTON (M -- Congress passed and sent to the
White House yesterday a bill designed to avert a nationwide
railroad strike.
The Senate passed the bill first, 88 to 3, and then the
House passed it by voice vote and sent it on to President Nix-
on.
The nationwide walkout had been threatened for Satur-
day, when a 37-day strike freeze earlier voted by Congress ex-
pires. Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.) told the House that
wildcat walkouts still might occur, despite the settlement
imposed by Congress.

6th
WEEK

dwm

DIAL
8-6416

-Associated Press
Meeting of the mayors
New York City Mayor John V. Lindsay talks m 4h Detroit Mayor
Roman S. Gribbs after touring the heart of the 1967 Detroit riot
area. Mayors of eight large cities met in Detroit yesterday in an
effort to pressure 4he Nixon administration into committing more
funds to solve urban problems.
CONTINUING SERIES:
Students rap about
drug use and abuse

ACADEMY AWARD
WINNER
BEST FOREIGN FILM,

"THE LAST WORD IN THRILLERS,
TERRIFIC!"
-GENE SHALIT, Look Mogozine

By ROBERT JERRO
In the first of a series of dis-
cussions aboutndrugs in the Un-
ion Tuesday night, a group of
"Woodstock citizens" tried to
clear up some of "straight" so-
ciety's a 11 e g e d misconceptions
about drug use and abuse.
Steven Schwartz, a graduate
student in psychology, elaborated
on the topic of drugs and society
Tuesday night. Tonight, Dr. Jul-
ian Villarreal will start a discus-
sion of drug dependence and.
treatment at 7:30 p.m. in the Un-
ion.
Schwartz called the present
prohibition against d r u g s in
America a "'panic" on the part of
middle class America which, he
said, associates drug use with a
strange- and menacing culture
characterized by a "f r e e life
style."
"The laws against drug use are
hypocritical," Schwartz said, "be-
cause practically every medicine
cabinet in America is filled with
pills to help you get up, help you
stay up, and then help you get to
bed at night and stay there."
The 50 people listening to Sch-
wartz broke up into smaller dis-

cussion groups where some indi-
viduals talked freely a b o u t ex-
perience with drugs or with peo-
ple who have taken drugs.
One person, who said he "had
dropped acid many times and will
continue to do so," maintained
that an LSD trip "is an intensely
personal experience," andthat he
"wouldn't recommend it to any-
one who wasn't strong enough to
face the paranoia that stares you
right in the face w hen you're
tripping."
Everyone agreed that taking
drugs might not be necessary at
all if the pressure and responsi-
bilities of everyday life were not
so great.
Detective Lt. Eugene Stauden-
meier of the Ann Arbor police
said, "I can cope with the pres-
sures of life without drugs, with-
out alcohol, without artificial
help."
Staudenmeier mentioned t h a t
something like the beauty of the
Grand Canyon could be enough
to get him high.
However, .one girl added "That
experience is 200 times as good
with drugs."

Nixon asked Congress for the
legislation, which puts into. effect
by law a settlement worked out by
the railroads and negotiators for
four shoperaft unions 1 as t De-
cember.
The settlement did not go into
effect, however, because one of
the unions involved - the sheet
metal workers -- rejected it. The
boilermakers, machinists, a n d
electricians approved the settle-
ment.
T h e December agreement in-
cludes retroactive and prospective
pay increases of 68 cents an hour
for the 47,000 rail employes rep-
resented by the four unions. Sec-
retary of Labor George P. Shultz
has estimated each man will get
about $500 in back pay.
Sen. Jacob K. .Javits (R-NY),
floor manager for the bill, said
he knew the bill was unpalatable
to the sheet metal workers. But
he said it was impossible for Con-
gress to devise any b ill which
would satisfy all the parties.
Meanwhile, a flurry of back-to-
work movements yesterday check-
ed the growth of a nationwide
truck drivers' strike as Teamsters
union officials met in Washington
to discuss the widespread walk-
out.
Striking truckers returned to
work in several cities, but the ef-
fect of their actions was partly
counterbalanced by a wildcat
walkout that hit a major Chicago
grocery chain.
Nearly 15,000 employes of De-
troit's Big Three automakers
either were laid off or were work-
ing curtailed shifts because of
trucking tieups. The scarcity of
goods to deliver forced layoffs of*
nonstriking drivers in Salt Lake
City, Las Vegas, Kansas City and
Cincinnati.
Concerning the slowdown by air
traffic controllers, the Federal
Aviation Administration claimed
traffic was almost back to nor-
mal.
However, major airlines report-
ed schedule cuts of about 40 per
cent in the New York area and 12
per cent across the country. Some
centers, such as New York, still
had more than half the controllers
reporting "sick" despite a federal
court order saying this amounted
to an illegal strike.

Hja tcked~
freigher':
released
SIHANOUKVILLE(MP9-T h e
hijacked U.S. freighter Columbia
Eagle sailed out of Cambodian
waters yesterday after 23 days of
detention by the Cambodian gov-
ernment.
The freighter, loaded with 1,751
tons of bombs, was hijacked by
two crewmen March 14 while en
routcE to Thailand.
A U.S. official said the Colum-
bia Eagle would not go to Thai-
land or South Vietnam. He said
the U.S. government had agreed
that this might violate Cambodia's
neutrality.
The ship is heading for a U.S.
Navy base in the Philippines. It
is scheduled to arrive at the base
Sunday, the State Department
said in Washington.
The two hijackers, Clyde Mc-
Kay and Alvin Glatowski, have
been granted political asylum. by
Cambodia.
Columbia Eagle Capt. Donald
0. Swann said the two hijackers
could be charged with both mu-
tiny and hijacking.
"Under the old law they could
be hanged for this," he said.:"I
don't like to see capital punish-
ment, but we can't just overlook
it."
U.S. officials stated, however,
that there are no plans to try
to extradite McKay or Glatow-
ski.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published. daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail

-:30-10

.-30 P.M. Q f
x:0PA Rap "about
DOPE
APRIL
arreal, Drug Dependence Thurs. 9
Fri. 10 Helen Epp
hards, Legal Aspects Sat. 11
se
Sun. 12 William (
V - MA r

Michigan Union
dining rooms 1,2, & 3
(basement floor)

-

Julian Vill
James Ric
of #Drug U

SEX
s, Abortion
ampbell
- a a - e

PREVIEW
Ann Arbor Blues Festival
SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 1970

OTIS RUSH R
Johnny Litlejohn

ZOOSEVELT SYKES
John Jackson

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