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April 08, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesdav. Argil 8. 19701

PageTwoTHE ICHGAN AIL
cinema
A glittering Acalcem-y.. .for whcat? :

TWiednV{ec _ nV yAn!ri 11 1970Ft
Y' ""

J

HOLLYWOOD VP) --Favored
John Wayne, the creaky bounty
hunter of True Grit, and long-
shot Maggie Smith, the spinster
school teacher of The Prime
of Miss Jean Brodie, won t o p
acting Oscars last night at the
42nd Academy Awards.
Midnight Cowboy, a seamy
tale of a male hustlsr in M a n-
hattan, was named, best picture
of 1969. Its director, John Schle-
singer, was also a winner along
with writer Waldo Salt, once
blacklisted by the film industry.
Wayne, 62, was accorded a
thundering ovation from t h e
movie crowd at the glittering
Music Center in recognition of
40 years of stalwart screen por-
trayals. He long has been re-
garded as the movies' top action
hero and is the acknowledged
all-time box office champion.
"Wow," said the damp-eyed
Wayne after lumbering on stage.
He had played a one-eyed mar-
shall in True Grit, and he

cracked "If I'd a known that,
I'd a put on that patch 35 years
earlier." He added his thanks
to the academy members and
movie fans everywhere, then
admitted he was "very grate-
ful, very humble.' He had been
the sentimental favorite. -
For Miss Smith it was a sur-
prise victory for a career of
playing drabs on the screen.
Jane Fonda and Liza Minelli
w e r e considered favorites for
best actress, but the British
star's performance in the little-
heralded Miss Brodie obviously
caught the voters' fancy. She
was not present for the award.
Gig Yo u n g, the marathon
dance operator of They S h o o t
Horses Don't They? ; and Goldie
Hawn, the giddy fiancee of
Cactus Flower, won best sup-
porting actors awards.
Young got his first O s c a r
after a long career as the lead-
ing man's friend in a host of
comedies. Goldie, the giggling
blonde of television's Laugh In,

drew the honor for her first
film.
The award for best foreign
film went to Z, a vituperative
attack on the military dictator-
ship of today's Greece. The film
was made by Frenchmen under
Algerian auspices.
The Oscar event got off to a
glittering but slow start at the
Los Angeles Music Center after
a prelude marked by noisy
picketing. B 1 a c k s marched on
the east side of the Music Cen-
ter, complaining of lack of par-
ticipation in the film industry,
and Mexican-Americans parad-
ed on the west side with the
same grievance. The picketing
was loud but orderly.
Oscar's old pal, Bob, Hope,
started the two-hour televised
program with his usual pepper-
ing of the film industry. Among
his comments:
"It's been a great year for
movies. Did you ever think you'd
see Richard Burton play both
king and queen? .. . This will go

down in history as the cinema
season which proved that crime
doesn't pay but there's a fortune
in adultery, incest and homo-
sexuality."
The comic added: "Are you
gonna tell me we're honoring a
sadistic king, a consumptive
drifter, a male hustler, a school
teacher dropout and a one-eyed
sheriff? This is not an academy
awards, it's a freak-out .,.
Hope presented the Jean Hers-
holt Humanitarian Award to
fellow. comedian George Jessel
for his long devotion to good
causes, including entertaining
American servicemen.
Burt Bacharach's lilting score
for Butch Cassidy and the Sun-
dance Kid won for the best orig-
inal score of a non-musical film.
The Oscar for best score of a
musical went to Lennie Hayton
and Lionel Newman for their
adaptation of Hello Dolly.
The fashions were stunning.
Highlight: Elizabeth Taylor in
a flowing gown of multicolored
metal fabric, with her $1.05 mil-
lion diamond shimmering above
her plurnging neckline.
Most actresses opted for long
dresses rather than the new midi
skirts.
Other ,awan'ds:
Best achievement in sound -
Hello Dolly, Chenault Produc-

tions. 20th Century Fox, Jack
Solomon and Murray Spivack.
Live action short subjects -
"The Magic Machines," Fly-By-
Night Productions, Joan Keller
Stern, producer.
Cartoon short subjects - "It's
Tough to be a Bird," Walt Dis-
ney Productions, Ward Kimball,
producer.
Cinematography - Butch Cas-
sidy and the Sundance Kid, a
George Roy Hill-Paul Monash
Production, 20th Century Fox,
Conrad Hall.
Film Editing - Z, Reggane
Films - O.N.C.I.C. Production,
Cinema V, Francise Bonnot.
Special Visual effects - Ma-
rooned, a Frankovich-Sturges
Production Columbia, Robbie,
Robertson.
Documentary production-fea-
tures, Arthur Rubinstein, The
Love of Life, a Midem Produc-
tion, Bernard Chevry, producer;
short subjects, "Chechoslovakia,
1968," Sanders - Fresco F i1 m
Makers for U.S. Information
Agency, Denis Sanders and Rob- .
ert M. Fresco, producers.
Art direction - Hello Dolly,
John DeCuir, J a c k Martin
Smith and Herman Blumenthal,

John Wayne wins best

-Associated Press
actor for 'True Grit'

f.

records
Let Frank do his Zappa' thing

set direction, sharing the same
award, Walter M. Scott, George
Hopkins and Raphael Bretton.
Costume Design-Anne of the
Thousand Days, a Hall B. Wal-
lis-Universal Pictures Ltd. pro-
duction, Universal, M a r g a t e t
Furse.

(., _

I

F

...............

By JOHN STAFFORD
When in high school you
found yourself perplexed at
hearing "Freak Out" by the
Mothers, you probably had the
same reaction that Susie Cream-
cheese did. "These Mothers is
crazy." Then you heard their
next two records and got into.
it. After all, you might have seen
them live when Frank Zappa
came to the mike after nearly
an hour of tuning and said,
"Aggravating, isn't it?" Then
there was Reuben and the Jets.
What gas. Man, is that funny.
Finally, though, 'you probably
got bored. with the Mothers.
You knew all the jokes, andt
their satire got to be a little
stale, a little grating. You saw
"Uncle Meat" and "Burnt Wee-
nie Sandwich" at the record
store and decided you should do
without.' Well, Frank has gotten
rid of the Mothers and he's de-
cided to stop being an angry
young cynic. Instead he has be-
come the most underrated
musician in the country. Sure,
you've heard that before, but
this is really the first record on
which it becomes evidently true.
The man is really a genius.
The- style is ;still somewhat
the same. Very eclectic. A Moog
sythesizer underplaying the ma-
jor themes. Japanese koto
music. Millions of time signa-
ture changes. Great drumming.
The best innovation, however is
the fact that it's all music. There
is one ,satirical piece in Hot
Ratz entitled "Willie the Pimp"

with Captain Beefheart singing
in a gravely, nasty, pimpy voice,
but the lyrics occupy only one
or two minutes. The three long
pieces, "Willie," "Son of Mr.
Green Genes" and "The Gumbo
Variations" are extensive free-
form jazz jams including Zappa
on guitar and bass. Ian Under-
wood is the best saxophone play-
er in the rock field that I can
think of offhand. It is so very
refreshing to hear a young sax
player who doesn't try to sound
like Coltrane and who is also an
excellent musician.
Frank still has a great love
for wah-wah distortion on his
guitar, but he uses it with more
effectiveness than anyone I can

think of 'with the possible ex-
ception of Eric Clapton. There
are a few sections in the long
jams when the variations are so
delicate and intricate that un-
less one is a musician or a music
scholar many of them are lost.
I found myself getting bored,
but knowing that I shouldn't
have been. These same varia-
tions have the added effect,
however, of leaving things to be
learned and heard for the first
time at each listening. This is
definitely an album to have fun
with for a long time. Buy it. If
you don't, you may never hear
it because most people don't dig
Zappa anymore. But that's their
loss, not yours.

TYPING
PRINTING
Avoid the Hassle
Check our Rates and
Professional Service
CAMPUS
MULTISERVICE
214 Nickels Arcade
662-4222

hy rt all those
clothes home?
" Call Greene's Cleaners today!
We'll deliver a storage box-
Fill it with your winter garments-
We'll pick it up-clean your garments-
Mothproof them and
Store them in our air conditioned vault.
Next fall-give us a call. We'll deliver-
fresh and clean--beautifully pressed.
" It's so convenient-and cheaper
than shipping. Still only $4.95 plus
regular cleaning charges. Call and
reserve your box today. 662-3231a
Greene's Cleaners
ANN ARBOR'S ONLY REFRIGERATED VAULT
. .rc . ..- ...... ..- .---.-.... ... ...........

BACH CLUB
presents
DR. CHARLES FISHER
playing works of Bach on,
and talking a bo u t, the
clavichord.
Refreshments and
FUN afterwards
Wed.,. Apr. 8-8P.M.
1236 WASHTENAW
tat Forest near S. Univ
EVERYONE WELCOME!
663-2827 761-7356
DIAL 5-629O
NOMINATED FOR 10
ACADEMY AWARDS
TODAY is LADIES' DAY
Ladies 75c until 6 P.M.
"FOUR STARS ** * HIGHEST
RATING... A GRATIFYING
ACHIEVEMENT."
-Wanda Hale, N.Y. Daily News
"EPIC BATTLE OF THE SEXES:"
-Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times

!1

i

I

U

I

NOW
SHOWING
tthe new fi
of the scri
is all abou
--Richard Schic
An Ingo Preming
Color by DE LU)
Panavision

F H V LU GE TIMES
FOX VLLUUE1:00-3:00-5:10
375 No. MAPLE RD.-7691300 7:20-9:30
H' is whatF
reedom
teen
kel, afe
er Production
E' A

I

Why be
fenced in?"
A truly spiritual view of
life'can open up unlimited
possibilities for you.
Come hear how a better
understanding of God can
bring you guidance, purpose,
and ability. Charles M. Carr,
C.S.B., a member of The
Christian Science Board of
Lectureship, is giving a lecture
for the whole community.
Everyone is invited. Bring
your friends. The purpose of
the lecture is to show that no
boundary can separate us from
the goodness of God.

I

i

i

I

==MON"

5tEK
WEEK

4-m

DIAL
8-6416

TODAY IS LADIES DAY
SHOWS AT 1:15-3:45-6:15-8:45
BestPicture

LW 2 -
-- - -- - -
elk

DARING
to be different
THE
POISON
APPLE

Wednesday, April 8
AMERICAN FILM STUDIES PROGRAM
dir. IRED WISEMAN (1969)
A documentary expose of what our public
schools call "education." Sold out all per-
formances in Ann Arbor last fall.
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75C AUDITORIUM

Ch'istiRScience ioci'e
12:10 noon Friday, April 10th
YM-YWCA, corner Fifth Avenue
and William St.'
Sponsored by First church of
christ, Scientist, Ann Arbor

I

RICHARD
BURTON
GENEVIEVE
WALLISPRODUCTION
w UNIVERSAL, vPSa tURS .1Hcotm' v~so GP
Shows at
:10-3:40-6 :15-9:00

"THE LAST WORD IN THRILLERS,
TERRIFIC !"

I

-GENE SHALIT, Look Magazine

i

_..

0

0

i

I

Does it hurt
to chill beer twice?

Norman
Kennedy,
is Scotland's
finest tradijional
singer. He ha's
been living in this
country for about
3 years, and has
appeared in the
Newport, Philadel-
phia, and Fox Hol-
low Folk Festivals
(among others).

4

I

-

I'l

I

NTS FILMS i
A Division of
National Talent Service, Inc.
Proudly Presents
THE MAYSLES BROTHERS'NEW FILM
SALE SAAN
The Most HighlyAcclaimed
Film Of The Year!
"Hard-hitting, anti-establishment
stuff."-Judith Crist / "I was spell-
bound. I've seen SALESMAN three
times and eaoh time^i've been more
impressed. Fascinating, very funny,
unforgettable."-Vincent Canby,
New York Times / "Probably the
most important film you will see this
year."-Joseph Gelmis, Newsday/
"Impossible to over-estimate. There
is no doubt that we shall see SALES-
MAN as a turning point in the history
of film."-Film Society Review /
"An extraordinary film no one dares
miss."-New York Magazine / "An
experience that sticks in the mem-
orv. The sspns beoms n-

Not that you'd want to. Some,
times it just happens... like
after a picnic, or when you
bring home a couple of cold
6-paks and forget to put 'em
in the refrigerator. Does re-
chilling goof up the taste or

just because the temperature
has its ups and downs.
You can understand why
when you consider all the extra
trouble and extra expense that
go into brewing Bud@. For in-
stance, Budweiser is the only
beer in America that's Beech-

3.

I

flatten the flavor
Relax. 'You don
to Worry.
A really
good beer like
Budweiser is just
as good when you

1't have wood Ag
t
't
Y~~e " ,
huiwellse t
a chill it

4MORANOW

Sat., 1 P.M.-
Workshop
with Norman
Kennedy
NEXT WEEK-
HARRY TUFT

ntcSrt

ed.
's absolutely okay
o chill beer twice.
Enough said. (Of
course, we have
a lot more to say
udweiser. But we'll

twice. We're mighty glad about

about B

bI rWED

i

.1

I

lrvarn if_ A-n ina fnr nnu 1'

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