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April 08, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OPENS TONIGHT .. .
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS presentF
THE PLOUGH AND THE STARS
by SEAN O'CASEY
Wednesday-Saturday, Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, 8:00 P.M. Box Office open
12:30-8:00 P.M. Phone 668-6300
WABX presents
BLOOD
'SWEAT 1
&TEARS!
Plus CASEY ANDERSON
Saturday, April 11, 8:30 P.M.
COBO ARENA,
TICKETS: $3.50, $4.00, $5.00, $6.00
Available at Cobo Box Office and Grinell's in Ann Arbor. MAIL
ORDERS: Cobo Hall Box Office, 1 Washington Blvd., Detroit,
Mich. 48226, enclose self-addressed, stamped envelope.

page three

i94.r

Sitt~iitan

ttii

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Wednesday, April 8, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

1 -1

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Vote

BALLOTING TODAY
Carswell

on

uncertain

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111 I

fr

STUDENT BOOK SGRVICg

KILLER SALE

THERE WILL BE LITTLE CHANGE in school desegregation
policies as a result of President Nixon's recent statement on civil
rights in education.
Secretary Robert Finch of the Dept. of Health, Education and
Welfare also set goal of doubling the number of black children at-
tending desegregated Southern schools next fall.
Finch's affirmative and aggressive tone at yesterday's news con-
ference may once again roil the school debate, which had prompted
President Nixon to issue a statement that several Southerners inter-
preted as easing government pressure on the South.
THE OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY announced
yesterday a new policy designed to prevent future conflict-of-
interest charges.
It prohibits for one year the awarding of contracts to firms
which hire former OEO officials and place them in senior positions.
The new policy was announced by OEO director Donald Rums-
feld in the wake of congressional charges of possible conflict-of-in-
terest.
r * *
SATURDAY'S SCHEDULED LAUNCH of the Apollo 13 will
not be postponed because of measles but still faces the threat
of a possible strike.
Blood tests revealed yesterday that the three, astronauts who will
soon transverse the lunar surface have a satisfactory immunity to
German measles. It was feared earlier that the astronauts might
not develop sufficient antibodies to withstand the disease during their
physically exhaustive flight.
Meanwhile, in Australia technicians at two tracking stations
were considering going out on strike to protest the dismissal of 36
other technicians. If they do strike the launch will be postponed.
CONGRESS passed a $24.8-billion federal schoolaid meas-
ure yesterday.
The bill, shorn of a Southern-sponsored rider on school desegre-
gation, authorizes the huge expenditure over a three-year period to
expand a wide variety of programs aimed at strengthening elementary
and secondary education.
Compromise language adopted in the final version continues to
recognize a distinction between the officially sanctioned segregation
that used to exist in the South and the kind common in the North
which results from racially segregated housing patterns.
* * *
THE WIFE OF SEN. PHILIP HART (D-Mich) was convicted'
yesterday on, charges stemming from a peace demonstration in
the Pentagon last November.
Mrs. Hart and seven other' leaders of the demonstration were
found guilty of deliberately attracting a crowd and obstructing the
normal flow of people and activities in the Defense Department con-
course.
She called the verdict "a surprise and a disappointment" and
voiced concern about the effect of the conviction on her husband's
hances for re-election this fall. "Some people will not vote for him
but others will because of this," she said.

CONTINUES

EVERYTHING ridiculously Reduced in Price

WASHINGTON (ff - Key Senate strategists backing the
nomination of G. Harold Carswell to the Supreme Court ack-
nowledged yesterday that they are uncertain whether he will
be confirmed in today's vote.
As the showdown draws near, senators on both sides of
the nomination are attempting to nail down the votes they
will need to win.
One informed source said yesterday that Carswell sup-
porters are worried that they might lose five or six of the
votes they captured Monday when the Senate voted 52-44
against returning the nomination to the Judiciary Commit-
I If this happened and there were no off-setting votes, the

ALL USED BOOKS
AT 50% OFF
AND MORE
ALL NEW BOOKS
AT 20% OFF
AND MORE.

-Associated Press
Florida official returns to job
Jack Davidson, Manatee County school superintendent, was re-
instated by order of a federal judge yesterday after Florida
Gov. Claude Kirk removed him from office and personally took
control of the Manatee school system, forbidding the school to
comply with desegregation orders.
WALKOUTS INCREASE:
Strikes continue as
labor disputes grow

ALL WEEK

Open till 9 P.M.

I

or

By The Associated Press
As labor continued to press its
demands nationwide, the Profes-
sional Air Traffic Controllers Or-
ganization (PACTO) was found
guilty of civil contempt by a Fed-
eral judge.
The controllers, who have slowed
most of the nation's air traffic by
calling in sick, are asking pay
hikes and improved working con-
ditions.

THE BLACK STUDENT UNION

presents

Roberta Flack

COMPROMISE STATEMENT
U.S. releases warning on pill

and

MUSIC INCORPORATED

-jazz group from New York

I

Saturday, April 11 -
'4:30 P.M.

WASHINGTON (-) - Gov-
ernment health officials a"an-
nounced yesterday a compro-
mise package warning for the
8%/2 million users of oral con-
traceptives.
The wording of the insert is
less stringent th an originally
announced b u t more detailed
than a watered-down version of
several weeks ago.
The 114-word statement will
be required in all boxes of oral
contraceptives after comment
from interested parties is re-
ceived in 30 days and acted on
by the Food and Drug Adminis-
tration (FDA).
Secretary of Welfare Robert
H. Finch offered this explana-
tion for shortening the original
600-word warning that listed
numerous possible dangers from
use of the pill:
M'

"A very lengthy statement is
not likely to be read anyway.
The size of the print is n o t
found to be easily absorbed."
The final wording states in
part: "Rare instances of ab-
normal blood clotting are the
most important known compli-
cation of the oral contracep-
tives." The other known compli-
cations are not listed.
The original proposal, an-
nounced March 4 by FDA Com-
missioner Charles C. Edwards,
referred to a "definite associa-
tion" between use of the pill
and clots. "The risk of this com-
plication is six times higher for
users than nonusers," it said.
The original went on to list
other reported side effects such
as mental depression, swelling,
skin rash, jaundice, high blood

pressure, and elevation of blood
sugar.
It referred also to informa-
tion women should receive from
their physician on oral contra-
ceptives and to proper inter-
vals for periodic examinations.
Organized medicine criticized
the Edwards draft for alleged
interference in the doctor-pa-
tient relationship. D r u g com-
panies faulted what they term-
ed unbalanced and negative
language.{
Planned parenthood groups
said the warning would unduly
frighten women away from oral
contraceptives.
The final warning is essen-
tially the shortened substitute
with added descriptions of
symptoms that indicate the
presence of clots.

Penalties for the contempt vio-
lation will not be decided until
Saturday but the controllers were
appealed to return to work if they
were physically able.
The judge found that the con-
trollers struck under "extreme
provocation" but declared "you
just can't strike against the gov-
ernment for any reason."
Other labor disputes grew in in-
tensity yesterday as truck drivers,
printers and postal workers ex-
pressed varying degrees of dis-
satisfaction with contracts and
contract proposals.
A strike by truck drivers dis-
satisfied with a tentative contract
proposal assumed nationwide pro-
portions yesterday as walkouts
spread to the East. The walkout
gained momentum in the Midwest
amid reports of violence aimed at
some truckers who stayed on the
job.
Drivers began the strike move-
ment in Los Angeles, Milwaukee,
St. Louis, Akron, Ohio, and other
cities over the weekend tot express
their disapproval of a tentative
national contract announced last
week in Washington.
Collective bargaining between
the government and officials of
postal employes unions - the first
ever agreed to by the federal gov-
ernment - continued as the gov-
ernment searched for ways to
finance a bill giving all civilian
and military federal workers a 6
per cent pay boost.

nomination would lose by oneC
or two votes, assuming only
96 senators are on hand for
the final vote.
But supporters of Carswell are
reported to be hopeful of picking
up the votes of at least two sen-
ators who backed the recommit-
tal motion. They also are working
to prevent more than three or
four switch-overs by those who
voted against recommittal. i
Meanwhile, opponents of t h e
nomination are trying to pick up
enough votes to reverse their in-
itial defeat.
Senators who are still uncom-
mitted are thus caught in a two-
way squeeze.
The key votes appeared to be
those of Sens. J. W. Fulbright (D-
Ark), Marlow W. Cool (R-Ken-
tucky), a n d Margaret Chase
Smith (R-Maine).
Fulbrighit deserted Southern
ranks, on Monday to vote f o r
sending the nomination back to
committee. C o o k voted against
the motion but has indicated that
he is troubled by the nomination.
Except for her vote against re-
committal, Sen. Smith has given
no hint of her stand.
One supporter said that some
senators whose votes could be cru-
cial are refusing to indicate which
way they are leaning. He added
that he did not think-the Carswell
supporters "h a v e any votes to
spare at this point." .
Meanwhile, Sen. Mark O. Hat-
field (R-Ore.) abandoned his un-
committed s t a n d, and said
through an aide he would vote
against confirmation. Hatfield
last week urged President Nixon:
to withdraw Carswell's nomina-
tion.
Senate Minority Leader Hugh
Scott of Pennsylvania t o 1 d re-
porters at the White House that
"the President is confident that
Judge Carswell will be confirm-
ed."
But other Republicans privately
conceded they were nervous over
the outcome. The Democratic
leadership was also cautious.
Tacticians on both sides men-
tioned only a few of the uncom-
mitted as being really unknown
quantities. Presumably, the oth-
ers have indicated privately what
they will do.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session publisbed Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

House unit
favors new
drug laws
WASHINGTON W) - T he
House Select Committee on Crime
yesterday called for reduced pen-
alties for possession of marijuana.
In a report, the committee sug-
gested a maximum one-week jail
sentence for first-offense mari-
juana possession, during which
the violator would be required to
take a drug abuse education
course.
The report also contained pre-
liminary findings of a marijuana
study undertaken three years ago
by the National Institute of Men,
tal Health.
The findings indicate that mar-
ijuana does not necessarily lead
to heroin addiction, but claim it is
a dangerous drug and might pro-
duce brain damage in "chronic"
users, when strong preparations
are used.
The committee's report main-
tained that present stiff penal-
ties for marijuana possession
were causing a diminished respect
for the law in general.
"The growing drug culture "is
rapidly undermining respect for
law and doing seriousrdamage to
the ability of the criminal justice
system to safeguard the lives and
property of the American people,"
said Sen. Claude Pepper, chair-
man of the committee.
"I think a jail sentence of a
week would be readily enforced,"
Pepperbsaid in an interview, "and
would be accepted by the public."
The Senate has passed a Nixon
administration proposal that the
present two-to-ten year penalties
for marijuana possession be re-
duced to a misdemeanor with a
maximum one-year jail sentence.
The committee report claimed
that marijuana traffic is an $850
million-a-year business at mini-
mum, and is leading increasing
numbers of young Americans into
tragic lives.
The committee staff computed
on the basis of raw government
estimates that six million people
used marijuana in 1969. They es-
timated 600,000 habitual users
spend at least $20 a week for a
total of $624 million, 2.4 million
spend at least $100 during the
year for a total of $240 million
and three 'million experimenters
spend an insignificant amount.
The preliminary findings on
marijuana effects were given by
Stanley F. Yolles, director of the
mental health institute, in re-
sponse to questions f r o m Sen,
Pepper. They included a study
showing that one-third to one-
half of chronic marijuana users
also try barbiturates and pep pills
and less than 5 per cent try nar-
cotics including heroin.
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

Union Ballroom
$1.50 at the door

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This is not encyclopedia, brush, or cosmetic sales, etc. Work by
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WRITE TO COLLEGE PROGRAM DIRECTOR, P.O. Box
68, Berrien Springs, Mich. 49103 OR CONTACT Mrs.
Cooper at the Summer Placement Office (SAB )

HI-Fl BUYS
Ann Arbor-East Lansinq
618 S. Main 769-4700
"Quality Sound Through
Quality Equipment"

I

1'- i
RADICAL FILM SERIES PRESENTS:
'TO DIE IN MADRID"
The Spanish Civil War is a period in history that most
civilized people would like to forget. And to some extent
it was forgotten until Frenchman Frederic Rossif cre-
ated this shattering elegy, a sensitively assembled docu-
mentation of a modern tragedy.

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