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March 21, 1970 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-21

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4

Saturday, March 21, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

SaedyMrh-1-97-H -CiA DIYPaeNn

... . ..,.. ..d,.. ., ...... ,. .,....,. _ _.. .._ .

- w W - W W- W - W W W WTJr. - .. i .. . ic. im. .. .re

B
By AL SHACKELFORD
Another exciting season of col-
lege basketball will reach its cli-
max this afternoon w h e n the
jazzy Jacksonville Dolphins (also
known as The Big Brokers) meet
perennial champion UCLA for the
national championship.
St. Bonaventure and New Mex-
ico State will provide an appetizer
-0 for the hoop fans as they meet for
third place before the main course
begins.
UCLA walloped the tough, Ag-
gies from Las Cruces for the third
straight year in tourney play, this
time 93-77, to advance to the fi-
,~nals and 'get 'a chance to continue
their boring monopoly on the
crown they have won for the past
three years. The Bruins h a v e
waltzed through this year's tourn-
ament without challenge; f a n s
are about ready to start yelling
"Fix."

Brokers

ba le

Bruins

Idailly
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
JIM KEVRA
WICKS, ROWE, Bibby, Vallely
and Patterson will again start for
the Bruins. Coach Lou Henson of
New Mexico State calls this team
"just as good and possibly better"
than the Bruin's recent Alcindor-
led squadrons. This year's aggre-
gation is tough on the boards,
they get great outside shooting
from Bibby and Vallely, use the
press well and play good defense.
They also have a strong bench --

or to put it another way, they
have no apparent weaknesses.
Jacksonville, however, does have
the raw talent necessary to de-
throne the mighty Bruins, b u t
they have shown a tendancy to
bumble in the late stages of their
games, most memorably against
Iowa and Kentucky.
JACKSONVILLE also could be
called a team without a weakness,
although they might be vulner-
able to the UCLA press. The Dol-
phins have the talent to stick the
Bruins, but UCLA's edge in ex-
The finals wil be held today
in both the NCAA and NIT bas-
ketball tournaments. Television
coverage of the NCAA games
starts with the' consolation
game at 2 p.m. on channel 4
and the championship game
will follow. Channel 2 will tele-
cast the NIT tournament start-
ing at 1 p.m.
perience should carry them to an-
other national title and 1 e a ve
them subject to investigation un-
der federal monopoly laws; but
maybe the Dolphins will be able
to breathe some fresh southern
air into the smog-ridden national
crown.
St. Bonaventure will be t h e
sentimental favorite to beat New
Mexico State in the consolation
game because of their gutty per-
formance against Jacksonville. In
that game, t h e Bob Lanier-less
Bonnies broke into a 13-3 lead
before returning to earth and los-
ing 91-83 as the Dolphins sank
an almost unbelievable 35 tosses
from the charity stripe.

on this and that
Harvey Blanks
goes to court
eric siegel
EVENTS, A CHICAGO newspaperman once observed, move in
and out of headlines like the tides - they're in in the
morning and out by the afternoon. That observation has more
truth today than it ever did. Today's page one story is buried
somewhere in the middle of tomorrow's paper; a day later,
it doesn't even appear in print.
All this is merely by way of introduction to a subject
that has been in the headlines of various publications across
the country intermittently since early last fall - the
subject of the black athlete.
One of the athletes whose name figured rather prominent-
ly in those headlines was Harvey $lanks. Blanks, you will re-
member, was one of four black football players at the University
of Washington suspended by head football coach Jim Owens
last October 30 for failing to give "100 per cent committment
to the football prograin."
Sometime in the next year or two, Blanks' name should
be back in the headlines. Blanks, who will be a senior in the
fall and was an All-American candidate before he broke his ankle
before the start of the season, is planning to go to court to get
reinstated on the football team.
"We plan to file an action within the next week or so,"
Gary Gayton, one of two, Seattle lawyers who are working
on the case, said over the phone the other day. Gayton,
whose brother Carver resigned as assistant coach shortly
after Blanks' suspension, said the civil action will be filed
in federal court and be based on "about 15 counts."
One of the major contentions of the suit will be that by
suspending Blanks, the University is depriving him of his
possible livelihood, Gayton stated.
John Lackland, one of two representatives of the state
attorney general's office working on the case for the University,
said Wednesday that 'As a lawyer,- you can sue for anything
you want, but I don't agree with their reasoning and I don't
think they have much of a case."
Lackland's own reasoning is bolstered in part by a de-
cision handed down by a federal judge in Wyoming in
regards to a similar case involving 14 blacks who were
suspended from the University of Wyoming team last fall.
In that case, the judge ruled that it was the perogative of
Wyoming Coach Lloyd Eaton to suspend, a player or group
of players as part of his coaching job.
It is this "perogative" that Blanks will be challenging,
contending that his rights supercede any "perogative" of his
coaches. His suit, in fact, will be based on the Federal Civil
Rights laws.
There is also something of an "extenuating circumstance"
that makes Blanks' contention more tenable. The other three
players who were suspended along with Blanks on Oct. 20 were
reinstated ten days later. At the same time,. Blanks was per-
manently suspended from the team.
According to the offical University position, Blanks was
permanently suspended for "problems not solely related to
the events of Oct. 30." Gayton, however, was a little more
biting in his appraisal of the reasons for Blanks' permanent
suspension. "First they suspended him because he wouldn't
give them loyalty," Gayton said. "Then they suspended him
for everything he ever did."
Blanks case has already had some positive results. Uni-
versity officials have promised to review the charges of racial
discrimination in the athletic program, although, somewhat less
positively, it has said that such a review would not come until
after the case had been decided in the courts. In view of 'the
original suspensions of the four athletes, and in view of Coach
Carver Gayton's resignation because of a serious "communication
chasm" between himself and Coach Owens, the review is sorely
needed.
But Blanks and his attorneys are still hopeful that the case
will be decided before next season. Blanks has just one year of
eligibility left; under NCAA rules, he must play out his eligibility
at Washington or not play at all.
A t Meanwhile, the case of Harvey Blanks, a case which his
laywers have vowed to take to the Supreme Court, has made
the 20-year-old black athlete something of a hero. "Some
people consider him a rebel," says Gayton, "but most people
consider him a leader."

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Come ... Bring a candle ... Walk with us
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~CLIEN~fl

-Associated Press
MATT GANTT of St. Bonaventre (with ball) pulls down a
rebound during Thursday night's NCAA semifinals game with
Jacksonville at College Park, Md. Dolphin ace guard Rex Morgan
guards Gantt as Bonnies Tom Baldwin (30) and Greg Gary (23)
watch.

FACE WARRIORS

Redmen go after NIT crowni

By AL SHACKELFORD '
Marquette, t h e number eight
team in the country, will face the4
quick Redmen of St. John's to-
day in the finals of the National
Invitational Tournament at Madi-;
son Square Garden.
Both teams were tabbed as good
bets to make the finals; Marquet-
te breezed past Massachusetts,
Utah, and the LSU team of mis-
firing Pistol Pete Maravich, while
St. John's has picked up hard-
earned victories over Miami of
Ohio, GeorgiaTech, and Army.
Michigan f a n s will remember
Marquette for the 86-78 defeat
they absorbed at the hands of our
fast breaking Wolverines back in
1969, but the Warriors of 1970
bear no resemblance to the quin-
tet that Michigan beat. T h e y
looked very tough in shelling LSU
101-79 behind a 28-point per-
formance from front court brawl-
er Joe Thomas and a fine triple-
teaming defensive job which held
the Tigers' Pete Maravich to 20
points.
MARQUETTE is a tough de-
fensive team which hits the
boards like a locomotive, often
outrebounding much taller teams.
They get g o o d scoring balance
from forwards Gary Brell a n d
NBA "drops
Houston
franchise
'NEW YORK (IP-Houston has
been dropped from the National
Basketball Association's expansion
plans for the 1970-71 season and
the NBA will start next season as
a 17-club league, it was announced
Friday by Commissioner Walter
Kennedy.
"The simple fact is that Hous-
ton could not come up with a nec-
essary payment before our college
draft next Monday," said Kenne-
dy. "And the possibility that they
could not do so was discussed at a
meeting of our owners last Mon-
day in Chicago."

Thomas and center Ric C o b b;
smooth Dean Meminger and ex-
cellent outside shot Jeff Sewell
are a fine guard combination.
St. John's brings a fine squad
into the tournament it has won
four times, more than any other
team; playing at the Garden is
just like playing at home for the
Redmen. This will be coach Lou
Carnesecca's last g a m e at the
helm of St. John's, and he has
guided his team to a 21-7 record
this season and a career record of
104-34. He will become head

coach of the ABA's New York
Nets next year.
CARNESECCA'S REDMEN are
led by 6-5 forward Ralph Abra-
ham and 6-4 guard Joe DePre,
both explosive scorers and key
men in St. John's aggressive de-
fense. Six-foot ten pivot man Bill
Paultz and 6-6 forward Richie
Gilkes provide enough height to
battle bruising Marquette on the
boards and, along with playmaker
Richie Lyons, round out the St.
iJohn's starting five.

THE
BUS. AD. MAJOR
SAID
STATI STICALLY:
MILLER
MAKES IT RIGHT!

11

W.e know
what
you want
towear
Because
you
told us.

HEAR CANDIDATES FOR SGC
4 All 3 Presidential Candidates
MARTY SCOTT
BRUCE WILSON
JOE GOLDENSON
* Candidates for Member-at-Large
MON_ 7_7:0-UNION ASSEMBLY HALL

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