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March 21, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-21

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 21 1970

PaeEih TEMCHGN1AL

-f! ....,_ . -.3 . n .

I

Charter Flight to EUROPE
COST: $215 per person
LEAVES JUNE 6th: Windsor to London
RETURNS JULY 6th: Amsterdam to Windsor
Open to University Students, Faculty, and Employees
$100 DEPOSIT PAYABLE TO CONLIN,
TRAVEL BUREAU IS NECESSARY
MAIL RESERVATIONS TO:
DARYL L. BARTON (761-0838)
1316 GEDDES, NO. 1
ANN A~RBOR, MICHIGAN 48104

Ruggers, stickmen
face weekend trials

ROOKIE SPARKLES

0~

GM9

batsmen fall

to

Arizona, 6-5

By BILL ALTERMAN
Besides music and dope, Oberlin
College is known for one other
thing-lacrosse.
Last year the men from Ohio
finished third in the Midwestern
Conference and they are just as
good this year. All of this may
well become evident this after-
noon when Michigan faces Ober-
lin atOberlin.
Also on the road this weekend
is the Michigan Rugby club which
travels across the border to play
Windsor. Tomorrow the ruggers
MM

(5th AN N UAL)

f

DE BATE OF THE CENTURY !

start their home schedule with a
1:30 game against Penn State on
Ferry Field.
In the 2 o'clock lacrosse game
at Oberlin, Michigan will be try-
ing to break their two game los-
ing streak incurred on their re-
cent trip to Virginia. The two
rugger losses on their eastern trip
were dealt by VPI 4-2 and Roan-
oke 14-7. Though disappointed
with the results, coach Skip Flan-
agan was pleased with the trip.
Flanagan is also pleased by the
play of mnidfielders Dan Lamble,
Kim Rodgers and Ken White. One
area where Michigan has b e e n
getting into trouble however, is
penalties. Roanoke was able to
score half of their 14 goals while
a man up.
Another source of joy for the
Michigan team should be provid-
ed by the return of Tom Mid-
daugh to the attack. Middaugh
was unable to go on the Virginia
trip because of a wedding cere-
mony - his own. Flanagan also
expects to get an improved game
in the goal from Jay Johnson
who, according to Flanagan, didn't
play too well in "the Old Domin-
ion."
IN ITS FOURTH year of play,
the Michigan lacrosse team should
show a marked improvement.
Though they have a tough sch-
edule, a number of excellent play-
ers are returnees with the exper-
ience needed in forming a cohes-
ive unit.
In today's rugby matchup,
Michigan's Gold (club) team is
making the trip. Sunday it will
be the Blue (representative) teams
chance to s h o w their stuff.

Special To The Daily
TUSCON, Ariz. - There was no
President to throw out the first
ball but it is doubtful that even
that momentous event would have
helped the Wolverines who opened
up their 1970 baseball season with
a 6-5 loss to the Arizona Wildcats.
For the Wolverines, the r u 1 e
that allows freshmen to participate
in varsity baseball must be very
popular. It has provided them
with the opportunity to have a
young lad by the name of Tom
Kettinger on the team. T h e
freshman left fielder was respon-
sible for all of Michigan's r u n s
with two homers and a double.
In the second inning, w I t h
Arizona pitcher Jim Provenzano on
the mound, Kettinger blasted a
385 foot shot over the left field
wall to give the Wolverines their
first tally. Two innings later, he
doubled off the left field wall and
was later driven in by Dan Fife,
the newly chosen captain of the
basketball team.
Finally, in the eighth inning,
Mark Carrow walked, Tom Lund-
stedt reached base safely on an
error and Kettinger came through
again, this time with a 400 foot
blast. This homer gave him four
runs batted in for the day. His
three hits in four times at b a t
coupled with his four RBI's made
his debut with the Wolverines
quite impressive.
Despite Kettinger's fine per-
formance, the rest of the Wol-
verine offense was virtually dor-
mant. Only two other players hit
safely, Fife and Lundstedt, how-
ever this was Michigan's f i r s t
game and little can be done when
they faced a team which has been
practicing all winter and is well

"Blowing the lid
right off the
Scandal of the
Environment!"

"THE LATKE (yes ...?)
THE H AMANTASHEN (yes .

.. )

and the

INNER ENVIRONMENT"
(what. )

PRO'S

IN THE
MUDDLE

CON'S

DR. ROBERT GREEN MD

MRS. PEG KAY
Nutrition Expert

PROF. CARL COHEN
Philosopher

PROF. BEVERLY POOLEY
LLB, SJD
PROF. LEONARD
GREENBAUM
Phoenix Project

The Je ishCSchool
of ANN ARBOR
is looking for Sunday School teachers for
kindgergarten through eighth grade. Strong
Jewish background and teaching and/or
program skills.

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under way with its regular season.
In the pitching department,
Michigan's number one mound
acb, Jim Burton, worked six in-
nings and gave up five runs and
eight hits. Added to this he struck
out five and walked seven. Sopho-
more Ed Bryson finished up the
game, working the last two in-
nings. He gave up no runs or hits
in his stint.
The star for the Wildcats was
firstbaseman Rod O'Brien who
reached base safely five consecu-
tive times with two doubles, a
single, a walk and an error. He
drove in two runs and scored three
times himself.
MICHIGAN
AB R HI
Carrow~ (3b)' 3 1 0
Bowen>(f) 3 0 0
Lundstedt (c) 4 1 1
Kettinger (f) 4 3 3
IFife (rf) 4 0 1
Rafferty (ss) 2 0 0
Solomon (lb) 2 0 0
Bower (ph) 1 0 0
Makowski (b) 1 0 0
Ball (2b) 3 0 0
Roberts (ph) 1 0 0
Burton (p) 2 0 0
Brso ()1 0 0
Totals 31 5 5
Mermaids
drop to sixth
Special To The Daily
NORMAL, Ill. - Despite fine
performances and several new
team records, Michigan's women's
swimming team slipped from
fourth to sixth place in a field of
60 at the close of the second day
of the first National Intercollegiate
Swimming and Diving Champion-
ships for Women.
Lannie Loken led her team-
mates in the scoring, diving to a
343.31 point total and a second
place finish. Johanna Cooke se-
cured a ninth in the 200-yard in-
dividual medley with a time of
2,29.45, while teammates Jan
Pfleeger and Barbara Patterson
set team records in the 50-yard
backstroke and the 50-yard but-
terfly. Pfleeger took eleventh with
:31.49 in the back and Patterson
placed eleventh in the fly at
Coach Sandi Hittelman ex-
pressed a somewhat optimistic
outlook for today's final compe-
tion. "We have a strong200-yard
freestyle relay squad, and we're
expecting some top performances
from Cooke in the 100 yard breast-
stroke and Loken in the three
meter diving. We should finish
near the top."
Scores
Exhibition Baseball
Detroit 8, Minnesota 6 (11 innings)
Cincinnati 10, Philadelphia 5
Baltimore 7, Los Angeles 2
Houston 3, Atlanta 1
New York (A) 4, Montreal 3
New York (N) 4, Kansas City 3
St. Louis 8, Pittsburgh 4
Cleveland 6, Chicago (N) 1
California 2, San Diego 1
Boston 5, Chicago (A) 0
Oakland 11, Seattle 5
High School Basketball
Pontiac Central 84, Garden City W. 79
Pershing 82, Midland 71
River Rouge 82, Bay City All Saints 61
Calton 88, Muskegon Heights 86
St. Ignace 76, Pontiac Catholic 72
Muskegon Christian 84, Stockbridge 59
Kingsley 69, Camden Frontier 63
Flint Holy Redeemer 74, Wakefield 64
NCAA Hockey
Clarkston 4, Mich. Tech 3
NBA
Milwaukee 136, Philadelphia 112
Seattle 123, Boston 119
Atlanta 110, New York 102
Baltimore 138, Chicago 131

I&e aeviAi
Bill Cusumano
COLLEGE PARK, Md.-Some smart reporter thought that
New Mexico State could beat UCLA. I guess that puts me In the
Joe Falls class as a forecaster.
But I still think that the Aggies could have pulled it off,
UCLA was ready to be taken Thursday night, particularly in the
first half. Remember this, New Mexico State took more shots
and had less turnovers, a combination that made the Bruins
extremely vulnerable to defeat.
The Aggies couldn't hit the shots even though many
were easy follow attempts and after a while UCLA's pre-
cision shooting took its toll. The difference finally proved
to lie in the shooting percentages, the Bruins once again
proving that they can be the most deadly gunners in the
nation when they are on.
One person that I have to second guess though, Is New
Mexico State coach Lou Henson. Henson ran players in and out
of the game like he was managing a little league team with a
minimum playing requirement for each athlete. Never once was
his team able to establish any continuity as the players never
were in together long enough.
Henson later explained that he wanted to wear UCLA down
and then catch them in the last five minutes. It sounds like a
weak plan for a team to use when it's ranked in the top five
and it proved too useless. Any team, much less UCLA, with a 26-2
record is obviously in good enough shape to go a full 40 minutes.
Henson also inexplicably pulled 6-10 Sam Lacey out of the
game for eight minutes in the first half when the Aggies were
still within two to. seven points of the lead. Lacey had pulled
down seven rebounds in nine minutes and was to finish the
contest with 16, tops on the court. When he left, Sidney Wickes
and Curtis Rowe had a definite advantage on the glass.
Lacey also scored the first two times he had the ball; then
the Aggies stopped feeding him. Wickes, Rowe, and Steve Pat-
terson all had three fouls in the game and Lacey could have
drawn a few more. Instead the New Mexico State guards Jimmy
Collins and Charlie Criss played Earl Monroe style and gunned.
It all added up to an easy Bruin win because UCLA has
the kind of team and style that takes advantage of such
disargar ization. The Bruins are easily the most disciplined
team in college basketball, the group that comes closer than
any I've ever seen to perfection of execution. They just run
pattern after pattern until someone is cut loose for the open
shot. And you can bet that the shot will drop about 70 per
cent of the time.
On the other end of the court UCLA's combination of size
and extreme quickness make it one of the toughest man to mah
defensive squads in the country. John Vallely and Henry Bibby
go chest to chest with their opponents and every shot is earned.
Up front the forwards are fine defenders aid shot blockers,
Wickes being a particular terror.
This is a fine team, a team that could, and did, easily de-
molish a New Mexico State squad that made a strategic mistake
in its attack plan. It is such a strong team in execution that
an error costs an opponent four points, two that its lost and
two that the Bruins gain. For them to make more turnovers
than New Mexico State was a miracle, because they possess
amazing basketball sense. One can safely wager that the same
statistic will not occur against Jacksonville in today's cham-
pionship game.
The road comes to an end for the Cinderella Dolphins today.
They're a lot of laughs but UCLA is all business and won't even
smile until it's all over. Then the Bruins should howl.
Another year of chasing UCLA lies ahead for the rest of
college basketball. Jacksonville has come as far as it can
this year and might as well start preparing for the next
chase. They should have incentive though because Wooden
and his Bruins have not seemed to be too happy with
Jacksonville's antics and the comparison of Gilmore and
Lew Alcindor. They want to kill to prove their superiority
and just might destroy Jacksonville without mercy.
But that's the story of UCLA, overkill. Even their cheer-
leaders are superior to the rest (oh, you better believe they're
superior). The team is in the same category as the girls, they've
got perfect bodies and movement to go with it. Look for UCLA
to ring up at least 100 points while roaring to at least a 15
point win. Let's see if that will redeem my Falls image.

on-SUNDAY, MARCH 22' (PURIM NITE)--8 P.M.
with-HAMANTASHEN FOR ALL!

op

at -THE HOUSE

1429 HILL STREET

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL
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ONTRAVEL
1970 Summer Jet Flight Schedule
DETROIT METRO DEPARTURES

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Japan
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Depart
May 4
May 5
May 15
June 21
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July 5
July 12

Weeks Return
5 June 9
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12 Aug. 20
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8 Aug. 26
6 Aug. 31
8 Aug. 30
3 July 31

Cost
$189
199
219
229
229
419
239
259

NEW YORK DEPARTURES

El

SGC

London 8
London 9

May 17
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13 A ug . 14
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