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March 21, 1970 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-21

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 21, 1970

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ADMISSIONS ISSUE
Lack" of, U' commitment vs. lack of faith

DAILY O0,FFICIAL BULLETIN

1 t

(Continued from Page 1)
The only BAM demand rejected
outright by the Regents was the
tuition waiver for in-state dis-
advantaged students. BAM pre-
sented the plan as a simple means
of alleviating the financial burden
for students admitted under spe-
cial programs.
Fleming first said the plan
might not be legal, but Dave Lewis,
Grad, presented a legal paper
showing precedents for the waiver,
and even Ross says now that the
University could probably win a
legal battle over the plan.
Both he and Fleming say the
legislative reaction to a waiver
would hurt the University. "There
is no difference how you give fi-
nancial aid since it has to come

out of some pocket," Fleming adds,
implying that money lost by the
tution waiver would be cut out of
financial aids.
The Coalition to Support BAM,
in a seven-page handout, main-
tains that such cuts should be
made elsewhere, if the University
re-orders its spending priorities.
The phamplet cites ROTC, war-
oriented research, the placement
'service, alumni association and
University golf course as programs
whose elimination would yield over
$1 billion, even though the Uni-
versity does not pay the full cost
of them all.
Revitalization of the Martin
Luther King Scholarship Fund and
revision - of, the Parents' Confi-
dential Statement were two other

BAM demands unmentioned by
the Regents.
According to Ross, the parents'
statement, criticized for its un-
realistic financial criteria, is pres-
ently being revised. Fleming says
that small foundations are now
being contacted for the King Fund
and conceivibly any funds raised
elsewhere could be channeled
there.
But the lack of any mention of
the fund, much less a guarantee
of money, in the Regents pian
goes right back to the basic ques-
tion of who trusts whom.
"It's very hard to tell four years
in advance where we'll get the
money," Fleming says. "We don't
want to promise something we
cannot produce."
He points to the present situ-

Students charge police racism

ation in Lansing where Gov. Wil-
liam Milliken has proposed a bud-
get whose sucess depends on the
passage of a number of new tax
bills.
It is a year of tight money and'
a general election, which makes
the tax package's success uncer-
tain, at best.
"Unless that new tax program
goes through, we could have a very
rough year," says Fleming, adding
that state priorities for higher
education are the lowest in 15
years.
Architecture Prof. J o s e p h
Wehrer says that many instruc-
tors believe that no matter how,
much money is provided, the black
students with the ability to "make
it just are not out there."
But Smith says, "We don't know
how big this pool (of qualified
students) is, because we have
never exploited to the full. Junior
colleges have hardly been touched
at all."
Goodman agrees and adds, "I
can see a recruiter out of our of-
fice involved full-time in com-
muity college recruiting."
Several administrators, includ-
ing Fleming and Ross, have placed
heavy emphasis on the need for
experimentation withadmissions
criteria so only students with "a
probable chance of success" will
be ,admitted.
Goodman discounts that, say-
ing, "The major responsibility in
reaching the goal rests in our shop
at the recruiting level." And that
takes money, the one - recurring
stumbling block in the whole pro-
gram.
The Regents committed $500.000
to the OAP, $100.000 to recruiting
and $170,000 to the black studies
program and community center
for next year. BAM says it is not
enough and both the Regents and
administration agree.j
Where they differ is on the,

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A B 1d g.. before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices a re not accepted for
pnlication. F o r more infortna-
tion, phone 764-4270.
SATURDAY, MARCH 21
Day Calendar
Monolingual Demonstration: Dr. K. L.
Pike, "Language by Gesture", Univer-
sity Reformed Church, 1001 E. Huron.
1:00 P.m.
Arab Organization Symposium: "Pal-
estine, the Arabs, and Zionism", Assem-
bly Hall, Mich. Union, 1:00 - 9:30 p.m.,
Degree Recitl: Jay Gayer, violin,
School of Music Recital Hall, 2:30 p.m.
Degree Recital: Barbara Jack, organ.
Hill Aud., 4:00 p.m.
University Philharmonia: New Music
for Orchestra, Theo Alcantara, conduct-
or, Hill Aud., 8:00 p.m.

Mihifisl Annual Water Show:
Margaret Bell Pool. 8:15 p.
Regents' Meeting: April 16 and 17.
Communications for consideration at
this meeting must be in the President's
hands no later than April 2.
Pilot Program Concert: Carol Mac-
Callum, flute, David Volckhauser,
piano, to play Bach and others, R e d
Carpet Lounge, Alice Lloyd Hall, Sun-
day, Mar. 22, 2:00 p.m.
Piacemepid Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Peace Corps Week March 30 - April
3 Rm. 3529 SAB, no appts. nee., will
speak to campus groups, call Miss
webber (764-7460).
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICES
212 SAB, Lower Level
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Elmhurst. Ill., summer forectry pro-
gram, good salary.

Rosetti Assoc.. Det. Exec. secretary formed Church, 1001 E. Huron, 9:30
for May - July, shorthand, speed writ- a.m. - 3:30 p.m. today.
ing req.
Oak Park, Mich., exams for recrea- Free University Festival in the Mich-
tional jobs, apply now. Igan Union Ballroom tonight! Leaves
Chicago Horticultural Society, Chi- of Grass and Cats Cradle will provide
cago, Ill. Students in botany, forestry, msc
and related areas. work in botanic gar-
dens.archisCoalition lo i
o°'ganizational mneeting. Monday, March
23. 1970 at 7:30 p.m. in Rm. KLM. Un-
ion. Subject: Ecology Action in Ann
1161N Arbor.
U9nivcrsity LutIheran Chapel: marc;:
N ~rI'Et t im 22, 9:30 and 11:00, 1511 Washtenaw, ser-
J I1 vices with the Rev. Prof. Donald Moss-
man, Preacher.
International Sing at Bursley Hall.
Michigan Christian Fellowship: mis- (north campus), Sat., Mar. 21, 7:30 p.m.
sions workshop. "Communicating with Social Hour follow'ng. Sponsgred by
! language minorities", University Re-, International S'udents Assoc.

,.
s
a

(Continued from Page 1)
As further proof of Miss Banks'
innocence, the two blacks claimed
that she does not have the
strength to lift and heave the
brick which smashed the window.
In another incident, the blacks
said they witnessed a black and
a white demonstrator struggling
with police.
The police were striking both
demonstrators initially, but then
freed the white protester while
continuing to hold and beat the
black, the two, blacks said.
A second black, Michael Marsh,
'72, was arrested when he attempt-
ed to climb into the police car
holding Miss Banks to accompany
her to the police station. . Both
black and white demonstrators
struggled with the police to free
the arrested black girl, the two
black demonstrators said, but only
Marsh was arrested.
Eric Siegel, '71, a white student,
said he was standing between two
blacks when the three of them,

h
,
4.
Y

were approached by a pair of po-
licemen.
The policemen advanced quickly
together as they neared the three,
Siegel said, then split up and be-
gan striking and shoving the
blacks, leaving him untouched.
"It seemed clear to me that the,
police weregdefinitely after the
blacks," Siegel said.
Another white student, Alan
Kaufman, L'72, said he drove a
severely beaten black student to a
local hospital to be treated for
injuries.
"He was so badly hurt that he
could not walk without assistance
and he could barely talk"' said
Kaufman.
"It seemed to me that if the
demonstrator had been doing any-
thing criminal enough to rate such
aebeating, he probably should have
been arrested," Kaufman com-
mented..
"But he wasn't arrested," Kauf-
man said. "Which makes one won-
der if he had done anything at
all."

When Kaufman asked the in-
jured demonstrator why he had
been beaten, he mumbled a pa-
thetic "I don't know," Kaufman.
said.
Coming onto the scene of the
demonstration after the violence
had begun, Kaufman said he was
impressed by the fact that mainly
whiteswere throwingrocks but
only blacks were being apprehend-
ed and jostled by the police.
The black demonstrators made
the same observation.
"I don't want to imply that only
whites were hassling the police,"
one black said, "or that blacks
were idle during the activity."
"But the police singled out
blacks to beat and arrest, and
those are the facts," he claimed.
Prof. Carl H. Fischer of the bus-
iness administration school spent
two days at tha University 'of

if you want a
summer job, call
Manpower".'
" The pay is good.
" You can work when you please.
" The experiencewill help you later on.
That sound you hear is Opportunity, knocking.
If you're a gal-and you have some secretarial
skills-we'll put you to work. If you can type,
operate various office machines or handle some
stenography... knock knock knock.
If you're a guy, you might want factory or ware-
house work-indoors or out. We've got both...
and both can help you build up your experience
...and your bankroll. But we can't call you...
so call us. Knock knock knock.
In 400 offices throughout the United States
Manpower specializes in finding the right peo-
ple to do the temporary jobs that have to be
done. We've been at it for 21 years, so we know
what you're looking for. Why' not deal with the
best. When you're home on vacation come on in.
Knock knock knock knock.
MANP®WER
TEMPORARY HELP SERVICES
An Equal Opportunity Employer

U I
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SUITS
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SLACKS
SHIRTS
SWEATERS
Also Bigs
Sizes to 54
in~ SUITS & SPORT
COATS
SLACKS to Size 60
ANN ARBOR
CLOTHING
211 S. Main St.

Manitoba at the invitation of firmness of the Regents' commit-
the School of Commerce, con- ment in passing the plan, and
ferring with and speaking to stu- neither side seems' to be making
dents and faculty members. headway on that.'

ONE DAY SALE-SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 1970

VA

w

HAPPY BIRTHDAY
JOHANN SEBASTIAN
ALL BACH RECORDS ONE-THIRD OFF
WATCH FOR IN STORE
SPECIALS CHANGING
MONDAYS tr THURSDAYS
iscoutrecords
1235 S. University, 300 S. State-Ann Arbor
Hours: M-F 9:30-9, Sat. 9:30-6. This Week Both Stores Sunday 12-5

Subscribe to The Michigan Daily

BACH ; The St. John Passion
ONLY $5.97 During Sale

P.S.

'U

SUNDAY, MARCH 22, 1970 IS A
MYSTERY SALE AT BOTH STORES.
You'll Have, to Come to Find Out

WORSHIP

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
At Stote and Huron Streets
Church-662-4536
Weslev-668.6881
Hoover Rupert. Minister
Bartlett Beavin. Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken. Comous Minister
Activities-Week March 22-29
SUNDAY
6:00 p.m.-Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Program-Vietnam presentation
with slides.
SATURDAY
8:00 p.m.--Eoo Colorina Party.
SUNDAY
6:00 a.m.-Sunrise Service.
7:00 a.m.-Sunrise Breakfast, Pine Room.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL-CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holv Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Mornino Prover and Sermon.
7:00 o m.-Evenina Prover
ST. AIDAN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
1679 Broadway
lat Baits Drive-North Campus)
12:15 p.m.-Holv Eucharist.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L C.-L.C.A.
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. - Matins, also Biblical Study
Group.
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
1 :00 p.m.-Parents' Day Dinner and Pro-
gram.
THURSDAY
7:45 p.m.-Narrative Eucharist.
FRIDAY
7:45 p.m.-Vespers and Tenebrae Service.
CAMPUS CHAPEL.
(corner of Forest and Washtenaw)
Minister: Rev. Wesley Smedes
10:00 a.m.-"The People at the Cross." Min-,
ister: Rev. Wesley Smedes.
6:00 p.m.-"The Age of Pusillanimous"-
John Braun.
7:30 p.m. - Slide - Lecture'Presentation:
"Christian Art in the Church."
UNITY CENTER OF
PRACTICAL CHRISTIANITY
310 S. State
663-4314
Mrs! Eleonore Krafft, Minister
Sunday Service-111 :00 a.m.
Study Class-Mrs. Krafft-7:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Prayer and Counselinq-10:00 a.m. Wednes-
day.
Center Is Open-Mondav, Wednesday, Friday,
I I -2: Tuesday, 3-6 p.m.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
493 S. Fourth Ave.
Telprhone 665.6149
Ministers: T L. Trost. Jr., R. E. Simonson,

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
( The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 11:00 a.m.-Services.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta Supper-
Program.
Wednesday at 10:.00 p.m,-Midweek Service.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Ministers: Calvin S. Malefvt and Paul Swets
10:30 a.m.-"Those Hopeless Situations" -
Calvin S. Malefyt speaking.
5:30 p.m.-Colleaiate Supper.
7:30 p.m.-Concert-Hope College Chapel
Choir of Holland, Mich.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc. phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Terry N. Smith, Minister
Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
9:15 and 11:00 a.m.-"And We Should Cry
a Little, Too."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services, Sunday School

I

THE ARK,
1421 Hill-761-1451
Communol Dinner.

I

CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Mavnard
11:00 a.m.-For sure. ol s any oher time we

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