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March 20, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-20

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Prie4ritt AAnrAft WN 1 Mel

0

rricaay, march LV, I v /U

1

art-
A mediocre venture
Into,' using terra cotta

Beatlemania:
A 7 year itch

,e
.

I ~--

By LAURIE HARRIS
Ceramics have always been
part of our society. But today
it is rare that one would think
of them as art. However, the
art of the ancient Greeks, Egyp-
tians and other lost civiliza-
tions revolves around their styles
of pottery and the patterns used
to decorate them.
The Ceramic Show presently
exhibiting in the Museum of
Art in conjunction with the
Creative Arts. Festival, is, in a
manner, an assertion of every-
day items into the realm of art-
istry. But too often the show
displays only that which has
been seen in the area of Ann
Arbor.
The object of the festival is
to bring talent and art to Ann
Arbor that is not usually viewed
in the area. But the effect 'bf
the ceramics show, as a whole,
places Stanger's in equanimity
with an art museum.
One cannot doubt that B o b
POTENTIAL
REVIEWERS
The Daily is looking for re-
cord reviewers of pop, rock,
and any other kind of music.
Call 761-0135 for further in-
formation.
Black's people pots are charm-
ing, But I would guess that
they have been seen a multitude
of times before. It comes to the
point that you believe Black has
capitalized on something that
struck gold and is having dif-
ficulty in separating avarice
from creativity.
But the luminous plates of
John Loree and the undulating
vases of J. T. Abernathy create
a wonderful diversion from an
otherwise mediocre show
Each plate is glazed in deep
rich tones and utilizes a strong
sense of color and line. Loree
has taken a unique phase in
portraiture by applying faces to
the discs, and each is carefully
worked and designed.
Abernathy's oversized vases
are decorated in simplistic
black-brown paint ,which curves
in an almost oriental pattern.
The vases themselves, curve in
patternrs, not conventional to
any time, but purely original.
Their rhythms are almost like a
stream of consciousness as the
eye tries to run smoothly around
its bulging curve and finds itself
obstructed by deep, smooth in-
dentations.
It is a pleasure to know that
Abernathy's studio is so close
at hand, on State St. next to
Marti Walker's.
And though it has been hinted
that Abernathy did not enter
his best pieces in the exhibit,
the rest of the show hardly
maintains his calibre or that of
Loree. The other artists h a v e
dabbled in the art of ceramics,
sometimes succeeding in s m a 11
details, but generally presenting
trite motifs in a supposedly in-
geniousmanner.
Acombination of ceramic and
aluminum is attacked by John
Stephenson. His work is the
most daring, leaving the tradi-
tional areas of ceramic and
delving into a sculpture attempt.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.
CHEKHOV'S
short story,

0DLUEL
SOVIET FILM VERSION o
Friday, March 20
S7 and 9 p.m.
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But his work lacks dynamism
where it seems to be striving for
it and it lacks the simple grace
of Abernathy's vases. What it
does have is ingenuity, and for
this reason becomes interesting.
Suzanne Stephenson's work is
smooth and clean. She calls her
objects "domed vases." But, if
you just think about the shape
of a domed vase, you come back
to that old modernistic theme of
eroticism swathed in what ever
it can be swathed in.
Tom Larkin's compilations in

black ceramic are at once inter-
esting, but only for about that
long. They lack any real creativi-
ty. In fact, they seem only to be
more rustic works patterned af-
terned after an Italian artist
who creates houses and people
much in the same manner.
And of course, just 1i k e in
Stanger's, (that new-found art-
museum), the works are mostly
for sale. But now you get to say
that you bought them in Alumni
Hall - doesn't that have a nice
ring to it?

LONDON (P) - The Beatles
are dead, long live the Beatles."
Putting his feet up on a desk
and munching a piece of cho-
colate cake, John Lennon ap-
peared to refer to thegroup
in the past tense: as if they had
already expired.
In many ways the Beatles of
old have. The Beatles of 1970
are something vastly different.
It's more than seven y e a r s
now since Beatlemania burst on
an unsuspecting world.
Lennon, Paul McCartney,
George Harrison and Ringo
Starr worked together and help-
ed start a youth revolution. But
the Beatles of today are married
men, all approaching 30. They
are bound together economically,
but they haven't staged a live
concert together for more than
two years and Ringo has said
they never will again.
"It's like an era is over," Len-
non said in an interview. He is
the only Beatle who goes daily
to the $1 .2-million Apple offices
in London's Savile Row. But
his activities there are mainly to
do with his peace campaign and
the various avante-garde v e n -
tures he pursues with his Japan-
ese-born wife, Yoko.
An exhibition of lithographs
by Lennon showing him and
Yoko making love was raided by
Scotland Yard detectives at a
London art gallery in January.
And he even managed to shock
some of London's way-out set
with a 42-minute film shocker
called "Self Portrait" which is
in fact a prolonged study of his
own sexual organs.
"It was a gag, a cartoon,"
said Lennon.
Lennon and Yoko had their
hair cut short during a visit
to Denmark in January. They
fThe
other
odor
No feminine spray
can stop it.}
The "other" odor. It starts in
the vaginal tract where no spray
can work. You can't spray it
away. And it's more offensive
than external odor caused by
perspiration.
That's the reason you need
Norforms®...the second deodor-
ant."' These tiny suppositories
kill germs-stop odor in the va-
ginal tract for hours. Something
no spray can do. And doctor-
tested Norforms can be used as
often as necessary. They insert
easily, quickly.
Get Norforms' protection for
the "other" odor no spray can
stop.
The second deodorant.

-Daily-Jim Diehi
A vase by J. T. Abernathy

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are donating the fallen locks to
raise funds for a black welfare
center in London.
The other three Beatles still
sport long hair and beards. They
appear to show little interest in
Lennon's obsession with t h e
peace cause.
The Beatles appear to have
one useful lesson of survival;
to ration the Beatles to them-
selves as well as their public.
The bickering between Len-
non and McCartney became so
bad at one time that Ringo
Starr, the 29-year-old drummer,
walked out on the group in dis-
gust. Then George Harrison, 27,
claimed he wasn't getting
enough of his songs on the
Beatles' albums.
Now Ringo and George are
making their own albums, and
Ringo is building himself a
second career in films. He re-
cently starred alongside P e t e r
Sellers in "The Magic Christ-
ian."
Music, the great common ob-
sesion, has changed for the
Beatles.
Ringo has developed a taste
for oldies and is making an al-
bum of songs like "Night and
Day" in a 1920s sort of voice.
Harrison, whose love of the sitar
first interested the Beatlesin
Indian music, remains fascinat-
ed by guitar techniques and is
still rated the best instrumental-
ist of the group.
air f re
to Europe
Icelandic has the greatest
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OSTERGREN
NEXT WEEK:
MICHAEL COONEY
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BARRY O'NEILL
THURS., FRI., SAT.
SUN.---BOB WHITE
9 PM
1421 Hill STRET

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NPxe:OI

Speak Russian with Russians in
Moscow This Summer! Why Not!
The Tour group will fly to Moscow around August
2nd. Other cities visited will include Leningrad, Nov-
gorod, Kiev, and probably Black Sea resort towns.
Tour costs include jet economy from Detroit to Mos-
cow and return to New York, all transportation and
accommodations in the Soviet Union, plus visa fee
and baggage and accident insurance. Cost of the
program (not including tuition or accommodations in
Ann Arbor) is $790.00.
The Tour will be led by a member of the Department
of Slavic Languages. In the Soviet Union students are
provided numerous excursions to places of cultural
and social interest. Considerable free time is avail-
able to engage in informal contact with Soviet citi-
zens (who are most eager to communicate with Rus-
sian speaking Americans).
Unfortunately, fellowship money is not available
through the department. However, in past years
hundreds of students have begged or borrowed the
needed funds and enjoyed this unique experience.
The language learning achievement is unusual and
the cultural development is unequalled.
Ask the Study Tour secretary at 3074 Frieze Bldg.
for information and applications. All materials must
be returned by April 5.

w,

CHILDREN'S PRICE-AT ALL SHOWS

"Dazzling!
A vivid STURGES PRODUCTION
experience.
thrilling!A
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in space!"
-i A.Time! from ColumbaPictures

M 1

_NO EVENING SHOWS-TUES., MARCH 24
"TRIBUTE TO KING-MONTGOMERY TO MEMPHIS"
ONE SHOWING-8:00 P.M., ONLY
March 19 & 20-Thursday, Friday
TRO;UBLE IN
PARADISE
dir. ERNST LUBITSCH (1932)
Herbert Marshall as high-society pick-pocket.
The Lubitsch touch: a tragedy of manners.
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 5C AUDITORIUM

UOF MEN 8:30 P.M.
G L E E C L U B TICKETSALES AT HILL BOXOFFICE
A P R I L 3 H I Block Ticket Sales March 24-26
TO R General Ticket Sales March 30-April 3
Tickets Prices: $3, $2.50, $2
U M U OF M
MENSGLEEC MAILORDERS TO:
Uof M Mens Glee Club
L UB A P I L 3 6048 Administration Bldg.
HILL AUDITORI Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104
UM U OF M PHONE 764-7265

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