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March 20, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
presents
"Three Dog Night"
SUNDAY, MARCH 22, 1970
8:30 P.M.
Bowen Fieldhouse, E.M.U., Ypsilanti, Mich.
Tickets: $3.50, $4.50, $5.50

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

C14C

Sfiri'tian

atin

page three
Friday, March 20, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

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Advance Tickets
University Center,

Available: E.M.U. McKennv
J.L. Hudson Co.

Union, M.S.U.

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WEST GERMAN CHANCELLOR Willy Brandt met yesterday
with East German Premier Willi Stoph in Erfurt, East Germany
to begin talks on a new course for the divided country.
Brandt was received enthusiastically. It was the first time any
rival chiefs of Germany met face to face.
Stoph demanded full diplomatic recognition of East Germany by
Bonn and $27.3 billion in reparations for economic losses allegedly
suffered by the flight of three million East Germans to the West before
the building of the Berlin Wall.
Brandt rejected the demand for formal recognition. He sug-
gested instead that the two governments consider setting up per-
manent working facilities for representatives in East Berlin and Bonn.
The chancellor spelled out six basic principles of his government's
position in the Erfurt talks including the duty of both countries "to
preserve the unity of the German nation."
AN OFFICIAL of the U.S. Information Agency (USIA) re-
fused yesterday to give the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
details of opinion polls conducted by the agency in South Viet-
nam.
Edward Nickel said he acted under instructions from the USIA
director Frank Shakespeare, on the ground that the matter is under
review due to "possible security elements involved."
The refusal prompted the committee chairman, Sen. William
Fulbright (D-Ark) to remind Nickel that his panel must pass on
funds for the USIA. However, Fulbright denied later to newsmen
that he was threatening to withhold funds.
Nickel, who heads the Joint United States Public Affairs Office
in Saigon, also refused to answer a question by Fulbright on whether
any USIA officials serve as fronts for the Central Intelligence Agency.

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Ilea mail1
sri*ke spreads.
fromNY
NEW YORK (M - An illegal two-day strike of government
letter carriers spread from New York yesterday, halting all
postal service to an estimated 17 million persons - from. cor-
poration presidents negotiating million dollar deals to pen-
sioners living for the postman's arrival with their next check,
Even the United Nations was affected, as members of the
striking AFL-CIO National Association of Letter Carriers con-
tinued their defiance of federal court back-to-work orders.
Private sources in the securities industry said the stock
market might have to close Monday if the strike continued.
No end appeared in sight before Saturday, when New
York letter carriers are scheduled to vote on whether to end
the first such walkout in the

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a

DR. STRANGELOVE
Starring PETER SELLERS, GEORGE C. SCOTT
with shorts: LONELY BOY, starring Paul Anka
GOD IS DOG SPELLED BACKWARDS

MARCH 20-21, FRI.-SAT.
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL

7 and 9:30 P.M.,
75c

161-year history of the
Post Office Department.

U.S.

Recognize

"There's nothing wrong with having a law de-
gree."-Joseph Strick
Sunday-GUNGA DIN with Cary Grant
PLUS REAR GUNNER with Ronald Reagan, and
Desi Arnaz and his Band

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HELD OVER -ENDS MONDAY

MONDAY-MARCH 23
TEACH IN FOR
SOVIET JEWS
11:00-1:00 P.M.-Library, Winchel House West Quad
"Jewish Life in the Soviet Union"
Dr. Gene Sosin-Berlin, Germany
Joseph Ben Dak-Research Sociologist C.R.C.R.
SPONSORED BY
CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON CONFLICT RESOLUTION
1:00-3:00 P.M.-The MUG, Michigan Union
"Effective Action for the Soviet Jews"
Harold light-Chairman of the Bay Area
Council on Soviet Jewry
SPONSORED BY THE COMMITTEE ON SOVIET JEWS
4:30-6:30 P.M.-Residential College
"The Jews of Silence"
Jay Masserman-U of M Medical School
Dee Wernett--Residential College

-Associated Press
DEMONSTRATORS SIT and lie down to block the entrance to a
draft board inNew York's lower Manhattan. The demonstrators
were later taken into custody by the police.
Non-vtolence marks
draft board sit-ins

By The Associated Press ?
Demonstrators and those dem-
onstrated against sought to avoid
violent confrontations yesterday
as a week-long nationwide protest
against the military draft limped
through its fourth day with gen-
erally small turnouts.
In Syracuse, N.Y., police and
2,000 demonstrators cooperated in
a careful orchestration of the na-
tion's largest protest allowing
those who wanted to be arrested
to do so without violence. In New
York City protesters lined up for
their arrest by police.
Draft board offices in San
Francisco and San Rafael, Calif ,
New York City and San Antonio,
Tex., were closed, but except in-
New York officials said the clos-
ures were ordered to catch up
with paper work.
In Grand Rapids, Mich., a token
group of five demonstrators was
allowed in the federal building to
block the entrance to draft board
officeswhile two dozenprotesters
remained outside.
In Dayton, Ohio, Selective Ser-
vice officials let 50 young men
and women conduct a peaceful oc-
cupation of t h e i r offices while
work continued.
Hundreds of persons were ar-
rested, mostly f o r peaceful ob-
struction, in activities spanning
the nation, but violence colored
fW aa a than.n. h.n fl of the inci-

ies, but only about half a dozen
drew more than 100 people.
In Philadelphia, which had one
of the larger protests as 35 per-
sons gathered at an induction
center, demonstration leaders oQ-
enly expressed disappointment
with the turnout. Six busloads
of riot-helmeted police were on
hand, but there was no violence
and at one point an officer on the
police radio reported his men out-
numbered protestors 3 to 1.
In Washington, DC., a crowd
estimated by police at about 350
blocked the entrance to the na-
tional headquarters of the Selec-
tive Service System carrying a
black coffin they said contained
draft cards.
Uphold draft
deportation
WASHINGTON (R) - T h e
Board of Immigration Appeals
yesterday upheld the deportation
of a young Georgia man who fled
to Canada to avoid the draft and
then renounced his U.S. citizen-
ship.
In a 4-1 decision, t h e board
held that Thomas Glenn Jolley,
26, of Atlanta is an alien who
voluntarily chose to abandon his
native land in 1967, even though
he returned two months later.

Late last night letter carriers
for the Newark post office, largest
in New Jersey, roared unanimous
approval to go on strike.
The walkout, set for 10:30 p.m.,
was expected to cripple mail serv-
ice in Newark, financial and busi-
ness hub of New Jersey. The
strike vote in Newark spread the
walkout by New Jersey mailmen
to eight of the state's most Pop-
ulous of the 21 counties.
Mail from abroad was diverted
from Kennedy airport, where pos-
tal facilities were tied up by the
strike.
The New York Commerce and
Industry Association said its 3,500
members reported "serious disrup-
tion" of day-to-day business af-
fairs. Association President Ralph
Cross added: "The insurance
companies and the banks who de-
pend so heavily on mail are the
hardest hit. But there's no com-
pany so small that it's not af-
fected."
The Ann Arbor post office said
local mail to New York has been
coming back, and asked that Ann
Arbor residents not send any let-
ters to New York as long as the
strike continues.
Western Union reported its tele-
graph business up 20 per cent.
Messenger services found a heavy
demand for their facilities, espec-
ially to deliver checks and per-
ishable items.
William Carroll. deputy direct-
or of the New York postal region,
was asked what would happen to
a perishable item marooned in a
struck p o s t office. He replied:
"Well, it will just have to perish."
A New York Stock Exchange
spokesman, surveying efforts by
financial and othe'r firms to cir-
cumvent the mail tieup, declared:
"All it takes is a little ingenuity.',
Fairchild Publications sent all
its paychecks for Chicago and :ts
bureaus to the west of Chicago by
commercial airline for mailing
from there.

eieCambodia
By The Associated Press
The United States recognized
the n e w post-Sihanouk govern-,
ment in Cambodia yesterday while
worried officials feared that trou-
bled land might slide into civil
war and become Southeast Asia's
"second Laos."
The decision on recognition was
announced by the State Depart-
ment which used a formula de-
signed to evade the issue as much
as possible. A spokesman an-
nounced that "for constitutional
reasons the question of recogni-
tion does not arise."
This means the United States
holds that the continuity of gov-
ernment in Phnom Phen lies in
the constitution and is unaffected
by the ouster of Prince Norodom
Sihanouk as chief of state and the
designation of Chen Heng, leader
of the National Assembly, as his
successor.
U.S. officials expect, in fact,
that the new leadership will be
more friendly than the old and
that its efforts to do something
about t h e North Vietnamese
troops in Cambodia territory
along the borders of South Viet,
nam should clearly benefit U.S.
interests.
Some of the best informed U.S.
officials s a y Sihanouk himself,
who is now in Communist China,
probably holds one key to whether
his nation will be plunged into
new violence or given a chance
to develop political stability. But
others also have decisive choices
to make, including t h e Khmer
Rouge, the Communist party of
Cambodia and the associated
North Vietnamese.

9

Iei
de
Daily Classifieds Get Results,
Tues., March 24 and Wed., March 25
THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES PRESENTS
il Retablo de las Maravilias
by MIQUEL DE CERVANTES
(a one act farce by the author of Don Quiiote)
AND
i:El Triilo
r by FERNANDO ARRABAIL
(from the theater of the absurd)
8 P.M. Lydia Mendelssohn Theater
TICKETS: $2.00, $150 at Lydia Mendelssohn
.,.;yr ickietoffice*
.r..v:M} t G:!::{;' :, .. .v .::2r: ;,-,. ..v. . .... h..3..... .. ..}:nA::{{}...:}~i::i: s:

'wer man a ianiiv acnu
ents.
During the day protests were
ported in nearly two dozen cit-

HOMECOMING '70
now accepting petitions
for
Central Commttee

i

JOIN THE SPORT OF THE SPACE AGE
PARACHUTING SERVICE
TECUMSEH, MICHIGAN
Michigan's Most Active
Sport Parachuting Center
Saturday, Sunday, Holidays
For Information Call-
MON.-FRI.--291 -3634
WEEKENDS-423-7720
ENJOY SKYDIVING AT ITS BEST
Classes Start 11:00 Sat. & Sun.

PAR4A*-W, --WSP--SE. NYAN,, M4,g iMAWDC l4
ROBERT REDFORD !/GENE HAcKMAN/cAMILLA SPARV
DOWNHILL RACER EWBYJAMESATERGN aEE ;

2nd floor UNION

UAC Offices

1O F IFTH Forum
I FI~l FT4 AVENUE AT LIBERTY
D111 OWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMATION 761-8700

Fri. and Sat. 7:10,9, 10:50
Sun. 7:10, 9:00

For more info call 763-1449
1A? -YOUR ACTION CENTER

-

09

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+

Use Daily Classifieds

+

'TATE
O. IT,

HELD OVER!
2nd WEEK
SHOWS AT:
FE 1:00-3:00-5:00
7:00 & 9:10 P.M.

Z"::.:.: i{.

ELEC TIONS
Tuesday & Wednesday, March 24-25
- President-Vice-President4
5 Council Seats

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NOMINATED FOR 9 ACADEMY AWARDS

6MB1EBU1YIOUSB
presents
A MIXED MEDIA THEATRE SITUATION
combining the elements of film, sound, live performers, and
"fantastic" sets with an accompanying object environment.
The notion of various media in relation to openings or parts-
specific parts in a given condition-or the word, "garage"; how

"BEST
:r PICTURE
OF THE YEAR"
-National Board
':r of Review

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