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January 14, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-14

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THE MICHIGAN DA11_1

Wednesday, Jan

THE ICHIAN DILYWednsday Ja

Leary proselytizes at Hill...

sciousness. People now, through
"natural biological means" can
change what they are. They
can be anything they want to
be. They can do anything they
choose. The great American
dream fulfilled - perfect free
choice.
Although Leary does not be-
lieve that everyone should take
,acid regularly (everyone should
take it at least once) he sees
the ability of it and other psy-
chedelic drugs to change reality
as a powerful motive force for
change. Indeed he envisions a
great youth revolution forming
around that truth. Drugs, along
with the other "keys to revolu-
tion," sex and rock and roll,
will .bring a change in this
country in the next decade.
'But the other side of the revo-
lution, the power generation,
has its own drug culture. Hark-
ening to the motto "for God's
sake feel bad," the holders of
power have been on a bad trip
since the evil of God of the Old
Testament "exiled Adam and
Eve to northern Michigan."
The older generation a drug
culture? You bet ! The world is
filled with establishmentarians
strung out on booze. And that
drug, says Leary, fits them per-
fectly. "It makes you feel so
bad the next day for being such
a bad boy."
But this ethic, the Judeo-
Christian desire to be unhappy
will die, says Leary, in the face
of a new joy. "For God's sake
feel good" reads the new for-
mula. And, much as it may
shock the sensibilities of the
power generation, "You can't
overdraw your ecstasy bank ac-
count."
Unfortunately the influence
of that other side of the revolu-
tion which feels worse when-
ever they hear anyone else feels
good, was not entirely unfelt.
There was not the joy of years
past. Everyone was subtley
aware of the specter of repres-
sion. John Sinclair is in jail.
The crowd could laugh with
Leary about getting high but
the knowledge of struggle and
hard times was with them. They
could see the truth of Leary's
visi6ii but to face the meaning
of the revolution is more diffi-
cult..
But, as Timothy Leary ex-
plains, "Dope is the greatest
revolutionary instrument of all
time." He is even passing out
Kim Agnew medals to kids who
turn their parents on.
This time around in the spin-
ning of many lifetimes you can
be anything ,you warnt. "Why
don't we free John Sinclair this
time around. Why don't we all
make it, this time around."

*0 as

the

bands

born bout

A
mu""

BILLY

By BERT STRATTON
The John Sinclair benefit con-
cert last night at Hill Aud. was
painful. There must be more
pleasant ways of extracting
donations for the Sinclair de-
ferse fund than by subjecting
a crowd to the Up, Teegarden-
and Van Winkle, and the
Stooges.
Of course, it's doubtful that
these music groups attracted the
sizeable crowd, considering that
the ever popular "high priest"
of psychedelics, Timothy Leary,
was also on the bill. Leary is a
visionary, always perceptive, and
always joyfully entertaining in
his eccentricity.
The Up are not visionary, in
fact they are blindly untalented.,
What they can do proficiently
is turn the dials on their amps
up to 10, play three chords
LOUDLY, and screech haphaz-
ardly throughout their songs.
The Up's lack of creativity is
reflected in their repertoire.
What else could one expect but
a looking backward" approach,
into their rock 'n' roll roots.
They tried Little Richard's "Lu-
cille," which in the original ver-
sion features Little Richard's
amazingly controlled shouts and
the inevitable, raspy tenor sax
break. I've heard that when
Paul McCartney wanted to learn
how to shout, he asked Little
Richard to teach him. Well,
the Up's lead singer should make
an appointment with Little
Richard too, but then again why
bother because nobody can un-
derstand what he's singing any-
way, over the prickling, jabber-
ish noise of the two guitars,
and the labored smash-bash de-
livery of the drummer. (There's
no sax.)
OK, the Up's sound is admit-
tedly out of the.realm of normal

music criticism. Their latest hit
is titled "Just Like an Abori-
gine," which is about the most
accurate description there is of
where they're at. Somehow they
come on more belligerently than
I ever imagined any ape could.
Leary followed the Up, which
was a vital hiatus for most of
the crowd. A few jokes, a little
philosophizing on the generation
gap, a couple visions of future
life, and we were all primed up
again for some more music.
The duet of Teegarden and
Van Winkle provided the as-
sault. With, I believe, Teegarden
on drums and Van Winkle doing
vocals and organ, they jumped
into an elementary jazz-blues
riff, and for about the next
twenty minutes they stayed
right there, the vocalist running
together a series of tunes over
the same blues pattern, plodding
back and" forth on the organ
between two or three notes, and
the drummer following along.
It takes a lot of nerve to try
to work out in a jazz-blues
framework with only two musi-

cians, because the song can get
very boring if there isn't enough
soloing. Well, the drummer
didn't do a single solo, and the
organist stuck close to home,
conscientiously avoiding any of
the million possible variations a
talented organist would have
chosen from.
How do they get away with
this junk? They're very tricky,
and they're very talented
"rock" evangelists. Direct from
the farm in Muskogee, Okla-
homa, Southern drawls intact,
they make the now common
"authenticity" pitch. They're big
on audience handclapping and
"Are you ready?" appeals to the
crowd. They are groovy, and
they smoke dope and are high
on stage. All things considered
they're quite "beautiful" and
really bad musicians. (The drum-
mer finally did a solo on their
last song, another extended
blues-he did about ten minutes
of nothing, hardly even touching
his cymbals.)
The Stooges were to be on
next. I left.

C+--

-Daly--Jim Judhis

CINEMA GUILD
American Studies
Program
Jan. 13, 14-lues.;, Wed.
BIRtTH OF A NATION
IDir. d. W. Griffit~h, 1 91 5

VANAVER
Electra-Recording
Artist

Griffith built a
ment to the noble
7 & 9 75c
662-8871

monu-
South.
Arch.
Aud.

Superb guitar,
banjo, tamboura
S uperb sense
~of humor
Great performer
Funny as hell!

NOW 4TH WEEK,

l 1

Shows at
1,3,5,7,9
William Faulkner's Pulitzer Prize-Winning
Novel "The Reivers" is now a film!
"'The Reivers' fills one with a
joyous sense of life and laugh-
ter. A marvelous time is had by
al."-New York Magazine
Steve McQueen
The Reivers{
witsh
SHARON FARRELL
and WILL LEER

DIAL
5-6290

W0 p~ ~
Nu&41w
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Order Your Daily Now-
Phone 764-0558
THURSDAY, FRIDAY-JANUARY 15, 16I
RED RIVER
Dir. HOWARD HAWKS, 1948
Montgomery Clift ploys the son of a ruthless cattle
baron, John Wayne. The legend of the west as only
Hawks can portray it.
"John Wayne's all right, but why did they give it that name?"
-1. McCarthy
7 &9 759ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 5C AUDITORIUM

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I PANAVSION┬░-TECKNICOLOR6
United Artists
SHOWS A7
1:60, 3:40, 6:20, 9:00 P.M.

I

CLASSES BEGIN THURSDAY
JANUVARY 15, 1 970
AT 7:30 P.M. IN THE
IM WRESTLING ROOM
All Interested Players are Welcome to Attend
COEDUCATIONAL

i

BACH CLUB
presents
DR. RICHARD CRAWFORD
speaking on
"BEETHOVEN'S EROICA SYMPHONY"
Refreshments and FUN afterwards
Everyone welcome! (No musical knowledge needed)
WEDNESDAY!, Jan. 14-8 P.M.
1236 Washtenaw (at S. Forest, near S. Univ.)
TRANSPORTATION provided to and from meeting
For transportation call: 665-6806, 761-7/356,
769-2033, 663-6221
Further info: 663-2827,7674-983, 764-9887 (Jenny),
764-1671-Doug)

THE DEPARTMENT OF URBAN PLANNING

PresentsZ
MEL RAVITZ

I

I

iii

U1

President of the Common Council, City of Detroit,
Professor of Sociology, Wayne State University

U

NO CLASSES
Thursday, January 15
MORATORIUM
Strike Against Imperialism and Racism

SPEAKING ON
"THE RELATIONSHIP OF CENTRAL
CITIES TO THEIR SUBURBS"

I

DATE:
PLACE:

THURSDAY 15th, JAN. 1970
ARCHITECTURE AUD.-A. & D. BLDG.

I

.

TIME: 4 P.M.
Ali Members of the Public Are Very Welcome

WEDNESDAY
HOUSE FORUM

EAST QUAD-NOON to 5:30
7:30 to MIDNiTE

-U

1

"A
OF

NEWSREEL FILMS (including Vietnam North)
SPEAKERS/DISCUSSION/DISPLAYS

1

I

1I

Fight for the "Right To Live"
WELFARE DINNER
to benefit Michigan Welfare Rights Organization
Thursday. January 15

THE SELF AND THE NON-SELF:
MYSTICISM, DRUGS AND THE OCCULT
DR. JOHN POLLARD, Dept. of
Neuropsychology, U. of M.
Medical Center
DR. ARYEH STRIKOVSKY,
Prof. of Jewish Mysticism,
Detroit College of Jewish Studies

I ~She1is woman:

!k

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