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January 14, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-14

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YOUNG DEMOCRATS
MASS MEETING, WED., JAN. 14
8:00 P.M., Assembly Hall, Michigan Union
HELP PLAN PROGRAMS FOR 1970
" STATEWIDE STUDENT CAUCUS
* STUDENT VOTER REGISTRATION
" COMMUN ITY ACTION
1970-A TIME FOR CHANGE. JOIN US!!

I

Tuition increases plague nation's colleges

ByThe Associated Press
The University was able .to hold the
line on tuition costs this term, but many
other schools in the country were less
fortunate. A recent Associated Press
survey revealed that inflation and gen-
erally higher education expenses have
resulted in increased tuition and room
and board fees at several public and
private schools across the country.
University officials have declined to
rhake any definite predictions on next
year's tuition here, but they say it will
depend upon the State Legislature's ap-
propriations.
Some schools have already planned
for increases, however. At Yale, for ex-
ample, tuition will go up $300, from

$3,600 to $3,900. Ten years ago it cost
$2,300.
The figures represent an increase of
almost 70 per cent. They include only
tuition and room and board, no books or
incidental living expenses.
At New York University, tuition alone
has risen about 42 per cent in the past
eight years and will go up another $175
to $2,450 a year next September.
At the University of Montana, tuition
. and room and board is 24 per cent high-
er this year then it was in 1965-66. In-
creases for the coming year are being
discussed, although no figure has been
set.
The increases vary from a few dollars
to several hundred. Officials blame and

boosts on higher salaries for teachers,
rising construction costs, general in-
flation, need for new equipment, more
expensive housing and cutbacks in fed-
eral aid.
Iowa State University in Ames, a state
owned and operated school, raised tui-
tion $75 per quarter to $200 per quarter
last fall:Room and board, now $810 for
a normal academic year of three quar-
ters, will increase about $40 per quarter
next fall.
An ISU offical said the increases were
necessary because of a lack of funds ap-
propriated by the state legislature cou-
pled with inflation. "It costs more to
operate the same scientific equipment
this year, not to mention buying new

lab equipment, than it did last year,
simply because of inflation," he said.
Tuition and fees at Duke University
will go from $2,000 to $2,100 a year
next September. A spokesman said the
major factor was a wage increase for
nonacademic employes whose earnings
will go from $1.60 to $1.80 an hour.
Lawrence University in Appleton,
Wis., will increase its comprehensive
fee-tuition and room and board-from
$2,955 to $3,300 a year next fall. Spokes-
men for the school said increases were
in line with university policy that stu-
dents pay 45 per cent of their educa-
tional cost.
See RISING, Page 6
NEWS PHONE:
764-0552

..e._ _..._ .__._ _.__ ...__ _.

We're looking for people who like to write.
And even people who don't
(but like to know what's going on).
MASS MEETING Thursday Night
for all future MICHIGAN DAILY reporters
See you on the 15th in the Daily library, 420 Maynard St. at 7:30

page
three

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Wednesday, January 14, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

the
news foday
by T he Associated Press and College Press Service

JOINING UPJOHN

Cancelled

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FOR EVERYONE
* Rejected +rDeclined
We also write motorcycle and motorscooter insurance.
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JOSIAH SPAULDING, former chairman of the Republican
party in Massachusetts, announced his candidacy today for the
U.S. Senate seat held by Edward Kennedy.
Spaulding, who has never been elected to public office, declined
to say if he felt Kennedy's fortunes would be affected by the senator's
auto accident on Chappaquiddick Island.
On Vietnam, Spaulding said, "I simply do not approve of the.
war." He added that he backed Nixon's intentions to reduce American
involvement.
Spaulding challenged Kennedy to "face-to-face" debates, but
said he did not think Kennedy would accept.

482-9533
234 W. Michigon
Ypsilanti

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95% OF THE READING POPULATION READS ONLY 250 TO 300 WORDS PER MINUTE OR LESS
All those who completed courses held this
winter at the Bell Tower Hotel achieved speeds
of 800 to 1800 w.p.m. with the same or
increased comprehension they had at their
slower reading rotes.-

SEE HOW EASILY YOU CAN:
-save hours, use your time more efficiently
-learn to read 3 to 10 times faster than
you do now
-improve your comprehension and. increase your
enjoyment of reading material
at a cost less than HALF that of nearly all
other commercial reading courses!

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_ _-

WELFARE SECRETARY ROBERT FINCH accused Congress
yesterday of preparing to scuttle the Nixon administration's wel-
fare reform proposal.
"This revolutionary proposal is being threatened with death by
invisibility at the hands of a Congress apparently too preoccupied
with other matters even to offer alternative proposals of its own,"
Finch said in a speech to the National Press Club.
Finch cited public opinion polls showing a strong positive reac-
tion to the welfare reform plan as well as strong editorial endorse-
ment, in the nation's newspapers.
The question is "how to prevent fundamental welfare reform
under the banner of the President's plan, or any other plan from be-
ing scuttled by Congress," he said.
VICE PRESIDENT SPIRO T. AGNEW said yesterday thatj
while some Asian leaders publicly criticize the U.S. presence in I
their nations they privately want the Americans to stay.
On his flight to Australia from Bali, Indonesia, Agnew said,
"Most of the general impressions that come out of the Asian gov-
ernments are not as forthcoming as their private consultations."
Five persons were arrested during a round of heckling and
shouting as Agnew laid.a wreath at Australia's War Memorial. Some
demonstrators later showed up at his hotel as he left for dinner with
Prime Minister John Gorton.
Agnew was welcomed by a small pro-U.S. demonstration at the
Australian leaders residence.
MEMORIAL SERVICES scheduled across the nation in honor
of the birthday of the late Martin Luther King Jr., were open-
ed yesterday with the singing of the civil rights leader's favorite
hymns by a Brooklyn antipoverty agency.
At least three governors have issued proclamations regarding
observances of King's birthday, January 15, but the observance will
not be the national public holiday that some civil rights leaders
have urged.
,King's body was removed from Southview Cemetery in Atlanta,
Monday night, in accordance with his widow's wishes, and interred
in a plot adjacent to the Ebenezer Baptist church where he served as
co-minister with his father.
The transfer, made without fanfare "as a matter of taste and
dignity" according to Mrs. King, is the first step toward permanent
entombment in the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park.
s * s
THREE BLACK PANTHERS,,two of them organizers from
party headquarters in California, were arrested yesterday after
police said one of them pulled a gun during a routine check of
their automobile.
Theodore Smith, 40, Oberlin, Ohio, was charged with illegal
possession of the gun and reckless endangerment. His companions,
Thomas P. Jolly, 28, and Robert L. Bay, 25, both of Oakland, Calif.,
were booked on charges of harassment and conspiracy to commit
reckless endangerment.
A lawyer for the men called the arrests part of a scheme by
police to harass members of the Black Panther party.

Bring a book to a free, live demonstration of the reading skills which will be taught in a GUARANT.EED
-course offered this summer. A course will be offered the spring session as well as the spring-summer
session.
Demonstration Tuesday and Thursday January 13th and 15th, 7:30 P.M.,
at the Bell Tower Hotel, 300 So. Thayer St., across from Burton Tower

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Med schoo dea t leave
Dr. William N. Hubbard Jr., di-
rector of the Medical Center and
dean of the Medical School, will
join the Upjohn Co. on April 1,
"' ' ' with responsibility for its pharm-
::: ::'::= :. {."aceutical division.
,"" " Upjohn President R. M.' Boude-
man made the announcement yes-
terday.
Dr. Hubbard has been a mem-
ber of the Upjohn board of direct-
ors since December 1968.
President Fleming will appoint
a committee to consider a succes-
sor to Dr. Hubbard as dean of the
Medical School and director of the
Medical Center. The Medial C
};, ter includes the Medical and Nurs-
..: ing schools and University Hos-
pital.
Dr. Hubbard has been dean of
the Medical School since 1959, and
is a professor of internal medi-
cine.
Commenting on his appoint-
, ' *}. ' ment, - Dr. Hubbard said, "After
11 years as a Medical School dean
::.:::...°...: v :<: at Michigan and eight years as
assistant and associate dean at
-..- New York University, I was at-
tracted by the stimulus of a new
Dl. t H bbardset of responsibilities. The course
of the pharmaceutical industry is
committed to the production of
CTORS TO TESTIFY- agents that are effective and safe
beyond doubt, and my familiarity
with the uses of science in the
public interest will be most use-
ful in the transition from t h e
University Medical Center setting
to the pharmaceutical industry."
Dr. Hubbard added that "the
OT n r nsecure administrative structure
and strong faculty we have in the
University's Medical Center' as-
ASHINGTON (P)-Research- or that it has no effect on cancer." sure the continuity of the vital
ho suspect birth 'control pills- Nelson said 8.5 million women programs that are established and
ausing sterility, genetic dam- in the United States now use the those that are developing."
and cancer will lead off testi- pill, plus another 10 million else- Upjohn President Boudeman
y this week as Congress takes where. He said millions of others said, "Dr. Hubbard's reputation
irst look into the safety of have stopped using the pill. in the field of medicine and his
contraceptives. Current FDA regulation require proven ability as an administra-
ght doctors and researchers, makers of the pill to include in tor will bring able leadership to
ally all critical of some as- each shipment to druggists a list the company's pharmaceutical di-
of the pill, have been called of suspected side effects. Nelson vision."
stify today and tomorrow be- said however, that the list often Fleming said, "Our very great re-
the Senate monopoly sub- is not passed on to users. gret at losing the administrative
nittee headed by Sen. Gay- The British Committee report ability and w is e counsel of Dr.
Nelson (D-Wis.). on Safety of Drugs warned t h a t Hubbard is eased in part in know-
e purpose of t h e hearings, use of pills containing more than ing that his talent will continue to
n says, is to "explore t h e 0 micrograms of estrogen need- contribute to the field of medicine
ion of whether users of birth lessly increased their risk of ser- and to Michigan through one of
ol pills are being adequately ious, disabling and even fatal the state's leading enterprises."
med concerning the pill's blood clotting. About half the
ri health hazards." pills in use in the United States The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aide to Nelson said that if are believed to contain 60 to 100 aged by students at the university or
list of witnesses appears micrograms of estrogen. Michigan. News phone: 764-0552.n econd
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
hted against the pill it is be- The high-estrogen pills include igan, 420 Maynard - St., Ann Arbor,
"it is impossible to ,match all the sequential type. Women Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
'one's testimony." taking sequentials use estrogen- day thrcugh sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Suzbscription rates: $iO by
7e have some people who will only pills during most of their carrier, $10 by mail.
y it causes blood clotting and menstrual cycle and a combina- Summer Session published Tuesday
er," said the aide. "But we tion of estrogen and another fe- through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
couldn't get anyone to say male hormone the rest of the tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
ill has no effect on clotting time. mai.

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W E NEE YU
SELLNG ABILITY!
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business experience, then you
are eligible to join our new
advertising sales force beginning
in the fall.
Part-time jobs are open on the
Michigan Daily to sell advertising
and create new advertising markets.
Earn money on a commission basis
while you gain valuable experience.
(We are especially seeking salesmen
who have access to a car)

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