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March 18, 1970 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-18

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Wednesday, March 18, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Sever

Wednesday, March 18, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

myeSee

Spring,
By MORT NOVECK
As the sun edges ever closer to
the vernal equinox on its eternal
path around the ecliptic, y o u n g
men's minds are supposed to un-
dergo a mysterious metabolic
transformation and turn from such
weighty thoughts as whether it's
worth getting up for a 1:00 class,
to lighter pursuits like whether it's
worth getting up at all. '
4 To some, however, rather than
a time for sleeping under trees,
the spring represents a time of
hard work. Among this group of
those who must toil rather than
loaf through the pleasant months
preceding summer are the mem-
bers of last year's Big Ten co-
*champion football squad.
To them the spring is a time
to get ready for the fall; a time
Pontiac Central, the number
one rated high school team in
Michigan, will meet Detroit
Public, School League cham-
pion Detroit Kettering in a
state quarterfinal game at 8
p.m. tonight at Crisler Arena.
Both teams boast A-State per-
formers, Central with Campy
Russell and Kettering with
Lindsey Hairston.
Another Ouarterfinal game
between Detroit Pershing and
Fordson, will be played at Cris,
ler at 4:30 p.m.
Tickets for both games will be
sold at the door.

practic
to put the old pieces back to-
gether and experiment with new
components. Or, as the team's of-
fensive coordinator Jim Young
puts it, "Spring practice is a
chance for new players to make
the squad and for lest year's re-
serves to move up."
According to Young, spring
practice is designed to "lay a
solid foundation for fall, not to get
the team ready for a season."
"We'll use the spring to experi-
ment to find the best line-up of-
fensively and defensively. We have
to find places for the new players
coming up from the freshman
team, to find out where each is
best.
"We also have to work on team
attitude," Young continues. "We'll
have new faces and we have to
work together as a unit."
In addition to forging a cohesive
unit from eighth different bodies,
work must be done to get those
eighty bodies ready to be part of
the cohesive unit.
"We will of course work on
basic techniques during spring
practice," Young added. "Much of
football is learned through repeti-
tion and it's Important to get
started."
While Young achnowledges that
spring practice is important for
the coaching staff as well as the
players he feels that it is more
for the squad. "Strategy is n o t
that important in spring practice,"I
he stresses, "and while we try new
ideas both " offensively and defen-

e opens
daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
AL SHACKELFORD
sively the, main emphasis is on
evaluating players."
Player evaluation is a doubly
important aspect of practice this
year as feet to fill some r a t h e r
large shoes will have to be found.
In addition to replacing fullback
Garvie Craw in the backfield, the
coaching staff will have to find a
backup quarterback to replace Jim
Betts, who /may move to the de-
fensive backfield.
Replacements other than Betts
are also needed in the secondary as
all three of last years starters were
seniors. There are also holes which
need plugging in both lines due to
graduation of such notables as
Bob Baumgartner and Dick Cald-
arazzo.
Another question which will be
answered during spring practice is
how well will coach Bo Schem-
bechler be able to limit his activi-
ties. As practice opened yesterday
afternoon Bo watched from a chair
on the sidelines rather than his
usual position in the middle of the
action. As the practice progressed
Bo moved around, but managed to
stay in his chair most of'the time.

for

gridders

LSU staves off Oklahoma;
Marquette crushes Utah in NIT

NEW YORK (P) - Louisiana
State, with Pete Maravich still
not at his best, barely held off
lightly-regarded Oklahoma 97-94
last night and advanced to the
semifinals of the National Invi-
tation Basketball tournament.
The Tigers will be matched in
Thursday's semis against the Mar-
quette Warriors.
Although scoring only 37 points
-well below his 46.6 average--
Pistol Pete missed three free
throws down the stretch when
Oklahoma cut an 81-64 deficit to
94-92 with 49 seconds remaining.
However, just as he did Sunday
against Georgetown when he sank
two decisive free throws with nine
seconds left in a lack-luster 20-
point performance, Maravich con-
nected twice on a 1-and-1 with 29
seconds to go for a 96-92 lead
against the Sooners.
He was fouled after dribbling
away some 20 seconds with a ball-
handling act that had the ca-
pacity Madison Square Garden
crowd of 19,500 roaring.
LSU, 22-8 after beating George-
town 83-82 in the first round Sun-
day, led from midway in the first

half as Oklahoma spent most of
its time chasing Maravich in al
switching man-to-man defense.
The Tigers took a 40-30 lead and
held a 44-38 spread at the half as
Maravich scored 18 points, al-
though hitting only six of 16 field
shots.
The Marquette Warriors, living
up to their role as tournament
favorite, put a defensive clamp
on high-scoring Utah and buried
the Redskins 83-63 last night to
gain the semifinals of the NIT.
Marquette, 23-3, ranked eighth
in the country in the final Asso-
ciated Press poll, scored the first
six points and then breezed in be-

hind 6-foot, guard Dean Memin-
ger's 28 points.
Utah, baffled by the quickness
and pressing defense of the na-
tion's 10th best defensive team,
managed to get within two several
times in the first half. But three
points by Meminger and four by
Gary Brell made it 28-18, and
Utah never got any closer.
Meminger, with a 18.6 average,
had 16 by halftime, which ended
with Marquette leading 45-33 en
route to its 10th straight victory
and semis in four NIT appear-
ances.
Brell totaled 19 points and Jeff
Sewell 16.

w

.
::

SAMUEL BECKETT'S
EN ATTENDANT.
GODOT.
IN FRENCH
Tuesday, Wednesday, March 17 & 18---8:00 P.M.
Trueblood Theatre--Tickets $2.00, $1.50
Box Office Open Mon. 1-4 P.M., Tues., Wed. 1-8 P.M.

-Daily-Sara Krulwich
A contented Bo Schem becher

t e Ceme
tta
Bill Cusumano_
Laughing towards
the championship
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND - Taking a ride with Johnny
Orr, Fred Snowden and George Pomey is truly a unique
experience. I found out yesterday as the four of us drove here
to view the NCAA finals being held at Maryland's old fieldhouse
this weekend.
The three are, to say the least, irrepressible. We left Orr%
house at 7:30 a.m. and the jokes and ,stories hadn't stopped
when we reached Washington at 4:30. Orr has a backlog of
tales from previous tournaments and conventions and, if I felt
like it, I could ruin the reputations of a few coaches by repeating
them. Of course, they could also destroy what little reputation
I have, so I won't.
The three coaches are tremendously entertaining people,
though, and they could make any trip an easy one. But
joking and entertaining is not their business, even though
it enters in at times. Their business is basketball and they
concentrate on it. As you listen to them you begin to realize
this.
The stories are always about basketball or basketball people
and the situations they get into. And the serious conversation is
also about the game. Interspersed with the fun or questions
I4 about recruits, future schedules, this year's team, next year's
team, what offense to use and what defenses. One begins to
realize that Orr, Snowden and Pomey are actually deceivers in
that their job is always uppermost in their minds.
They want to take Michigan to the top of college basketball;
they want to be flying their team to Washington to play in the
NCAA finals instead of driving to Washington. The champion-
ship is their goal and they are working methodically toward it.
I started at Michigan with the coaches and have watched
them progress. They began by making Michigan an exciting
running team and then made games more attractive by sched-
uling the toughest opponents in the country. Now they are work-
ing on getting a team that can combat that schedule.
Henry Wilmore, John Lockard, Ernie Johnson and Leon
Roberts are four strong freshmen this year, and 6-10 Ken
Brady will be eligible next year. Illinois coach Harv Schmidt
called this the best freshmen team he had seen all year.
You can bet there will be more top recruits and posibly some
top junior college players.
Athletes like that don't grow on trees though; they have to
be found. So Orr, Snowden, Pomey, and Dick Honig beat the
bushes. Rarely do I go into -the office when one is either not
writing a recruit, talking to him on the phone, or getting ready
to go out to play.
There is enormous work involved in recruiting and the Wol-
verine mentors have sweated to get players. Contacts must be
made, the athlete must be watched, his grades checked. And
then of course, he must be talked to and convinced that Mich-
igan is the best school.
Here is where the coaches natural effervesance enters. As
I found out yesterday, they can talk anyone into anything. They
are not hard to like, not because they fool you, but because they
are naturally likeable, and if they like you they show it. They
are fun to be with because they are having fun themselves; but
at the same time they never forget their job. However, they make
the work enjoyable for all concerned and that's why Michigan
made be the loosest team in NCAA tournament in a couple of
years.
I know one thing for sure, that is it will also be the least
publicized team. The reporter will be having too good a
time with Orr, Snowden, and Pomey to \bother working. I
know if I keep hanging around them for the next three
days the Daily may never find out who won the 1970 basket-
ball championship. I'll be too busy learning how Michigan
is going to win the title in 1972.

AAU, NCAA, NAIA:
Talks initiated on wrestling

HEAR CANDIDATES FOR SGC

* All 3 Presidential Candidates

By PATRICIA ATKINS
Executive Sports Editor
The United States Wrestling
Federation and the Amateur Ath-
letic Union (AAU) have begun
serious negotiations in an attempt
to agree on their relative spheres
of contribution to amateur wres-
tling, the Daily learned yesterday.
"Both organizations are making
a valid attempt to resolve wres-
tling problems in the United
States between the AAU and the
Wrestling Federation," the United
States International Wrestling
Representative,. Joe Scalzo, said
yesterday afternoon.
The U.S. Wrestling Federation
includes the NCAA, NAIA, junior
colleges, and high schools, and has
influence in colleges and high
schools; the AAU is oriented more
to open competition; that is, com-
petition taking place outside an
athlete's organization.
Publicity relations director for
In junction
Against Seattle
Stymies A.L.
TAMPA, Fla., M) - American
League owners told attorneys yes-
terday to "proceed with all pos-
sible speed" in getting lifted the
legal restraints barring a move of
the financially-troubled Seattle
baseball franchise.
Representatives of a Milwaukee
group seeking the year-old fran-
chise were waiting in the wings
here as owners met for seven
hours with league president Joe
Cronin.
A surprise temporary injunction
issued by a Florida judge upset
league plans. Owners faced the
threat of a jail sentence for con-
tempt of court if they ignored the
injunction and went ahead with
plans to shift the team to Milwau-
kee.
"But for that restraint, the
American League would have given
consideration for a transfer at'this
meeting," said Alexander Hadden
of Cleveland, the AL attorney. He
read a lengthy handwritten state-
ment to newsmen at the conclu-
sion of the closed-door meeting.

I I

This Weekend in Sports
SATURDAY
RUGBY-at Windsor
LACROSSE-at Oberlin

I

MARTY SCOTT
BRUCE WILSON
SUE GOLDENSON'

SUNDAY
RUGBY-Penn State on Ferry Field, 1:30 p.m.

* Candidates for Member-at-Large
MON., 7:00-UNION ASSEMBLY HALL

the NAIA, Mike Kleinman, said
last Friday that "something was
done on it (the wrestling negotia-
tions)" before. "But with all the
basketball tournaments going on,
wrestling has been shoved aside
for the moment," he explained. "I
don't know much about it, and
our wrestling representative is out
of town working on the basketball
tournaments."
A similar situation existed in the
NCAA national office.
"The parties are sitting down
for discussions," Scalze stated,
"but it's still in the maybe stage.
Until the parties agree, you have
nothing. If you have $10 and I
have $20, but we don't put it to-
gether, it does no good to sit down
and talk about what we're going
to do with our $30."

STI LLS,
NASH
and YOUNG
"DeJ a-yu
New Album
SPECIAL
$2.98
HI-Fl BUYS
Ann Arbor-East Lansing
618 S. Main 769-4700

i

C
in)
Te
(M
fro
ten
pro
wo
in
cus
fer(
the

One of the discussions took place
Ann Arbor the day after the Big
U Wrestling Championships
ar. 8), with representatives
m both organizations in at-
adence.
We're trying to resolve our
oblems," Scalzo concluded. "It
iuld be best not to argue the case
the news media, when the dis-
sion should be among the dif-
ent groups. It might jeopardize
results."
0 The Michigan Daily

Student Government Council
University Activities Center
Stcdents for Effective Action

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Scores

NHL
Detroit 3, Los Angeles 2
Exhibition Baseball
Kansas City 12, Detroit 4
New York NL 6, Chicago AL 5
Cincinnati 4, Philaelphia 2
Los Angeles 5, Pittsburgh 0
Minnesota 5,, St. Louis 2
New York AL 9, Boston 8
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New York 122, Detroit 106.
ABA
Kentucky 119, Denver 110

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