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March 18, 1970 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-18

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 1$, 1970

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, March 18, 1970

UNIVERSITY:
On creating a new institution

(Continued from Page 4)
in preparing experts in interna-
tional conflict; with enriching the
quality of our culture, not in con-
tributing to its corruption; with
enhancing the beauty of the nat-
ural world, not in desecrating it.
New fields like ecology, Afro-
American studies, and urban stud-
ies that are from the outset so-
cially-conscious will continue to
be initiated, while the more tra-
ditional fields like law, engineer-
ing,. medicine and social. studies
w ill accelerate their already
marked reorientation toward so-
cial concern.
IT IS ALSO LIKELY that the
content of social "science" and
the humanities will be freed from
the spell of pseudo-science and
incorporate once again explicit
value judgment. It will become in-
creasingly obvious that an uncon-
scionably large amount (though
by no means all) of the models,
methods and data processing is
sham and self-deception.
In its early positivist days, be-
haviorism reflected the admirable
conviction that social laws could
be disclosed and t h a t through
them social scientists could in-
fluence society for human benefit
as the natural scientists did in
their realm. There are no doubt
some who continue to believe this,
and many more would certainly
find this act of faith as an im-
plicit self-justification underlying
their social research.
But it is hardly a secret that
many elaborate projects in the
social sciences are undertaken to
advance the "state of the art," to
satisfy the researchers' aesthetic
and play instincts, or simply to
demonstrate sophisticated skills to
one's colleagues and professional
leaders, particularly those in
charge of promotions and grants.
Rather than bring students in so-
ciology and political science clos-
er to social ills (much less to any
reasonable program for their
amelioration) the impressive ar-
r a y of tapes, cards, print-outs,
graphs and tables too often raises
an impenetrable wall protecting
the young researcher from t h e
shock of social truth.
EVER MORE AWARE that
what is politically and humanely
significant can seldom be quant-
ified (and well tutored in t h e
Vietnam example of policy by
computer), the new students in
social studies urge direct encount-
er, face to face, I-thou rapport
with those they are studying, ful-

ly aware that interpretations ofI
such encounters can only be high-c
ly subjective. Even economistsi
and engineers are being challeng-
ed by those who insist that these1
fields concern themselves w i t h
alternative ends, not only withi
the most rational, or least costly
means, with the "why" of an is-1
sue ,not only the "how." The high-
est market bid and the lowest ma-1
terial cost are no longer deemed
adequate determinants of a pol-
icy or -design. Qualitative social1
losses and gains, those disturbing
"externalities," must be taken]
heavily into account.I
Understandably, this return to1
subjectivism, to intuitive sensi-
tivity, is even more likely in the
humanities, where, too, the fetish{
of numbers has had immense suc-4
cess. Since the humanities were,
long the traditional home of crit-
icism and value judgment, their
displacement by "hard data" ex-
ercises should be chalked off as a,
major, triumph for the mechani-
zation of thought. But, it seems,
both students and faculty are re-'
calling what was said in those'
"statements of purpose" which
hopeful applicants prepared for'
the graduate schools, the "corny"'
"sophomoric" lines about the na-
ture and destiny of man, the dra-
ma of humanity and so forth.
There is a good chance that these
sentiments may yet prevail over
anxious professionalism, t h a t
philosophy, history and .literature
may again become majistra vitae,
teacher of life.
BESIDES. PREPARING the new
student for humane service, the
content of education will also seek
to enrich the lives of the students
themselves. Paradoxical though - it
might seem, the move to rele-
vance in education will be accom
panried by a renewed appreciation
of our cultural heritage.
From the courses that the new
students have initiated, both in
their "free universities" and, more
recently, in "credit" courses, it is
clear that they aspire to humane
self-fulfillment as well as humane
service, that they take very ser-'
iously t h e humanist ideal of a
many-sided personality and arf
eager to take advantage of the
possibilities that affluence a n d
leisure provide f o r this enrich-
ment.
Moreover, contrary to the argu-
ment of those who denounce the
emphasis on relevance, the two
interests - self and service - are
symbiotically joined: great liter.
ature, philosophy, history and art
comprise the richest source of the

very ideals that relevant, socially-
conscious action attempts to real-
ize. The present education, in
sharp contrast, is concerned with
neither the student's cultural
growth nor with humane service:
it is given over almost entirely to
the range in between, the func-
tional skills by which economized
theory becomes economized prac-
tice.
RATHER THAN SHARE with
their students the experience of
g r e a t works, professors in the,
humanities train memory and an-
alytic skills. Instead of joining in
a cooperative encounter with cre-
ative genius, faculty and students
are immersed in survey texts,
summary outlines, and successive
criticisms a n d interpretations,
ending with the professor's own
"contribution" to this endless re-
arrangement of "concepts and da-
ta.
But this, again, is as it should
be in a system that wants only
able technicians, functionaries
dedicated to absurd or destructive
enterprises a n d psychologically
unable to do very much of value
either for themselves or for any-
one else.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Bach Club meeting Wed., Mar. 18 at
8:00. 1236 Wash. (corner of SU at
Forest). Program: "Bach vs. Marcello
Elegance vs. charm". Featuring live
perf. (Catherine McKelvey, flute; Cor-
nelia Schorr, piano) of Bach's Sonata in
E minor & Marcellos Sonata in F Ma-
jor. Miss McKelvey will conduct the pro-
gram.
The Ageless Science of Yoga. Asana
and Posture class sponsored by the Self
Realization Fellowship, Mon. or Wed.,
8-9:00 p.m., call Lin1]a or Dale, 761-
9825 after 6:00 p.m.
** * *
University Lutheran Chapel: March
18, 10:00 p.m., 1511 Washtenaw, Mid-
week Lenten Vespers, The Rev. Rich-
ard Kapfer.
University of Michigan Flyers: Fed-
eral Aviation regulations for pilots. Mr.
Verdon W. Kleimehnagen, FAA accident
prevention specialist, Thursday, March
19, 1970, 8:00 p.m. Multipurpose, UGLI.
Rent your,
Roommate with
a Classified Ad

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 6)
The annual Convocation recognizing un-
dergraduate honor students will be held
at 10:30 a.m., Fri., Mar. 20, at Hill
Auditorium. Dr. William N. Hubbard,
Jr~ Dean of the Medical School and
Director of the Medical Center and fu-
ture Vice-President and General Man-
ager of th Pharmaceutical Division of
the Upjohn Company, will address the
Convocation on "Compassion and Com-
petence."
All undergraduate classes, with the
exception of clinics and graduate sem-
inars, will be dismissed from 9:45 to
12:00 noon for the Convocation. How-
ever, seniors may be excused from clin-
ics and seminars.
The honor students will not wear caps
and gowns. Main floor seats will be
reserved for them and for members of
their families and will be held until
10:15. Doors of the Auditorium will open
at 10:00. The public is invited.
The Henry Russel Lecture will be de-
livered by John Arthos, Prof. of Eng-
lish, Wei., Mar. 18, 8:00 p.m., Rack-
ham Amph. His lecture topic is "Shake-
speare and the Ancient World." The
Henry Russel Award will also be made
at this time.
SGC MINUTES
Approved:
WHEREAS: The U.S. government (i.e.
the military-industrial complex) en-
gages in a policy of oppressing peoples
around the world in forms of genocidal
wars, suppression of popular reform
and revolutionary movements, a n d
employment of people as slave labor;
WHEREAS: The University of Mich'-
igan supports this denial of a human's
right to life by allowing recruiters on
campus from companies that employ
the U.S. government's genocidal poli-
cies.
WHEREAS: A human's right to life is
certainly more important than the right
of engineering or any student's right
to be interviewed by anyone they
choose.
BE IT RESOLVED: That SGC take a
firm and unyielding position against
the government's imperialistic policy,
against university complicity with the
,war effort, and against university re-
cruitment policy.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That
SGC demands that recruitment by
corporations that aid the war effort
and/or are exploitative at home or
abroad be stopped. That if the Uni-
versity does not immediately halt re-

cruitment, then SGC support any at-
tempts short of physical violence to
persons by any groups to prevent these
warmongering companies from recruit-
ing on campus. Specifically, SGC urges
students to take immediate action
against Atlantic-Richfield at n o o n
tomorrow.
That SGC set up a committee which
will establish guidelines for acceptabil-
ity of corporations for the privilege of
recruiting.
Roll Call Vote:
YES: Brand, DeGrieck, Gorman,
Lewis, Martin, Nelson, Scott, Van Der
Rout. NO: Anderson, Warrington.
Approved:
MOVE: That SGC condemns the ad-
ministration and Fleming for their
crude attempts to subvert the BAM
demands;
MOVE: That SGC vigorously supports
the BAM demands (especially for 10
per cent black enrollment by Fall 1973
with adequate financial aid);
FURTHER MOVE: That SGC urges
the Regents to pass the BAM demands
in their entirety next week and urges
students to actively show their support
by attending the Regent's meetings and
expressing their feelings in a way which
cannot be ignored.
Approved:
WHEREAS: The Dean and the Execu-
tive Committee of the LS&A School in
a highhanded and arbitrary fashion at-
tempted to suspend a student, Bob
Parsons, without due process;
WHEREAS: This attempt was thwart-
ed by mass action by the student body;
BE IT RESOLVED: That as long as
students are exercising a de facto pow-
er in academic discipline, the situation
should be institutionalized;
FURTHER RESOLVED: That SG C
transmit to the faculty of the College
of LS&A and of the other colleges a
proposal that all codes of academic
conduct be written by committees with
party voting membership of students
and faculty, with the resulting code to
be approved by the whole faculty and
the whole student bodyin each college
in the manner they see fit:
FURTHER RESOLVED: That col-
lege faculty agree that no student will
be disciplined for personal nonacademic
conduct under any faculty code.
Approved:
WHEREAS: SGC moved that t h e
"fact" sheet distributed in mass quan-
tities by robben and friends wasbiased
and evaded the entire issue of cor-
porate recruiting;
WHEREAS: SGC demanded the rob-
ben distribute the truth (as SGC sees
it) at his expense;
WHEREAS: robben said with a smile
on his face, "I believe in equal time.
But, you have a budget - use it."
E IT RESOLVED: That SGC con-
demns robben phieming for his un-
fair and biased treatment of the issue
and his blatant repression of the truth
on campus;
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED : That

SGC condemns robben for using his
office of the presidency to propagan-
dize for and to further the doubtful
cause of the warmongering corporate
elite.
Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Further information at Career Plan-
ning 3200 SAB, 764-6338.
Council on International Educational
Exchange, listings of programs for
study, travel and work abroad.
Rehabilitation Counseling Employ-
ment Exchange, jobs in rehab. services
booklet.
City Planning Dept., San Antonio,
Texas, full time employ plus masters
in urban planning.
St. Cloud State College, Minn., grad.
assistantships in student personnel
services.
State Univ. of New York at Bingharn
ton, programs in biol., Engl., geol.,
math, music, psych, soc, sci., and Span-
ish leading to MAT and] MST.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAB, Lower Level
Interviews at Summer Placement:
MARCH 18:
Good Humor, Det. men and women
drivers of ice cream truck, nationwide,
good pay.
MARCH 19:
Classic Crafts Corp, summer college
prog., company reps. car nec.
MARCH 20:
Kelly Services, register for typing, file
clerk, bus. mach. oper., computer,
switchboard, gen. office wk.
Camp Michigania, U of M Family
Camp, men for archery, riding,Fboat-
ing, swimming (WSI), riflery.
ANNOUNCEMENT:
City of Elmhurst seeks students for
Summer Forestry Program. Good salary.

University Coopertive
REDUCED PRICES
PARTIAL LISTING OF SERVICES
Save 2-3c gal, on gasoline
Save money on appliances
Save 10% on haircuts
JO0"IN THE COO00P
COOP OFFICE, Basement, Michigan Union, 761-2808
STUDENT CREDIT UNION, 1 st Floor, Michigan Union
EMPLOYEE'S CREDIT UNION, 508 E. William
The University Cooperative is non-profit, consumer
service organization, owned and controlled by its
members
University UCCooperative

V

k

The Senior Staff of the 1971 MICH IGANENSIAN
extends applications to any student member of
the University Community for a position on the
Junior Staff.

N I

TIHE POSITIONS ARE:
Academics Editor
Associate Academics
Arts Editor
Associate Arts
Campus Life Editor
Associate Campus Life
Organizations Editor
Associate Organizations

DAVE'S CORVETTE & CUSTOM SHOP
Expert Autobody Repair - Speed Parts Sold
All Makes and Models - Specialize in Fiberglas
310 N. River
YPSILANTI - 483-3441

Senior Section Editor
Sports Editor
Associate Sports
Publicity Director
Sales Manager
Associate Sales
Copy Editdr
Design Editor,

Applications may be obtained at the MICHIGANENSIAN Office
or the Student Publications Business Office, 420 Maynard St.
APPLICATIONS ARE DUE MARCH 20, 1970

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