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March 15, 1970 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-15

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

5undav. March 15, 1970

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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By JOE PEHRSON
The last concert of the Con-
temporary Direstions series was
performed last night in Rack-
ham Aud. Unlike many con-
certs which may be described in
some area of grey, this was a
concert of extremes - either
the works contained a tremend-
ous amount of musical content,
which was displayed through
careful performance, or held
practically no -content at all.
Three pieces fall into the first
category,. one, of. which is For
Grilly by Franco Donatoni. This
ensemble work showed amazing
contrast, and made full use of all
spacial or "stereo" possibilities.
The instruments were divided
into essentially two groups -
wind instruments on one side of

the stage and string instruments
on the other. This was made
evenmore interesting by place-
ment of percussion: directly be-
tween the two types of sound.
This placement, of course, must
serve a function, and the func-
tion was made quite clear. The
two sound groups were in con-
stant conflict, each attempt-
ing to interrupt the other. The
movement, then, was horizontal,
and the ear was directed in a
linear fashion to each side of
the ensemble. Depth was added,
though, by the percussion. The
linear progression took on a
three-dimensional effect as the
locus, the exact meeting place
of the two competing sounds,
was punctuated by percussion.
The placement of this percus-

sion, in center stage, shows the
composer's constant awareness
of structure-the origin of the
sounds, and the way the sounds
combined in space, was as much
a part of the structure as the
chosen pitches. This is an ex-
tremely successful work, and the
excellent performance by mem-
bers of the Contemporary Di-
rections Ensemble insured its
success.
Another piece which had some-
thing to say, and said it well
was Pianopiece No. 11: Inform-
ed Sources by George Cacioppo.
As ingenious as the title, this
piece allowed a listener to fa-
miliarize himself with a type
or range of sound-the range,
which became more of a tex-
ture, was predetermined by the

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composer. Each range was fol-
lowed by another, and usually in
different order. The ranges,
however, were numbered - and
the types of sound became famil-
iar through repetition; the
listener could easily grasp fami-
liar material. There was always
variation, however: duration and
dynamics were left to the per-
formers, and the sounds of the
piano were altered through a
four speaker arrangement. The
sounds could constantly s h i f t
through the auditorium, and
this decision, the choice of
speakers or sources, was made
by other performers.
This piece, then, always con-
tained something new, and yet,
there were elements which were
appealingly familiar. William
Albright and Kurt Carpenter
combined their multiple talents
to offer this piano rendition.
The electronic performers,
who "informed" or chose t h e
sources, were equally capable.
Contra Mortem et Tempus by
George Rochberg and Five
Studies for Tuba Alone by David
Reck may be passed over brief-
ly. The former piece contained
nothing new, save for an inter-
esting combination of violin and
bell sound near the conclusion.
This eclectic combination of ele-
ments from other compositions
served no purpose, and was ex-
tremely dull. Although Five Stu-
dies for Tuba Alone was per-
formed well by Mark Evans, it
had a strange, but rather super-
ficial type of humor. Emphasiz-
ing the more unappealing tuba

sounds, this piece has the charm
of a bullfrog held in hand..
Perhaps this is amusing.
Over the Pavements by Char-
les Ives was complete with Ives
playful humor, This humor,
however, was by no means trite:
the message and the musical
structure are dependent upon it,
and everything works extremely
well. There were some prob-
lems in performance, including
an over-dominant piano, but this
did not hamper the excitement.
John Cage, as usual, should
be considered separate from
everything else. Imaginary Land-'
scape No. 4, a piece for 12
radios and 24 performers (the
"Bisentenial" Players), w a s
another Cage extraveganza into
the realms of chance and elec-
tronic-oriental philosophy. Even
snatches of Blood, Sweat a n d
Tears made part of the sound
fabric, and of course we heard
something of ecology. Each
radio was adjusted according to
a score, and while volume and
channel selection was pre-deter-
mined, Cage's two-faced coin
made the program decisions.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

I

'I-Il

Announcing our March Schedule
All films in Aud. A, Angell Hall
75c

March 12, 13, 14-Thurs., Fri., Sat.
BONNIE AND CLYDE 7 & 9:3
starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway
directed by Arthur Penn.
March 20, 21-Fri., tat.
DR. STRANGELOVE 7 & 9:3
starring Peter Sellers, George C. Scott
directed by Stanley Kubrick
March 22-Sun.

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375 No. MAPLE RD. .769-13OO
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Mon.-Tues.--7:00, 9:00
Sat-Sun.-1 :30, 3:20
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film festival -
Festival shows major works

GUNGA DIN
starring Cary Grant, Douglas
and Sam Jaffe as Gunga Din
March 27, 28-Fri., Sat.
BEDAZZLED

7 & 9:30 P.M.
Fairbanks, Jr.,

7 & 9:30 P.M.

4

starring Dudley Moore, Raquel Welch=
Sin and satire in English style

By BRUCE HENSTELL
Saturday night's p r o g r a in
brought the regular screenings
at the Ann Arbor Film Festival
to a close. Now the jury has the
unenviable task of finding
enough eye-sight after having
viewedn 40hours of film to read
their" notes -and then make a
decision.
In any year the routine of
giving "prizes, is difficult. It
would be hard to imagine it
anything but exceedingly dif-
ficult this year. Saturday was
just the topper. It has been a
brilliant' festival.
Morley Markson's film The
Tragic Diary of Zero the Fool
stands out. -It will have a second
viewing o doubt. It is a major
film.-The film is an exciting in-
vestigation of' narrative, util-
izing some gifted actors. Gerald
Cogan, playing the fool, literally
half hams and half balls his
way through this investigation
of the relationship of three in-
dividuals. He is outstanding. His
role is that of fool, as he says
at the beginning "I'm a fool,
somebody just told me that."
Around him spin Penelope, in
search of some moving, magical
force, and Daniel who is utterly
pragmatic in a search to be
neutral.
The film owes much to God-
ard, as almost . everyone does,
in its interviews and plays with
the camera. To convince us that
the self-conscious exploration of
the motives of a character has
validity, Markson has his actor

stare at two cars whose presence
we are only aware of through
sound and eye-motion. We are
indeed reading along with the
film, presenting ourself for
manipulation by the actors and
the camera.
The film has much of a the
appearance of Manupelli's Chi-
cago series. Not a matter of in-
fluence so much as indicative of
an exciting trend: close, intro-
spective, intensive discussion be-
tween cast and director, alter-
natively "writing" a film and
"making" it. We are moving to-
ward a form of repertorie cine-
ma and Markson, with this
film, puts himself in the front
ranks.
.Tappy Toes by Red Grooms,
while overly lengthy, is another
sure winner. It is a play upon
the rhetoric of the Hollywood
dance spectacular with the
frightened unknowns huddled
in front of the spots. The re-
mainder of the film, part ani-
mation, part live action -- and
better at blending both than
Walt Disney - is the standard
dance number. The sets utilized
a scale-construction of the city
of Chicago and could hardly
have played better upon the
very different cultural memories
of Chicago a la "what a toddlin'
town" and that of the Chicago
of Mayor Daly.
Scott Bartlett's film On-Off
won here a year ago and had
many screenings following the
festival. Moon 1969 is another
experiment with color technique,

imposition etc. and while visual-
ly beautiful one may rightly
wonder where Bartlett wants us
to go.
College Daze by Andrew and
Robert Halper and Tom Berman
shows a technical mastery of the
medium and a good sense of
humor, if familiar story-line. It
concerns the Wandering Jew of
our day, the college freshman.
His experiences in a crack-pot
psychology test are explored,
including getting laid by a ran-
dom subject with whom he is C
"To Relate." There is a sub-story
but it is never clear why.
Pop, by Low, Vaughn, and
Whitney is composed of shots
of the deflation of an environ-
mental structure. It laughs at
itself, the art, and its audience
and was throughly enjoyable. A
special word is due to the sculp-
tor, Doug Hollis.
Tomorrow night the winners
and highlights. What a show
that will be.

March 29-Sun.
REBECCA

matinee-] & 3 P.M.

starring Sir Laurence Olivier
directed by Alfred Hitchcock
In April: PETULIA, ROBIN HOOD, SALESMAN, FACES, LA
GUERRE EST FINIE
Watch the Daily for announcements of dates and times

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MARCH 18-24-8 p.m.
Schorling Aud., University School
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All Speakers of English as a Second Language* Are
Invited to Take Part in an Experimental Test of Eng-
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TORIUM A, ANGELL HALL AT 7:15 P.M. ON THE
19th OF MARCH. You Will Receive $5.00 for Ap-
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