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March 15, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I'

RACHEL URIST
Israeli Dance I nstructress
will lead
ISRAEL I FOLK DANCING
SUNDAY, MARCH 15 at 6:15
following DELI HOUSE
at TH E HOUSE
1429 HILL ST.
SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:00-5:00
Tt tr 7:00&9:10 P.M
NOMI NATED FOR 9 ACADEMY AWARDS
"BEST
j } PPICTRE
OF THE YEAR"
-Notionol Boar4
of Revicew
"BEST
ACTRESS-
JANE FONDAJ"
---New York Film Critics
* ASUBSIDIARY OF THlE AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANIES. INC.
DISTRIBUTED BY CINERAMA RELEASING CORPORATION
You can't recommend"
the best lodging
i nAnn Arbor.,.
until you've visited
the Campus Inn.

CRITICIZE IDATA:
Faculty hits report
on campus disorder

ale

tC i M1T

ai1y

page three

Sunday, March 1 5, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

Continued from Page 1)
University campus have indicated
this was the case with them.
When asked about biased ques-
tioning, Thomas Emmet Jr., the
president of Higher Education Ex-
ecutive Associates, did not deny
the charge.
"Some days you feel good and
the tone of your questioning is
good," he explained. "And some-
times it's not. We- may give the
impression of being biased, but' we
try to avoid that."
The problem' of assumption
about the topic being studied
seemed to emerge most in the sec-
tion based on, the on-campus in-
terviews. The report called on-
campus issues the factors which
"create a' climate within which a
campus eruption becomes either a
possibility or a probability."
But the report itself did not
show any casual relationship in
this area. Instead it simply set,
out the fact that students are
dissatisfied with what the state's
colleges and universities offer
today.
if you need child care
facilities or are interested
in working to establish
them--
COME TO A
MASS MEETING-
Sunday, March 15
2 00 P.M
St. Andrews Church
(provisions will be made to
care for children of those
attending)
- ,
3020 Washtenow, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
NOW SHOWING
Nominated for Seven
ACADEMY AWARDS
includinq
*fBest Picture 0 Best Sonq
7Dm hCENT!""
Pasx
BUTCH CASSCE AND
THE S UNDANCE K(D

This is simply descriptive,"
said Prof. William Cave of the
education school. "In no way does
it show causes and effects,"
"Most studies have found a
general malaise about going to
school," added Dr. Gamson. "Stu-
dents always feel that way, That
doesn't say anything about going
to student protests."
In addition, the experts find
the. report deficient on its most
basic level-the raw data collected
from the questionnaire. All of the
professors who read the report
found it difficult to discern any
meaning from the data because
they saw it as ambiguous,
The questionnaires used in the
study asked people to specify if
an item was a protest issue, and if
so, then how prolonged the issue
was and how much student and
faculty involvement there was.
"The chart derived from that
looks objective," Prof. Cave said,
"but who knows what 'protest'
is?",
"This is a fundamental prob-
lem," he added. "People can call
a wide range of events the same
things. 'Protest' can be anything
from simple displeasure to break-
ing windows and fighting."
Dr. Gamson agreed. "Soiething
that would be sneezed at at the
University would be hot stuff at
Albion College," she said The
questionnaire was not sensitive to
such distinctions.
Brown noted the same problem
and added another-the immedi-
ate analysis of the data. "These
are no more than casual co-
ments on what differences in the
data mean," he said, 'but that's
dangerous because they don't know
for sure that those differences
mean anything."
He was refering specifically to
data showing that college presi-
dents observed less protest on
campuses than faculty or students
did.
Yet Brown had some lavorable
remarks for the study as well. "I
won't defend this material on
scientific grounds, but the inter-
view sults have decent face
value," he said. "The quotes do
ring true from my experience."
But, he added, it is not social
science. "It is journalism, pure
and simple."
The people. who, prepared the
report gave two defenses against
the charges of deficiency - that
the report really is not so bad
and that it was meant to be the
way it is.
Emmet, head of the research
firm, denied charges that the dif-
ferent parts of the report did not
fit together logically. "Every rec-
ommendation is cross-woven; they
mesh very nicely," he said.
Added Dennis Bining, editorial
consultant for the study and an
editor at McGraw-Hill, "The peo-
ple who worked on this report
think its the best thing that has
even been done in this area and
nothing--bar none--nothing can
touch it."
But it wasn't perfect, he ad-
mitted. "As a statistical research-
er, I can tell you everything that
was wrong with this report. I
could write a book on it," he said.
"We did not write it' for socio-
logists-we did not research it for
sociologists," he said. "Let the
people decide- not the sociolo-
gists."

Black
movement
discussed
(Continued from Page 1)
"But rather than just an in-
terest group problem, the Black
Action Movement demands affect
the whole nature of higher educa-
tion," Singham concluded.
Continuing the conference with
a history of these black student
demands, Walter Lewis '70, said,
"The question still remains, 'Does
this University take the BAM de-
mands seriously?'"
BAM leaders have predicted ma-
jor student actions if the Regents
do not respond favorably to the
demands.
Harold Cruse, the final speaker,
specified the role of culture in
the black r'evolution. Cruse is a
lecturer in Afro-American studies
and is the author of "The Crisis of
the Negro Intellectual."
Cruse said "Black studies, black
revolution 'and black culture are
interchangeable terms." He then
called upon black students to meet
a "creative challenge-the "re-
interpretation of an experience
which has been interpreted in
faulty ways by previous his-
torians."
This is not a call for a sepa-
ration of black and white, accord-
ing to Cruse. "The black experi-
ence is meaningless if we don't see
black history in terms of its im-
pact on the broader society
around us," he said.
Cruse concluded that black stu-
dies will have a profound impact
as a means of seeing the kinds of
historical context from which a
black revolution may evolve.
"If this is not seen," Cruse said,
"the revolution will be a failure,
and what that means for blacks
in this society I shudder to think
or say."

the
n eWs tday
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
THE SOVIET UNION warned the U.S. yesterday that the
planned deployment of the U.S. MIRC missile system has threat-
ened arms limitation talks.
A sharply worded commentary in the Soviet Defense Ministry's
organ, Red Star, called the decision to put the MIRV into operation
a "stick in the spokes" of efforts to curb the arms race.
"The Pentagon's decision seriously threatens the Soviet-Amer-
ican talks and encourages the arms race," the Red Star commentary
said in the first Soviet reaction to the program.
U.S. Air Force Secretary Robert C. Seaman told the Senate Armed
Services Committee Tuesday the MIRV-multiple independently
targeted re-entry vehicle-would be installed in June, well ahead of
the original 1970 target date.
** * *
SENATE MAJORITY LEADER MIKE MANSFIELD said yes-
terday President Nixon does not plan to repeat use of bombers
in Laos.
The senator said that after the use of B52 bombers in last month's
unsuccessful effort to prevent the North Vietnamese recapture of
the Plain of Jars he asked that the raids not be repeated.
He said, when interviewed, he has received "good enough as-
surance to suit me" that the strikes will not be repeated. He did not
say who gave him the assurance, though he did say "the President
feels the same way" as Senate critics about the need to avoid further
involvement in Laos.-
A FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION report shows
the two friends of H. Rap Brown were killed by an accidental
detonation of explosives they had in the car.
The report cited evidence involving the position of the passengers,
explosives, and car when the blast occurred, which officials say
shows the explosives were neither thrown at the car or planted.
The explosion, which occurred near Bel Air Monday night, killed
William Payne, a civil rights worker from Atlanta, Ga., and. Ralph
Featherstone, former program director of the Student Non-violent
Coordinating Committee.
. * * *
THE NEW MOBILIZATION COMMITTEE'S call for an anti-
draft week March 16-22 has been answered by plans for demon-
strations in over'100 cities.
' Those demonstrating plan to focus on "non-violent, orderly civil
disobedience." Plans include leafletting, picketing, and sit-ins at draft
offices and induction centers, and flooding the offices with phone
calls in an effort to impede their work.

Panel held
onwar and,

ecology

By HANNAH MORRISON
The effects of war upon the
environments of Vietnam and the
United States were explored at a
panel on "War and the Environ-
ment" yesterday afternoon.
The discussion, cosponsored by
ENACT and New Mobe, featured
University professors Anatol Ra-
poport and Irwin Goldstein, Prof.
Kenneth Boulding of the econo-
mics department at the University
of Colorado, and Douglas Fulton,
outdoor editor of the Ann Arbor
News.
David Gordon, co-chairman of
New Mobe, acted as moderator.
Stressing the need for govern-
mental reform to end the forms
of pollution caused by war, Bould-
ing said, "There must be a change
in the national super-power image.
We have this mantle-of-Elijah
complex." He suggested a smaller
war industry as part of the solu-
tion.
The economist blamed the inter-
national, system of deterrence as
the fundamental problem, how-
ever.
Boulding also suggested two
ways to reform the system: mak-
ing a better world government
structure-a prospect he deemed
"highly unlikely"-and reassess-
ment of national goals.
"We should become the modest
society which stays home and
minds its own business rather than
the 'Great Society'," he said.
Goldstein, a biological chemist
said, "The U.S. has exported pol-
lution by systematically destroy-
ing Vietnam. We are converting
a once beautiful country into a
chemical wasteland. It's immoral."
Fulton blamed high costs for.
the lack of programs to clean up
the environment. "We can no
longer afford the luxury of war,
for we don't have enough re-
sources," he said. "There must be
a whole new way of life."
Rapoport, a mathematic bio-
logist, defined pollution as an "ex-
cess of waste spewed out by man's
technology."
"The reason everyone likes talk-
ing about the evils of pollution is
because they all agree on it," be
said. "It alo keeps people's minds
on the government's sins of omis-
sion rather than their sins of com-
mission - to the government's
satisfaction."
Rapoport also said the semantic
environment needs changing just
as much as the biological and
physical surroundings.
"It is much harder to clean up
the semantic environment - the
poison secreted in conventional
wisdom-than the others. It legit-
imizes war as an instrument of
foreign policy and convinces that
killing and making paupers con-
stitutes defense of freedom," he
said.

C PUS
ANN ARBOR'S
FINEST MOTOR HOTEL

Daily Official Bulletin
SUNDAY, MARCH 15
Day Calendar
Dance Series: Royal Winnipeg Bal-
let: Hill Auditorium, 2:30 p.m.
Sigma Alpha Iota American Musicale:
School of Music Recital Hall, 2:30 p.m.
Degree Recital: Jane Smithson, piano:
School of Music Recital Hall, 4:30 p.m.
International Center Film Series:
The Heritage of Slavery: International
Center, 7:30 p.m.
Degree )Recital - Ginger Reynolds,
piano: School of Music Recital Hall, 8:00
p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH 16
Senate Assembly Meeting: Report on
SACUA, campus planning, Rackham
Amphitheater, 3:15 p.m.
Department of Engineering Mechan-
ics Seminar: Professor M. J. Kaldjian,
Departments of Civil Engineering., En-
gineering Mechanics, and Naval Archi-
tecture and Marine Engineering, "Ofn
Finite Elemet Mthod ad Its Applica-
tions': 311 West Engineering, 4:00 p.m.
Physics Colloq.: B. Maglic, Rutgers,
"Recent and Planned Experiments on
Resonance Searches" P&A Colloq. Rm.,
4:00 p.m.
Classical Students & Speech and

Professional Theatre Prog.: Takis Mu-
zenidis, Dir., Nat'l Theatre of Greece,"
Problems of Modern Interpretation of
Ancient Drama," Rackham Amph., 4:10
p.m'.
School of Music Honors Assembly:
Wilbur J. Cohen, Dean, School of Edu-
cation, "New Directions in American
Education": Rackham Lecture Hall, 8:00
p n.
Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
The Henry Russel Lecture will be
delivered by John Arthos, Professor of
English, Wed., Mar. 18, 8:00 p.m., Rack-
ham Amph. His lecture topic is "Shake-
speare and the Anvient World." The
Henry Russel Award will also be made
at this time.
Late interview announcement, Mar,
18: Mattell, Inc., seeks BA any area
for mktg., merchandising & sales; Mat-
tell famous as "the toy people" and for
aggressive, mktg. programs."
Interviews ?t General Div., complete
info, published in bulletin, call 763-
1363 for appts.
Weeks of March 23 - April 3:
Boy Scouts of America

Computer Software Systems, Inc.
S. S. Kresge
Michigan Civil Service
Pan American Airways
U. S. Marine Corps
U. S. Navy e
U. S. Air Force
Allstate Insurance
Fidelity Mutual Life Ins.
Peace Corps week, March 30 - Apr. 3
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAB, Lower Level
Interviews at Summer Placement
Service:
MARCH 16:
Camp Cavell, YWCA, Det., wtrfrnt dir.
(min. 21), asst. dir., geh. couns. & arts
& craft.
MARCH 17:
Camp Tamarack, Fresh Air Soc., Det.
couns. spec., wtrfrnt, arts & crafts, na-
ture, campcraft, tripping, drama, dance,
unit and asst. unit supv, casewkr,
truck-bus driver, couns. for emotion-
ally disturbed (m), marionette theater,
kitchen porter; univ. credit avail,
MARCH 1S:
Good Humor, Det., men and women,
drive ice cream truck, good salary.
MARCH 20:
Kelly Services, Det., register for sum-
mer work in typing, file, bus. machine
,omputer wk., switchboard, gen. of-
fice.
- (Continued on Page 6)

I

615 East Huron Street at State Street - 769-2200

J

--ml - m Opp,

PANAVISIONS COLOR BY DELUXE
I Suogsed' For MATURE Audiences
+AI r.;as ''0'."o se

P

m

K

LAST 3 DAYS!!

ENDS TUESDAY!!

a

Student Council Election
at THE HOUSE
1429 HILL ST.
SUNDAY, MARCH 15
4:00 P.M.
ALL INVITED TO ATTEND

I

J

-

-

The brother
binds himself to
form community
For information about
these Brothers, write to:
Brother Robert Fillmore, C.S.C.
Notre Dame, Indiana 46556

I

8th ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL
MARCH 10-15
(in cooperation with CINEMA GUILD and DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER)
TONIGHT: SUNDAY-WINNERS AND HIGHLIGHTS
-i-e-riL r . %,/c.r%/-,.la nn

MICHIGRAS does Vaudeville

and we need:

I

specialty acts
I singers, dancers, comedians
Itrumpets, trombones, pianists, and drums

ROBERT REDFORD GELE HACKMANI CAM I LA SPARV / "DOWNHILL RACER

I

I

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