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March 11, 1970 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-11

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f

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 11, 1970

Distinguished Speaker Series
SUNDAY, MARCH 15-8:00 P.M.
Dr. Amos Per/muller
Prof. of History, Harvard Univ. Center for Inter-
national Studies. Author of Nation Building in
Israel-Roles of the Military and Civilian
will speak on
"Military and Civilian Sectors-
Policy Making in Israel"
TUESDAY, MARCH 17th
Richard Rubenstein
"Death of God" Theologian
Charles E. Merrill Lecturer in the Humanities at
the Univ. of Pittsburgh. Author of After Aus-
wiez wil.I discuss
"Israel: Radical Implications of
the End of Jew as Victim"
at THE HOUSE
1429 HILL ST,
United Jewish Student Appeal March 15-22

'M' trackmen

flounder

as Badgers retain title

By SANDI GENIS
Revenge is sweet, someone.once
said. Just ask Wisconsin's rookie
track coach Bob Brennan. Sat-
urday, Brennan and a crowd of
over two thousand, saw his power-
ful Badgers, who but a week ear-
lier had seen their Big Ten track
hopes dimmed as they were upset
in a dual meet by a surprisingly
powerful Indiana team, roll over
that same Hoosier squad, as well
as all the others in the confer-
ence, on the way to their second
straight Big Ten indoor crown.
DESPITE a number of key in-
juries, the Badgers, behind excel-
lent efforts by double winners
Mark Winzenreid and Greg John-
son, racked up 63 points to In-
diana's 48, placing in all but two
of the sixteen events.
Michigan's Wolverines, highly
touted at the start of the season,
and fresh from a hard-won victory
over Michigan State, turned in a
disappointing performance. The
Wolverines scored only 21 points,
to place a poor fifth in the con-

ference and failed to take a first
place in any event.
Besides Wisconsin and Indiana,
MSU, and Ohio State managed to
finish ahead of the Michigan
thinclads.
In spite of the fact that they
turned in the best performances
of their careers, three Wolverine
trackmen failed in their attempts
to give Michigan a first. In the
high jump Michigan ace J o h n
Mann cleared the bar at 6-11 on
his second try, setting a new var-
sity record, to clinch second in
the competition. Six jumpers
managed to clear 6-10 to set a
new Big Ten record. Badger Pat
Matzdorf took first place with a
jump of 7-0;, after failing in three
attempts at 7-1.
POLE VAULTER Ron Shortt
also took a second place as he
vaulted 15-6. After attempting
15-102 once, a pulled muscle
made it impossible for h i m to
continue in the competition, leav-
ing Ohio State's Ken Koch to try
for first place unchallenged.

Koch managed to clear 15-10%
on his final try when the b a r
bounced in the air, flipped over,
and landed back on the standard.
IN THE 600, the expected re-
match of Bill Wehrwein and Norm
Cornwell failed to come off when
Cornwell failed to qualify for the
finals. Freshman Eric Chapman,
running the event for only the
third time, supplied the large con-
tingent of Michigan fans with a
few thrills as he captured third
place with a time of 1:10.2, only
.3 of a second off the varsity rec-
ord.
Other Wolverine bright spots
included third and fourth place
finishes for Godfrey Murray in
the 70 yard low and high hurdles,
respectively, and a second in the
triple jump for Ira Russell with
a 48-2 leap.
THE DESPERATION of the
meet, as far as t h e Wolverines
were concerned, was probably best
typified by Paul Armstrong's val-
iant try for second place in the
half mile, only to stumble and fall
five yards short of the tape to fin-
ish sixth.
In what is getting to be a habit,
MSU's Herb Washington again
literally ran away. with first place
in the 60 yard dash with a 6.0
clocking, in one of t he fastest
fields ever assembled.
Winzenreid, the American
champ in the mile on a dirt track,
turned n two scintilating per-
formances in the mile and half-
mile as he coasted to wins in both
events.

OPENS TONIGHT...
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS present
LIFE IS A DREAM
by CALDERON
Wednesday-Saturday, Trueblood Theatre, Frieze
Bldg:, 8:00 P.M. Box Office open 12:30-8:00 P.M.,
764-5387

-Daily-Dave Schindel
MSU's Herb Washington sprints to victory
WIN ONE, LOSE TWO:
Netters gain experience in West

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By JIM McFERSON
Even though rain forestalled any
more than three hours of outdoor
practice and they faced four of
the top teams in the nation, Mich-
igan's tennis team came home this
week "with what we wanted," ac-
cording to tennis coach Brian Eis-
ner.
The want on Eisner's list was
top-flight competition and he got
It from four West Coast schools:
University of Southern California,
UCLA, Stanford, and University
of California at Berkeley. T h e
team won once over Berkeley and
lost to USC and Stanford. The
match with. UCLA was rained out
during a typical California deluge.
Rudy Tomjanovich w a s
named to the 1970 Look Maga-
ze - U. S. Basketball Writers
Association District 4 team an-
nounced yesterday. Named
along with Tomjanovich were
Austin Carr of Notre Dame;
Rick Mount, Purdue; Ralph
Simpson, Michigan State; and
Dave Sorenson, Ohio State.
Carr and Mount were also
among the top ten players in
the country selected in the
Look poll. Named along w i t h
them were Bob Lanier, St.
Bonaventure; Dan Issel, Ken-
tucky; Calvin Murphy, Niag-
ara; Pete Maravich, LSU;
Sidney Wicks, UCLA; S t e v e
Collins, New Mexico State;
Charlie Scott, North Carolina;
and John Roche, South Caro-
lina.

The Wolverines arrived in Cali-
fornia last Saturday with exactly
zero hours of outside practice
(they've been playing inside only)
and as Eisner said "expected to
have two good days of outdoor
practice."
Inclemency limited the team to
just three hours between showers
before they' came up against the
big Trojahs of USC, defending
NCAA chamipons for two straight
years.
The final score was 7-2 in USC's
favor, but this failed to depress
Eisner. "All in all, I was quite
pleased with our performance
against last year's national
champions," commented Eisner.
"We didn't play too badly for the
amount of practice we had."
Once again the intemperate
skies over the coast Intervened
wetly, this time during the match
against last year's NCAA runner-
up UCLA and caught Michigan on
the short end of a 4=0 score.
Stanford, always tough and un-
usually talented this year, m e t
Michigan with equal depth and
banged out a 7-2 win. The num-
ber three doubles team of Dick
Ravreby and Bruce DeBoer and
number two singles Joel Ross were
the winning Wolverines.
Winding up the trip in the
heartland of revolution; Michigan
beat nightfall long enough to take
four matches and ended up with
a 51/-31/2 victory after dividing
up the points on the remaining
three matches with a solid Berke-
ley team.
Highlighting the tour, accord-

ing to Eisner was the play of Ross
and the DeBoer-Ravreby duo. Ross,
number two singles, won two
matches, one of them against
Mike Mullan of Berkeley - a rug-
ged performer.
Until the weather breaks a n d
spring actually does get to Ann
Arbor, the team will practice in-' A
doors and each player will attempt
to better his position in the line-
up through challenge matches.
One match to watch will be the
battle for number one singles be-
tween John Hainline and M a r k
Conti, both rivals for a long time.
Conti was unable to go on the
tour because he missed a number
of practices while recovering from
injuries but expects to add more
punch to the Wolverine squad.

:NHL Standings

'4

Boston
New York
Chicago
Detroit
Montreal
Toronto

Eastern Division
W L T Pt. GF GA
35 14 15 85 239 186
34 16 14 82 212 149
36 20 7 79 202 145
33 18 12 78 196 162
31 19 13 75 199 162
26 26 11 63 196203
Western Division

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An Engineer who starts with RCA in 1970
will be part of an amazing future.,t

St. Louis 31 23 9 7
Pittsburgh 23 30 105
Philadelphia 15 26 235
Minnesota 12 30 204
Oakland 17 37 94
Los Angeles 10 44 103
Yesterday's Results
No games scheduled.
Today's Games
New York at Montreal
Detroit at Toronto
Boston at Chicago
Pittsburgh at Oakland
St. Louis at Minnesota

71 184 150
56 153 196
53 178 196
44 178 209
44 140 212
30 141 248

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If you measure achievement
in technological discovery,'no
industry can surpass either the
past record or future potential
of electronics.
And, if you're part of a
company that is as diverse in
all areas of technology as RCA,
you are in for an exhilarating
ride to the top of your
profession.
We develop new technologies
using the total systems concept.
For instance: large time-
sharing computers; satellite
systems such as TIROS; solar
power; printing production;
superconductivity; new
materials; new sources of
energy; broad band
communications systems;
liquid crystals. But these are
just a few of the areas that
concern our engineers and
scientists today. Tomorrow is
coming up awfully fast.
The problems we will be
faced with during the next
30 years, and how well we
solve them, will determine

the future well-being of all
mankind.
You can start your
engineering career in one of
our Rotational Programs to
give you a.wide over-view of
our activities, or, if you prefer,
direct assignment to one of our
numerous technical areas.
Whatever course you choose,
you will find yourself working
with a unique group of human
beings, who are deeply
involved with the future.
Electronic and mechanical
engineers, we would like to
talk to you. Take the first
step-get in touch with your
College Placement Director,
or write directly to RCA
College Relations, Dept. F,
Cherry Hill, Camden,
New Jersey 08101 ...
We not only believe in equal
opportunity employment--
we practice it.
1161

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Why engineering students graduate to Lockheed.
Progress is a matter of degrees. But, that's only the beginning. At Lockheed Missiles
and Space Company, we're working on wideworld. ..otherworld... upperworld... and
subworld projects. 11 We're pretty high on space...we've got Agena and other
extremely advanced programs to prove it. And, when it comes to ballistic missiles,
Polaris and Poseidon show an arc of triumph. We think deeply, too ... consider our
deep submergence vehicles, for example. And, just to show you our feet are solidly
on the ground, we're working on advanced land vehicles. Information? Business,
government and industry get it out of our systems.
LMSC has beenin the sea...on land...in the air...in space...and now, we're com-
ing to your campus. We'd like to talk to you about coming to LMSC. Contact your place-
ment office for an appointment. Our interview team will be on campus Mar.18 and 19.
Move up to Lockheed... or move over for those who do. Q If an interview is incon-
venient at this time, write to: College Relations Coordinator, P.O. Box 504, Sunnyvale,
California 94088. LMSC is an equal opportunity employer.
MissILES a SPACE COMPANY
A GROUP OIVqSON OPWCK "E " AIRCRAFT CORPORAON

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U.S.NAVY DSRV10 5.
Deep Submergence
Rescue vehicle
Agena
(And other advanced space programs)

Twister
(Advanced land vehicles)

Poseidon

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