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March 11, 1970 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-11

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Wednesday, March 11, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Wednesday, March 11, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

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Arborland Shopping Center
The Sophistacats

Fishery
By PAT MEARS
After two weeks of uncer-
tainty, the federal government's
Great Lakes Research Labora-
tory in Ann Arbor will continue
to operate, Rep. Marvin L. Esch
(R-Ann Arbor) announced yes-
terday. The fisheries laboratory
will suffer a budget cutback of
$244,000, however.
It was previously expected
that the Department of the In-
terior would cut as much as
$400,000 from the lab's appro-
priations for the 1971 fiscal
year beginning July 1. The cut
of only $244,000 will limit the
lab's research work, but not to
the extent of the original pro-
posed cut. .
The Great Lakes Research Lab-
oratory has been described by
Esch as "a true giant in the
anti-pollution field". Forty years
ago the lab was the first to
report the danger of the pollu-
tion in Lake Erie and to warn
the public of the effect of the
sea lamphrey on the lake trout
in the Great Lakes.

lab

The functions of the labora-
tory today include research on
the effects of pesticides and
pollution on fresh-water fish.
It also continues studying the
sea lamphrey and the alewives,
fish that inhabit the Great Lakes
and frequently perish in large
numbers, causing a health and
safety hazard.
The world famous lab, which
has been described as the larg-
est, best-equipped and b e s t-
staffed of its k i n d in fresh-
water research, also performs
some functions with the Univer-
sity.
The laboratory employs a num-
ber of students, both full- and
part-time, and sponsors sem-
inars and classes.
A federal official connected
with the research lab stated that
the reason for the cutback in
funds is related to two factors,
The first is the Administration's
economy drive to halt inflation.
Until inflation is slowed down,
there will be little chance for
more appropriations directed

toward research of this kind, the
official said.
Also involved in the cutback
is the priority given to ocean
and salt-water research o v e r
fresh water research. The De-
partment of the Interior deter-
mines these priorities.
This department has planned
that the laboratory, which is
presently under the Federal
Bureau of Commercial Fisheries,
be transferred to the Federal
Bureau of Sports Fisheries and
Wildlife. The proposed switch,
under the department's present
plans, will take place at the end
of the 1970-71 fiscal year.
The reason for the change of
the lab from the Bureau of Com-
mercial Fisheries to the Bureau
of Sports Fisheries and Wild-
life, according to the Depart-
ment of the Interior, is because
the emphasis in Great L a k e s
Fishing in the past years has
changed from commercial to
recreational.
When, at the end of the 1970-
1971 fiscal year, the lab is

transferred to the Bureau of
Sports Fisheries and Wildlife,
the regional office in Ann Ar-
bor will be relocated. The new
location has not yet been deter-
mined.
In spite of this transfer. Esch
has stated that he has informa-
tion from a reliable source that
the fisheries laboratory will be
phased out of existence in the
next two years.
Esch added that he will di-
rect an appeal to both the House
and Senate appropriations com-
mittees for the restoration of
the funds in order that the lab-
oratory continue its research.
If the original cut of $400,-
000 had been carried through,
the research in environmental
effects on fresh water fish in
the Great Lakes due to recrea-
tional and commercial fishing,
waste pollutants and pesticides
would have been abandoned, ac-
cording to a federal official.
As it stands with a smaller
cutback, it is only certain that
11 of the' 78 Jobs of the lab's
work force will be abolished.
After July 1, more personnel are
expected to be dismissed, an of-
ficial stated.
THESIS DEADLINE
MARCH 16
Avoid the Hassle.
Check our Rates and
Professional Service
CAMPUS
MULTISERVICE
214 Nickels Arcade
662-4222

to continue research

1

"Safety belts? Not if
I'm just going down to
the supermarket."
-Kathleen Farrell
(1943-1968)
"Safety belts? They
just make me nervous.
Besides, they wrinkle
your clothes."
--Louis Claypool
(1931.1968)
"Who can ever
remember to use the
darned things?"'
'-Gordan Fenton
(1921.1968)
Whatyour excuse?

r
"Y.
',

Returning from a six-month engagement in Detroit
Wednesday, Thursday,, Friday and Saturday

NO COVER

Starting at 9 P.M.
DINING and DANCING
Unlimited Lighted Parking
971-6877

NO MINIMUM

8th ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL,
MARCH 10-15
(in cooperation with CINEMA GUILD and DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER)
TONIGHT: WEDNESDAY, 7,9, 11-EACH SHOW IS DIFFERENT
Great Stuff For All Ages
Program Info: 662.8871 75c ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

Advertising contribute
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U

UNION-LEAGUE

Michigras
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"half-country, half-gospel and the
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THE NEW YORK TIMES

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Saturday, March 21

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