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March 11, 1970 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-11

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Wednesday, March H, 1910

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pae Nine

Wednesday, March ii, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
I

PelnA Ni n A

W

on this and that
Run For The Roses,
revisited
eric siegel -.
IT DOESN'T HAVE that certain catchiness of, say, a Si-
mon and Garfunkel album that makes you want to keep
playing the songs over and over again. And it doesn't have the
driving beat of the Iron Butterfly or SRC that makes you want
to turn on the record player every time you're drunk or stoned.
In fact, it isn't even the first of its kind; The Year of the Pen-
nant preceeds it by at least a couple of years.
But if you think that albums on football teams are only for
old, nostalgic alumni who sit around reminiscing from their
rocking chairs, you might be surprised at Run For The Roses.
Three-two-one. It's all over! Michigan beat Ohio State, 24-
12! The Wolverines pull the upset of the year.
RUN FOR THE ROSES - produced by WAAM radio, nar-
rated by WAAM's Larry Zimmer, and sold at WAAM studios
and the Michigan ticket office - is the story of the 1969 Mich-
igan football team. There's nothing fancy about the record: it
consists mostly of taped segments of Zimmer's radio covers,
with a little narration and some recorded quotes from Bo and
a few of the players.
Iandoff to Doughty the tailback .. . he races over the
25 .. .he's at the,30 ... he's at the 35 .. . the 40 .. he's
in the clear ... he's going to go all the way .. . he's going
all the way ... twenty .. .ten ... Touchdown!
The release of the record comes at an opportune time. By
now, a lot of the exciting parts of the past season have been for-
gotten; even a few of the highlights are beginning to become
obscure. It's sort of a nice thing to lie down on your living room
', floor and be reminded of the excitement and details of Michi-
gan's victory over OSU three months after it happened.
Fourth down and two . they're going for a first down
fourth and two' ... here's Kern... Michigan rushes
.. Otis piles through . . . they might've stopped him .. . I
think they stopped him at the 10 yard line .. . Mike Taylor hit
him .. . Michigan held! THE WOLVERINES TAKE OVER AT
THE TEN!
In fact, the highlight of the record, like the highlight of
the season, concerned the victory over the Buckeyes. Most of the
second side of the record is devoted to that 'victory, and Zimmer
does a nice job of re-creating the tension and excitement of the
game. Zimmer sets the scene with some brief narration and then
switches to the recordings.of his game cover. '
There's the punt, and it's a good one ... it's a spiral com-
ing down to the 40 ... taken there by Pierson .. . he's at the
45 ... h 's at the 50 ... he's at the 45 ... he's got block-
ers i froit of him .. .
The rest of the record is divided pretty evenly among the
other nine games of the season. There is also some pre and post-
season commentary by Zimmer, which seems to me to be the low
point of Run For The Roses. The time spent rattling off names
and statistics would probably better be given over to more re-
corded segments of Zimmer's game covers.
Zimmer also regurgitates a few cliches during that com-
mentary, but these drawbacks are relatively minor, and suit,
ably overshadowed by the positive aspects of the taped portions
of the games.
But if you don't want to invest the money for the record
' but you think the idea is kind of nice, you're not at a total loss.
Just borrow a friend's tape recorder and do your own version of
the record. After all, there's bound to be a lot more great sea-
sons in the next few years. Ain't that right, Woody?
TENTH S1'RAIGHT W
Hoosiers hold t

Knicks clinch tie for title

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Cazzie Russell
led New York on two third quarter
blitzes and the Knicks overwlhelm-
ed the Seattle SuperSonics 117-99
last night in a National Basket-
ball Association game.
The New York victory combined'
with a loss suffered by Milwaukee
clinched for the Knicks at least
a share of NBA Eastern Division
title.
The victory was the sixth in
seven games for the Knicks, who
are closing in on their first NBA
Eastern Division title in 16 years
and dealt another blow to the
SuperSonics, battling for a play-
off berth in the West.
Russell an All-American while
playing for Michigan scored 14 of
his game-high 30 points in the
third quarter when the Knicks
turned a 54-53 halftime deficit in-

to an 88-74 spread entering the
final period.
Russell hit five points in a 14-4
spree that put the Knicks ahead
to stay 67-60. He added six more
in a 12-2 run for an 81-68 lead and
Seattle never threatened again.
Celts' era ends
DETROIT - The Detroit Pis-
tons saw a 20-point lead vanish
to two points before spurting away
Baily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
ELLIOT LEGOW

in the waning minutes to beat
Boston 115-112 last night and oust
the defending world champion
Celtics from the National Basket-
ball Association's playoffs.
It was the first time in 20 years
that Boston was eliminated from
the NBA playoffs.
The loss made it mathematically
impossible for the Celtics, who
have eight games remaining to

catch the Philadelphia 76ers, hold-
ers of the fourth and final playoff
spot in the Eastern Division.
After Detroit stormed ahead
82-62 in the fourth quarter, the
Celtics rallied on the defensive
play of Don Chaney and scoring
of Henry Finkel and John Hav-
licek to pull within two points at
100-98 with 4:48 left.

lour F u e
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Lessons can be spread over a
period of several months to a
year, or for out of town stu-
dents, a period of one week.
" Opportunity for review of past
lessons via tape at the center.
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EDUCATIONAL CENTER
TUTORING AND GUIDANCE SINCE 1956
1675 East 16th Str*t
Srookiyn, N.Y. 11229
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SCORING SCANT:
Stisckmen drop pair

By BILL ALTERMAN
The Michigan Lacrosse club
went all the way to Virginia to
open its spring campaign-but the
improvement in climate did not
carry over to the team as they lost
twice. Thursday they were up-
ended by VPI 4-2 and Saturday,
though they played better, they
again tasted defeat, this time 14-7
at the hands of Roanoke.
Skip Flanagan, one of the play-
er-coaches, however, did not view
the trip as a failure. "We worked
them real hard," he stated, "this
trip got us into excellent condi-
tion." Flanagan believes only time
will tell how successful the eastern
trip was. The team's nqxt game
will be away at Oberlin on March
21st.
Flanagan admitted they played
a "poor offensive game" against
VPI. The sticknen were unable to
take advantage of man-up situ-
ations as they could not register
a single tally in the 7' minutes
they held an advantage. Michigan
outshot VPI 39-26 in the sloppily
played game but only Dan Lamble
and Bill Cheevers were able to put
one in the net.
Saturday, Michigan played a
better game but, unfortunately,
they also played a better opponent.
Roanoke, which has been prac-
ticing two weeks longer than
vIN
rnk title

Michigan, has been able to get
several players from around Bal-
timore where lacrosse is heavily
emphasized in high school. They
had an experienced, well-drilled
varsity which had been practicing
for six weeks as compared to
Michigan which has only been
drilling for four.
Fifteen minutes of penalties
hurt Michigan badly as Roanoke
was able to score seven times while
they were a man up. Still Flan-
agan thought Michigan "played
very good ball."
Flanagan led Michigan's scor-
ing with two goals while Tim Rod-
ger, Bob Gillon, Dick Dean, Steve
Hart and Roger Mills had one goal
apiece.
SBillboard.
Anyone 'interested in becom-
ing a football manager should
contact Neil Hiller at 769-7396.

-Associated Press
CAZZIE RUSSELL (33) and Dick Barnett (12) fight for the ball
against Seattle Supersonic Dorie Murray in NBA action last night.

Join The Daily Sports Staff

By ROD ROBERTS
Pre-meet prognostications rated
lIndiana, with possibly the b e s t
team ever assembled in intercol-
legiate swimming history, a shoe-
4n for its tenth straight Big Ten
Swimming ChampionshiO at
Bloomington last weekend. Also
for a tenth time, Michigan was
predicted for the runner-up spot,
oas their only loss in dual meet
competition had been to the Hoos-
iers.
The only competition between
teams was supposed to be between
Michigan State and Ohio State
for third. Only somebody forgot
to tell Michigan State. Michigan
Coach Ous Stager admitted, "I
hadn't even thought -about them."
Thei Spartans completely ignor-
ed the Buckeyes and went right
after Michigan in second. While
the Wolverines did end up in se-
cond place with a substantial 52
point pad over the Spartans, it
wasn't until Saturday, with five
events left in the three day, eigh-
teen event competition, that Mich-
igan pulled away.
The final totals read Indiana
554, Michigan 363, Michigan State
311, Ohio State 267, Wisconsin
147, Minnesota 124, Illinois 89,
Purdue 38, Iowa 24, and North-
western 18.
Indiana's 554 points was a new
record. Indiana's thirteen e v e n t
championships was a record. Ind-
lana's 191 point margin of victory
was also, a record.
Since the Hoosiers won just
about everything in sight, it's hard
to believe that they actually were,
not trying. But Indiana C o a c h
Doc Counsilman let his swim-
mers enter the events that they
wanted to and turned down a
chance to win every single event.
The preliminaries of the v e r y
first event warned the Wolverines
of what was to come. Michigan
Captain Gary Kinkead just missed
getting into the finals of the 500
yard freestyle, as he qualified sev-
enth, The same thing was to hap-

pe five more times to Wolverine
swimers.
Indiana's Gary Hall won the 500,
followed by four teammates as
the Hoosiers were,! out of sight al-
ready, with 65 points in the event.
Kinkead took the consolations,
while Michigan State got a sixth,
and ninth.
Hoosier freshman Larry Barbiere
then won the 200 yard individ-
ual medley edging out Michigan's
Juan Bello, the defending champ-
ion, 1:55.97 to 1:56.15. Michigan
State got a fourth, while Wolver-
ines Ray McCullough and T i m
Norlen were limited to seventh.
In the 50 yard freestyle, Michi-
gan State went wild amassing 39
points with a 1-2-5 finish, but the
Wolverines scored more points (26)
in the one meter diving than any-
one else with Dick Rydze in
fourth, Al Gagnet fifth, and Bruce
McMannaman eighth. The Spar-
tans' second in medley relay just
behind Indiana gave therih 102
points to Michigan's 83. Indiana
had 146.
The Wolverines overtook the
Spartans on the second day as
they outscored them in e v e r y
event. In the 200 yard butterfly
Mark Spitz set a Big Ten record
with Michigan's Byron MacDonald
and Don Peterson fourth and
sixth, and Tim Norlen and Larry
Day at seventh and eighth in the
consolations.
After a relatively slow 200 yard
freestyle which gave Michigan a
third and fifth from Juan Bello
and Ray McCullough in a blanket
finish, amazing Dave Clark took
fourth, and Bill Mahoney seventh
in the 200 yard breaststroke.
Freshman Steve McCarthy came1
through with a third in the 100
back as Indiana's Larry Barbiere
set a pool record.
Gary Kinkead became Michi-
gan's only individual champion by
taking the 400 yard individual
medley with Don Peterson in at
fourth, before Indiana won the
88 yard free relay with ease.

Although Michigan was 28 points
up on the Spartans going into the
last day, MSU made one last try.
They picked up 19 in the 1650
free won by Gary Hall, as the
Wolverines didn't enter a man.
Ohio State's Jim Baehren and Bel-
lo finished 1-2 in the 100 free, but
a fourth and fifth for Michigan
State pulled them to within a
point.
But a knowing Gus Stager re-
vealed, "State was higher than a
kite on Thursday and Friday, so
I knew they had to fall on Sat-
urday." And they did, as Michi-
gan nearly doubled what the
Spartans got in the last six events.
Kinkead was the surprise pace-
setter in the 200 yard backstroke
before taking second to the meet's
only triple winner -- Indiana's
Larry Barbiere, McCarthy and
Peterson got a fifth and sixth. In-
diana also won the next two
events, with Mahoney and Clark
in fourth and fifth in the 200
breast, and MacDonald, Day, Nor-
'len. and McCullough adding third,
sixth, eighth and ninth in the 100
fly.
Minnesota's Craig Lincoln then
pulled the big upset of the meet
taking the three meter board over
low board winner Jim Henry.
Pilots' future
still in doubt
By The Associated Press
TAMPA - A special American
League meeting to consider the
troubled Seattle franchise was
called off abruptly yesterday in a
cloud of conflicting statements.
Joe Cronin president of the
league, announced that the post-
ponement was made because of
the illness of Bill Daley, the prin-
cipal Seattle owner, who could not
attend.
With opening day only four
weeks 6ff, there have been per-
sstent reports that the franchise
might be moved to Milwaukee be-
fore the 1970 season.
Cronin hinted no definite action
would have been taken even if the
meeting had been held. The
league. was to have heard a report
on all aspects of the Seattle situa-
tion from its special representa-
tive, Roy Hamey.

SPEAKER SYSTEMS
SIGHT
BUT NEVER
OUT OF SOUND
HIMRl BUYS
Ann Arbor-East Lansing
a 618 S. Main 769-4700
"Quality Sound Through
Quality Equipment"

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St. Antony's College, Oxford
ON

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn"
DATE: Wednesday, March 11
TIME: 4:10 p.m.
PLACE: Auditorium C, Angell Hall
Mr. Hayward is a distinguished critic of current trends in Soviet literature. During the current
academic year he is associated with the Russian Institute, Columbia University. His publications
include translations of Dr. Zhivago and Isaac Babel, On Trial, about the trial of Sinyovsky and
Daniel, many books on Solzhenitsyn, and a great many others.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Center for Russian and East European Studies
PRESENTS A LECTURE
by

MAX

HIAYWARD

II

. 1i

.

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WHAT

MA KES

NEISNER'S

SO

SPECIAL?

Professional Standings

IT TAKES A SPECIAL TYPE OF PERSON. NOT JUST SHEER NUMBERS, BUT PEOPLE
WHOSE EFFORTS, TALENTS AND IMAGINATION ARE ALL WRAPPED UP IN A
GROWTH-MINDED COMPANY.
MERCHANDISE PROGRAM-BS CANDIDATE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-MARKETING
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NBA
Eastern Division
W L Pet.
New York 58 16 .784
Milwaukee 54 24 .701
Baltimore 46 ,30 .605
Philadelphia 40 36 .526
Cincinnati 33 43 A34
.,otn21 41 A*19

GB
6
12
19
26

Boston at Cincinnati
Baltimore at San Francisco
ABA
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
Indiana 49 17 .742 --
Carolina 33 32 .508 15Y2
Kentucakv 3 22 22 OS 151A~

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