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February 25, 1970 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-25

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Wednesday, February 25, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Wednesday, February 25, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

1[

IF

I.

Against
The k/lI

Black Sox predated
McLain by 50 years
By RICKEY CORNFELD
T IS JUST a coincidence, but the disclosure of Denny McLain's
alleged gambling activities has occurred exactly 50 years
after the disclosure of the Black Sox scandal.
The Black Sox scandal was the most serious crisis major
league baseball has faced. It involved the throwing of the 1919
World Series by eight members of the Chicago White Sox.
The Series was "won" by the Cincinnati Reds, five games to
i three.
The eight Black Sox were guilty of one of the worst crimes
in baseball history, yet they are usually viewed sympathetically.
The reason may be that they played in a day when ball
players acted like ball players, not corporation executives. And
it may have had something to do with the conditions behind
their actions.
The reason they threw the Series seems to have been to
get revenge against Charles Comiskey, the Sox owner. Comiskey
was a miserly, tyrannical man, and all the players-not just
the eight Black Sox-hated him.
COMISKEY SKRIMPED on salaries and meal allowances.
He even made the players wear dirty uniforms sometimes, rather
than pay for laundry.
By throwing the series the players were getting back at
Comiskey and getting some of the money Comiskey deprived
them of.
The originator of the plot was first baseman Chick Gandil.
Gandil, was familiar at the art of throwing games. He had ap-
parently done it often.
The most prominent participant was left fielder Shoeless
Joe Jackson, one of the greatest natural hitters in the game's
history.
The other six were pitchers Eddie Cicotte, a 29 game winner
that year, and Claude "Lefty" Williams, a 23 game winner,
third baseman Buck Weaver, center fielder Happy Felsch, short-
stop Swede Risberg and utility man Fred McMullin.
Weaver decided not to participate, but he is still considered
one of the Black Sox for not reporting the plot.
THE EVIDENCE of the fix is not all to be found in the
statistics of the Series. Of the 17 runs batted in by the White
Sox, the seven participants - ignoring Weaver - got 13. They
scored 11 of Chicago's 20 runs and made 30 of its 59 hits.
Cicotte's earned run average was a respectable 2.91, but
he committee two errors in the fifth inning of the fourth game to
allow the game's only two runs.gWilliams, a pitcher known
for great control, was wilds throughout the Series and had an
e.rla. of 6.61.
The way the players lost the Series was by missing the key
plays. Felsch, who ranked just below Ty Cobb and Tris Speaker
among great fielding center fielders, in a d e two errors and
watched another ball drop between him and Jackson.
That the players were purposely losing was obvious to some
people by the end of the second game. Kid Gleason, the man-
ager, and catcher Ray Schalk and second baseman Eddie Col,
lins, both future Hall of Famers, could tell.
Gleason and Schalk were so mad they started fights with
Gandil and Williams.
Sportswriter High Fullerton and Christy Mathewson, watch-
ing from the press box, also suspected a plot.
AFTER THE SERIES, most knowledgeable baseball people
knew there was a fix but could not prove anything. Baseball
officials were scared. They did not know what to do.
They were torn between exposing the fix and hushing it up.
So they did neither.
But it was exposed for them in a documented article by
Fullerton, published in the New York World in 1920.
As a result of the article, the eight players were tried in
federal court in Chicago that fall, along with gambler Arnold
Rothstein, the man behind the operation.
The players had a team of excellent defense lawyers, sec-
retly supplied by organized baseball.
THE BLACK SOX were acquitted, but before they could be-.
come too jubilant they were barred from organized baseball for
life.
Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, newly installed as base-
ball's first commissioner, said, "Regardless of the verdict of
juries, no player that throws a ball game, no player that enter-
tains proposals or promises to throw a game, no player that
sits in conference with a bunch of crooked players and gamblers
where the ways and means of throwing games are discussed and
does not promptly tell his club about it wi ever play profes-
sional baseball."
By acting decisively - though almost reluctantly - base-
ball saved public faith in the game.
The real losers were the eight Black Sox. They had been
promised $80,000 by Rothstein.
They only got $30,000.
prom iseCd R$w +2.n ' '''u' .: '' L.}$ -t

On IMfun
By E$IC SIEGEL
Sports Editor
Daily Sports Analysis
Last month, David Mildner and John McKen-
zie, two members of the Advisory Committee
on Recreation. Intramurals and Club sports,
proposed that all non-money making varsity
sports be granted the status of a club sport.
The idea behind the proposal is that by
granting amateur status to these sports-which
include all sports except football, basketball and
hockey-a surplus in funds would be created
in the athletic department. These funds could
then be used, according to Mildner and McKen-
zie, to finance a badly needed replacement facil-
ity for Waterman and Barbour Gymnasiums, and
a general tuition hike would not be needed for
the construction of the building.
The Mildner-McKenzie proposal, is tentative-
ly scheduled to be discussed at a meeting of the
Student Relations Committee next week as part
of the broader question of financing the intra-
mural buildings. In addition, an SGC referendum
on the question of using student fees for the
construction of an IM building is expected to
be held in March.
The proposal has already generated quite a
bit of discussion, however, especially among
athletic department officials, and club sports
members.

Bob Gillon, the President of the Michigan
Club Sports Association, said in a telephone in-
terview Monday night that there are quite a
few people who "would like to challenge the
Athletic Department in regards to minor sports
that don't pay for themselves."
Athletic Director Don Canham, who previous-
ly branded the proposal as "ridiculously and im-
practical," takes a different view of the situ-
ation.
"Mildner's proposal is bucking the whole
trend of inter-collegiate athletics," Canham
claims. "The history of inter-collegiate athletics
is that teams start as club sports, and then
want to attain varsity status.
As evidence for his position, Canham cites
the fact that baseball ,was originally started on
this campus on a club sport basis and then
moved to varsity status. In addition, he says he
has been approached by three club sports in the
past year who would like to achieve the status
of a varsity sport.
At the root of the differences of opinion be-
tween Canham and Mildner and Gillon-apart
from the question of financing-is a question of
the priorities of the athletic department.
Those who favor the Mildner-McKenzie pro-
possal are not motivated any desire to strip those
sports of their status in the athletic world.
Rather, they are questioning the wisdom of
spending large sums om money on sports such

as baseball, tennis, golf and track, when only a
few students are interested in them. "It seems
that it's very hard to justify the expense of a
sport like baseball," Mildner says.
Proponents of the Mildner-McKenzie report
are quick to point out that under the Regents
revised by-laws of 1968, the athletic department
is charged with a responsibility to club sports
and intramurals as well as to intercollegiate
athletics.
Given this dual responsibity. many students
feel it is inequitable to expect club sports to bear
the brunt of their expenses and students to pay
for the construction of new IM facilities, when
non-money making varsity sports have their
expenses paid in full by the athletic department.
The question of athletic department priorities
is all the more relevant in view of the fact that
in the last view years there has been a sub-
stantial increase in the number of faculty and
students using the IM facilities on an informal,
individual basis as well as a proliferation in the
number of club sports on campus. The Mildner-
McKenzie proposal is, basically, a proposal to
help meet the needs and interests of those
people.
But Canham contends that, even -If the
proposal is adopted, it would not release enough
funds to finance the construction of the proposed
new building.
When you're talking about athletic depart-

ding and Athletic Dept

. priorities
ment funds, you're talking about an extremely
small amount of money," Canham says. "A new
IM building costs about $11 million, and the total
athletic department budget is only two and a
half million dollars.
"The entire budget for tennis, for example, is
just $6000," continues Canham, "and it costs
over $150,000 a year for the heat, light and
maintenance of the IM building. The two just
don't balance."
In addition, Canham claims that at least
some of the athletic department revenues would
be lost if the Mildner-McKenzie proposal is
adopted. "Alumni contribute quite a bit of money
to non-money making sports," Canham says.
"I don't think we'd get those contributions if the
sports lost their varsity status."
Despite these problems, however, the Mildner-
McKenzie proposal would not seem to be totally
unfeasible. In a sense, though, it is almost futile
to discuss it. Canham is firmly against it, and
one suspects that if there is going to be any sub-
stantial change in the priorities of the athletic
department, Canham will have to give his ap-
proval.
In another sense, though, the proposal and
the discussion it has generated, is . extremely
beneficial. As the Mildner-McKenzie report
states, "The overall picture of sports at Michi-
gan (must) be reviewed to place intramural
facilties in proper perspective."

Nip*

Impotent'

Indiana

whips

Wolverines

''I

By AL SHACKELFORD
Special To The Daily
BLOOMINGTON - Underdog
Indiana lured Michigan into Indi-
ana University Fieldhouse last
night and stuck the Wolverines
with a 102-93 loss, despite another
great performance from Michi-
gan's Rudy Tomjanovich.
Tomjanovich tossed in 36 points
and led a second half comeback
by Michigan which gave them a
74-72 lead with about eight min-
utes left in the game.
IBut then Indiana's big Ken
Johnson took over. He went wild,
firing in basket after basket to
keep Indiana one nervous step
ahead of the Wolverines, until the
Hoosiers finally opened up a 92-86
lead and with 1:48 to go and were
never headed.
INDIANA looked nothing like
the team their 2-8 Big Ten rec-
ord indicated they would be; they
beat the Wolverines in nearly
every phase of the game.
A long jumper by Rudy gave
Michigan first blood in the game
with 19:36 to go and the Wolver-
ines raced to a quick 9-4 lead.
Indiana stormed back ahead 10-9
at the 16:13 mark on a hook by
Rick Ford and remained in the
lead for most of the first half.
Jim Harris and big Toby Wright
scored 13 and 10 points respect-
ively to offset 21 by Rudy and give
the Hoosers a 47-41 halftime lead.
Indiana beat Michigan on the
boards and forced the Wolverines
to commit 13 turnovers in that

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL DINNER

first half, as they looked stronger,
quicker, and more hungry that the
Wolverines.
Wrightnled the Hoosiers with
124 points and Johnson, who scored'
22, controlled the boards. Hoosier
guard Jim Harris, a man with
more moves than an escaped con-
vict,' added 22 and Ford helped
out with 19.
TOMJANOVICH was unstop-
pable, working inside for amazing
layups and rocketing in long
jumpers by the handful. Even the
rabid Hoosier fans who packed
the fieldhouse were forced to
cheer Rudy's efforts. Rod Ford hit
17, mostly on cherry picks gained
from the potent Michigan fast
break, but Michigan's scoring was
thin beyond that point.
Michigan outrebounded Indiana
36-32, but the Hoosiers got off
more shots than Michigan. Michi-
gan shot a sizzling .597 from the
field, but made 20 errors and were
outshot by the Hoosiers from the
foul stripe.
The Hoosiers are now breathing
down the Wolverine's neck in Big
Ten play at 3-8. Michigan is 4-7.
Big Red pounces

0 !
Ilini scalp
Bucks belt
By The Associated Press
EAST LANSING, Mich.-Illinois
broke a six-game losing streak
yesterday by defeating Michigan
State 74-67 in a Big Ten basketball
game.
The Spartans came from a 34-
28 halftime deficit to tie the game
53-53 with about eight minutes'
left to play. But Illinois then scor-
ed 11 straight points to put the
game out of reach for the Spar-
tans.
Illinois guard Rick Howat paced
Illinois with 19 points. Illinois is
now 13-8 overall and 6-4 in Big
Ten play. MSU dropped to 7-14
and 3-8, respectively. Ralph Simp-
son had 18 points for MSU.
MADISON, Wis.--Ohio State's
hot-handed Buckeyes raced to a
22-point halftime advantage, then
waltzed to an easy 98-86 Big Ten
basketball victory over Wisconsin
last night.
Jim Cleamons scored 27 points
and teammate Dave Sorenson
chipped in 25 for the Buckeyes'
16th victory in 21 games, and sev-
enth in 11 loop games.
The frigid Badgers fell behind
quickly, hitting only 27 per cent
of their field shots in the first
half while the visitors hit 50 per
cent for a 51-29 lead at intermis-
sion.
Faulty ballhandling also hurt
Wisconsin. Badgers committed 11
turnovers to Ohio State's four in
the first half.
Ohio State also got the Badgers
in foul trouble, and three Wiscon-
sin starters - Clarence Sherrod,

Spartans;
Badgers
captain Al Henry and Lee Oler-
were on the bench with at least
three fouls each before halftime.
Sherrod led all scorers with 30
points.
Jacksonville squeaks by
j JACKSONVILLe, Fla. - Little
Vaughn Wedeking popped in ,a
jumper with four seconds left last
night to give sixth-ranked Jack-
sonville a 77-75 .victory over a
scrappy Oklahoma City team.
Oklahoma City's Chiefs rode the
hot-shooting hand of Charles
Wallace to a 43-34 halftime lead
and fought off several Jackson-
ville challenges until the closing
four minutes.
Big Ten
Standing's

Iowa
Purdue
Ohio State a
Minnesota
Illinois'
MICHIGAN
Wisconsin
Michigan State
Indiana
Northwestern

W
11
9
7
6
6
4
4
3
2

L
2
4
5
5
7
7
8
8
9

Pet.
1.000
.818
.637
.546
.546
.364
.364
.273
.273
.182

Shortstop
G utierrez-

Professional Standings

N BA
Eastern Division
W L Pct.
New York 53 15 .779
Milwaukee 47 22 .681
Baltimore 42 26 .618
Philadelphia 34 34 .500
Cincinnati 31 39 .443
Boston 29 38 A433
Detroit 28 42 .400
Western Division
Atlanta 39 30 .565
Los Angeles 37 32 .536
Chicago 38 31 .449
Phoenix 31 40 .437
San Francisco 27 40 .403
Seattle 27 41 .397
San Diego 23 42 .354
Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 128, San Diego 118
Detroit 126, Milwaukee 111
New York 121, Phoenix 105
Atlanta at Los Angeles, inc.
San Francisco at Seattle, inc.

GB
6 -'
6% 4
11
19
23
23Y2
26
2
*8
S9
11
11%
14

Today's Games
San Diego at Boston
Baltimore at Milwaukee
Detroit at Philadelphia
Chicago at San Francisco
Atlanta at Seattle
A BA
Eastern Division
,W L Pct.
Indiana 45 15 .750
Kentucky 31 26 .544
Carolina 29 30 .486
New York 30 34 .469
Pittsburgh 20 38 .348
Miami 16 44 .267
Western Division
Denver 33 25 .569
New Orleans ' 31 26 .544
Dallas 31 25 .554
Washington 33 28 .541
Los Angeles 26 34 .433
Yesterday's Results
Carolina 111, Pittsburgh 96
Los Angeles 107, New Orleans 101

GB
12%
15Y2
17
24
29
1
1
1
8

given visa
LAKELAND; Fla. OP) - Cesar
Gutierrez, Detroit's prime candi-
date for shortstop this season,
finally got his visa situation
straightened out and was expected
to arrive at the Tigers spring
training camp today from his
home in Venezuela.
The little 27-year-old infielder
is the only unsigned Tiger and the
only regular not in camp besides
the indefinitely suspended pitcher
Denny McLain.
A team spokesman said Gutier-
rez would enter the country on
either a labor or entertainment
visa. There had been a delay in
getting it over the three-day holi-
day weekend.
Meanwhile, McLain spent part
of the ,day Tuesday playing ten-
nis at the Lakeland municipal
court. It is part of a campaign to
get in shape should his suspension
be lifted by baseball commissioner
Bowie Kuhn.
He also has been pitching to his
brother Tim, but he has not show-
ed up at Marchant stadium to
watch his teammates work out. "I
don't remember calling a press
conference," McLain said testily
after several newsmen and phot-
ographers turned up at the tennis
court.

MICHIGAN
fg ft
Tom janovich 15-25 6-7
Carter 3-4 0-1
Ford 8-12 1-1
Fife 5-7 0-0
Henry 2-7 4-6
Grabiec 2-4 0-0
Hayward 4-5 2-2
Bloodworth 1-3 0-1
Hart 0-0 0-0
Totals 40-67 13-18

Ford
Wright
Johnson
Harris
Atkinson
B. Niles
Gipson
Totals

INDIANA
3-5 13-13
10-21 4-4
9-15 4-7
9-14 4-5
1-4 0-1
2-6 0-
13-5 3-3
37-70 28-34

reb
7
3
6
6
2
2
3
1
0
36
3
11
8
4
1
2
0
32

pf
4
5
2
3
5
2
2
0
0
23
1
3
4
3
1
1
2.
15

19
24
22
22
2
4
9
102

Michigan errors: 20; Indiana errors: 14
Half time score-Indiana 47, Michigan
41.
Final score-Indiana 102, Michigan 93.
Officials: Roger Parramore, Art White
and KenKulick.

tp
36
6
17
10
8
4
10
2
93

-Daily-Thomas A. Copi
HALF THE PLAYERS in last night's basketball game with
Indiana try to gain possession of the ball. Mark Henry (23),
Rudy Tomjanovich (45) and Richard Carter (25) battle with
Hoosiers Rick Ford (on floor) and Jim (bubbles) Marris right).,
Tomjanovich got the ball on his way to scoring 36 points, but the
Wolverines lost the contest, 102-93.

SCORES
TCU 102, SMU 95
Central Mich. 82, Ball State 78
Cincinnati 88, Drake 72
Jacksonville 77, Oklahoma City 75
Susquehanna 66, Messiah 64
Illinois Tech 82, Lake Forest 62
Evansville 101, Valparaiso 97
Lehigh 88, Lafayette 68
Texas 81, Baylor 70
Grove City 88, Slippery Rock 75
John Carroll 81, Allegheny 67
Youngstown 66, Steubenville 56
McFerson Ontological Inst. 48,
Whatsamatter U. 32
COLLEGE HOCKEI
Vermont 10, Williams 0
Colgate 9, Oswego 2

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Sales and Sales Management

TED BERRIGAN
THOM GUN N

I I:

Yesteiday's Results
Indiana 102, MICHIGAN 93
Iowa 116, Northwestern 97
Illinois 74, Mich. State 67
Purdue 108, Minnesota 94
Ohio State 98, Wisconsin 86

Concerned About the Environment I
INVESTIGATE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN
PERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH!
The University of Michigan Program in Health Planning will be

Training Program
This Program is designed to develop young college graduates for
careers in life insurance sales and sales management. It provides
an initial training period of 3 months (including 2 weeks at a
Home Office School) before moving into full sales work.
Those trainees who are interested in and who are found
qualified for management responsibility are assured of ample
opportunity to move on to such work in either our field offices
or in the Home Office after an initial period in sales.
Aggressive expansion plans provide unusual opportunities

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