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February 25, 1970 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-25

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, February 25. 1970

PageEigh TH MICIGA DAL

Radiation pollution may cause
thousands of deaths each year

Wallace returns to the race,
but is Alabama his final goal?

- -- ._

THURSDAY NOON LUNCHEON - DISCUSSION

"WOMEN'S
A WESTERN

LIBERATION:
MOVEMENT"

By ROGER RAPOPORT
Editor 1968-1969
WASHINGTON - Two top
Atomic E n e r g y Commission
(AEC) scientists have warned
that permissable radiation pol-
lution could - if unabated -
cause an excess of 64,000 deaths
annually in America.
The scientists, Drs. John F.
Gofman and Arthur G. Tamp-
lin of the AEC's Lawrence Radi-
ation Laboratory, Livermore,
Calif., recently said that current
radiation health standards are
far too lax and urged the fed-
eral government to make the
standards at least 10 times
tougher.
"The current standards," Gof-
man said in an interview, "are
based on the theory that there
is a threshold dose of radiation
below which no harm accrues to
man. However, our research
shows that there is no thres-
hold dose demonstrable for man,
that any radiation exposure,
no matter how slight, causes'
risks.
"If everyone received the Fed-
eral Radiation Council statutory
allowable dose from birth there
would be'a 5 per cent increase
in the death rate by age 30," he
added.
The scientists, in interviews
and in recent testimony before
a Senate subcommittee hearing
on air and water pollution,
sharply criticized what they
called "the bland reassurances
of the Federal Radiation Coun-
cil guidelines . . . (that) may
have falsely lulled us into com-
placency."
The Federal Radiation Coun-
cil is the agency responsible for
establishing the allowable ra-
diation dose for Omerican cit-
izens from peaceful atomic
energy devices ranging from
dental x-ray machinery to nu-
clear power plants.
The criticism, sharpest ever
publicly made of radiation stan-
dards by AEC scientists, is al-
ready causing extreme concern
at high level of the Atomic
Energy Commission. At the re-
quest of Sen. Edward Muskie
(D-Maine) chairman of the
Senate Public Works subcom-
mittee on air and water pollu-

tion, the radiation council is
initiating a month-long review
of the research.
Paul C. Tompkins, executive
director of the Federal Radi-
ation Council, said in an inter-
view that he is asking three
separate government agencies
to study the findings of Gof-
man and Tamplin. "If this new
data seems accurate," Tomp-
kins said "then we will recom-
mend appointing a federal task
force to re-examine the current
radiation health standards and
determine if they should be
tightened."
Tompkins said that if the task
force were set up, it would take
at least a year of study before
actual changes in the guide-
lines could be drafted, and im-
plemented. He predicted that it
would cost billions to redsign
nuclear installations to meet the
proposed standards.
Tompkins added that he sent
a memo to Robert Finch, who as
secretary of health education
and welfare also serves as
chairman of the Federal Radi-
ation Council. "I am calling the
Secretary's attention to the fact
that I have sent a copy of the
Gofman-Tamplin paper to three
independent parties - in the
Federal Radiation Council, the
Bureau of Radiological Health,
and the Atomic Energy Commis-
sion ,for a review," Tompkins
said.
This is not the first time fed-
eral radiation health standards
have been criticized. But never
has such vigorous criticisms
come from such highly-esteem-
ed men inside the AEC. Gofman
has been affiliated with the AEC
for more than 20 years and has
served as associate director of
the Lawrence laboratory. He and
AEC chairman, Glen Seaborg
were co-discoverers of uranium
isotope 233.
"I don't 'know anyone taken
any more seriously than Gof-
man and Tamplin are on this
matter," said FRC executive
director Tompkins: "They have
made a direct frontal attack on
all existing standards. They are
saying that all radiological bio-
logy is wrong. They are attack-
ing the stanadrds of the Federal

Radiation Council, the Inter-
national Commission on Radio-
logical Protection, and the stan-
dards of the National Council
on Radiological Protection and
Measurement."
James Graham, assistant di-
restor of the Joint Committee
on Atomic Energy, said in an
interview that "Anyone with
the scientific reputation of Gof-
man and Tamplin has to be con-
sidered. When' men of this cali-
ber ask for a review, they can't
-be ignored."
One of the reasons the new
report is being taken so ser-
iously added Tompkins, is that
"It might well price society out
of business. To reduce radia-
tion exposure ten fold would
cost billions, it might even cost
more than the Vietnam war.
To comply you'd have to prac-
tically rebuild all nuclear in-
stallations and-the factories that
use any sort of x-ray equip-
ment."
We'd have to review radiation
exposure from wrist watches,
.tv sets and radium dials," he
explained. "Plus, I'm not com-
pletely sure it is now techni-
cally possible to monitor down
to such a tight level."
Gofman, however, said he
doubted implementation of the
tighter standards would be as
expensive as Tompkins esti-
mated. But he did suggest that
the AEC's Plowshare program
for nuclear excavation and the
underground nuclear gas ex-
ploration programs (such as
Projects Gasbuggy and Rulison)
might have to be abandoned if
ten ten-fold tightening of stand-
ards were enacted.
Previous radiation health

(Continued from Page 3) tell the crowd by telephone that candidacy than two more years of
supporters, Wallace will have to he was going to Washington to even the most blatant "Southern
win over the hundreds of Alabama fight the "double standards for strategy."
voters who are currently saying public education." Brewer has long been courted
"I would vote for George Wallace It is difficult to gauge the po- by the GOP, which hoped at one
for president, I would vote for litical impact of the Jan. 31 de- point to convince him to switch'
him forthe Senate, I'd even back cision by the Alabama Democratic parties. Postmaster General Win-
him for the Senate, I'd even back Party, supported by Brewer, to ton M. Blount, an Alabama native,
full-time governor, and I'm going give greater party representation has called Brewer "the finest gov-
to vote for Albert Brewer." to the blacks and city dwellers. ernor in recent Alabama history."
Throughout the campaign, Wal- The party also adopted a state- And when Vice President Spiro T.
lace will continually remind these ment of principles which invited Agnew spoke at an Alabama gath-
voters that if they don't b a c k participation by "every citizen, no ering late last year, he was in-
George Wallace for governor in matter what his religion or race." troduced by Brewer.
1970, t h e r e won't be a George Wallace was not personally in- Despite these overtures, Brewer
Wallace to support for president volved in the party struggle over has said both publicly and private-
in 1972. these statements, although many ly that direct GOP aid would be
Another .presidential campaign of his supporters were on the a serious handicap in the primary.
in 1972 is Wallace's strongest losing of a 36-26 party vote. But Few doubt, however, that Brewer's
weapon against Brewer. The cur- the loss on that issue may not, primary campaign will be well-
rent school desegregation crisis be representative of Wallace's funded from Republican sources.
should effectively show how this strength in Alabama, since he has Largely due to their affection
can work. always received less support from for Brewer, Alabama Republicans
Brewer, although stressing his officials in the state party than are not planning to field a guber-
opposition, to forced integration, from the voters. natorial candidate, although the
h a s emphasized legal actions Despite evidence of surprising final decision will not be made un-
rather than political protest. He Brewer popularity, there are few til the State Convention July 17.'
was one of the Southern govern- observers who do not predict even- With the Alabama black com-
ors who vainly protested to the tual Wallace victory. As much as' munity intent on gaining a toe-
Supreme Court to delay immedi- Alabama would like to keep hold in the Alabama state legis-
ate school desegregation. Brewer as governor, most yoters lature, a black gubernatorial can-
While careful not to attack realize that Wallace is their only didate is also extremely unlikely.
Brewer personally, Wallace h a s real weapon against Washington. Wallace and Brewer, however,
contended that only political ac- Once Wallace, one of the best will not be alone in the Demo-
tion can save Alabama. And Wal- campaigners in the South, nits the cratic primary, and as is tradi-
lace is quick to remind his au- road after his announcement to- tional in Alabama politics, few of
dience that his third party move- morrow, almost everyone expects the minor candidates will lack
ment is the best political leverage Brewer to fall far behind. color.
the South has. One important factor might be Best known among the an-
He made this point on ABC's the Republican Party. The na- nounced candidates is former gov-
"Issues and Answers" Sunday, tional GOP has long been aware ernor James E. Folsom, who ex-
when he took credit for forcing of the importance of the Demo- plained his candidacy by saying
President Nixon's "southern strat- cratic primary fight, and despite "I need a job, real bad."
egy" and then in the same breath, the uphill batttle that Brewer Others in the race include Asa
threatened the White House in faces, they would like to support Carter, a prominent leader of the
1972. him. They feel that a strong race White Citizens Council, and Char-
"The movement we started in by Brewer will do far more to dif- les Woody, owner of a multi-mil-
1968 . . made Nixon promise to fuse the threat of a 1972 Wallace lion dollar construction business.
Five the schools back. and the fact ---_---

Group from Women's Liberation
Response: Pilar Gonzalez, Grad Student from Spain
(Second in a series on "Women: the Next Revolution?")
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER
921 Church Lunch 50c
Student Mobilization Committee to End the War
TONIGHT
meet to plan action
7:30 - 3532 S.A.B.
COMMITT EES-
*Against the draft
* Against camps complicity
Community organizing
GENERALI
SMC MEETING
8:30 - 3532 S.A.B.
Discuss vote on Committee Proposals

LSA student group
adopts constitution

By SUSAN LINDEN tion Board's policy board Friday.
The proposal, which was passed
then LASentssembgylrstby the assembly last month, dele-
nteadopteda LS A S tudent As l l gates to the Administrative Board
nght dotLSitu deont'Goi-hthe primary authority to make
creates an executive committee rules governing academic matters
and a college assembly of repre- suhi authoeri ntoakofgru des
sentatives of each department. all other conduct of LSA stu-
The executive committee will dents would be delegated to the
be elected at-large, in the same LSA Student Government.
manner as SGC members, and will "This would involve an LSA
have 17 members. Student Government-established
Departmental representatives judiciary to hear cases of r u 1 e
will be electedproportionately at violation" said Grobe.s "
the rate of one for every hund-'
red students in a department. Stu-.
dents not affiliated with a spec-
ific department may run at-large Rad College
by presenting petitions with at
least 51 signatures. JI.u
Resolutions proposed by the ex - eie oates to ,
ecutive committee will go to the,
assembly for further debate, and 1
if not acted upon, will become ef-listen lalk
fective two weeks thereafter
The constitution will be voted (Continued from Page 1)
upon by the LSA student body dur- nigh ontgreedfom Patei a
ing, the first election of its exec- night agreed to follow the Radical
utive committee. Nine members College's lead.
will be chosen at the time of SGC Among the speakers at the con-
elections this term, with the re- ference will be R. E. Peterson of
hp.pin fbpDow Chemical Co., Jack Savage,
.LLOILL5 .LiL. U) J ~itUU±1 hL

.!
i
S
1 III
E
k
i
,

Five ule .5u llv AS uuu&, tu i .-Ia ta-t,
standards have been based on that I head that movement would
the assumption that radioac- be the reason I would . . . send {
tivity causes only rare types of 1a message b a c k to the White
cancer, Gofman said. "How- House that unless you give our:'
ever, our studies show that rad- schools back to us, we are going to - "
iation induces all types of can--1 be involved . . . in 1972." he said.
cer," hes added. "In fact, tests Another kind of "olitical pres- U o Myroll Chec )
with a variety of laboratory sare" avilable to Wallace is par-c
animals show that radiation in-' ents' rallies such as the one Wal-ahhere
creases all forms of diseases.' ,ace addressed in Birmingham
Gofman emphasized that at Feb. 8. Brewer slighted the rally
the present time no appreciable { by declining to attend and saying
fraction o fthe American popu- that such gatherings do not
lation is receiving a dosage near "rech the right people." Wallace
the maximum allowable (.17 narticipation and t h e crowd of
rads per year of radiation) ' by '10.000 caused Brewer to call and
the Radiation Council. But ther e PN1-
is a tremendous growth going
on in the nuclear power indus- **"****'*'"
try, he noted. "By 1980, 20 per GETYOURMANWITH A N O GAMES
cent of the installed power in
this country will be nuclear," ft Ad N ___G_ _ ___ _ __CK_ _
he said. "We have to act now W ant____NOGIMMICKS
before it is too late.",____________
© 1969, Dispatch News Service
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A,

m1anng 19eg97LL o e elec~e in Lie I
fall.
"The most important thing at
this . piit is to publicize t h e
elections, so that interested stu-
dents will gather the necessary 51
names to petition to be on the bal-
lot for the executive committee"
said Assembly vice chairman Bob
Grobe.
The group last night also dis-
cussed a proposal calling for the
delegation of rule-making author-
ity to separate bodies which will
be presented to the Administra-
00 active
II ent strike
(Continued from Page 1)
"It would be a good idea if the'
Tenants Union became a political
power," said two girls who havej
recently lost their court case to
reduce rent. "Then more people
would become aware of the union
and the necesity for its existence
in Ann Arbor. They have to get the
union out to the people."
Robert Underwood, 72, sums
it up, "I hope to be a non-strik-
ing member next year. iWth such
members the union will gain the
strength' they need to become an
effective political power - one
the landlords will have to. reckon

executive vice president of Inter-
mart, Inc.; John Spielman, asso-
ciate counsel for Ford Co., and
professors from the business ad-
ministration school.
"I would hope there will be no
trouble at the conference," said
Adams. "We met the interests ofj
the professors of Radical CollegeI
who want to be educated on the
conference."
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES a
for information call
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips /Dayj

I

4

I

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