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February 20, 1970 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-20

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Friday, February 20, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Friday, February 20, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Kuhn

suspends

McLain

indefinitely

NEW YORK UP) - Denny McLain, award-winning pitcher
of the Detroit Tigers, was suspended indefinitely from base-
ball yesterday for what commissioner Bowie Kuhn called "in-
volvement in 1967 bookmaking activities and his associations."
Kuhn announced the suspension after a near all-day
meeting with the 25-year-old righthander and said the ban
would be in effect until his office could complete a review of
McLain's situation.
McLain, dressed in a conservative business suit and
somber,, emerged from the commissioner's office and, after

POLITICS AND PLAY

New sports editors claim reins

a quick one-sentence state-
ment, left the building.
"Fellows I have a short state-
Pment to make," he said. "I am
going to Lakeland, Fla., the Tig-
ers' training camp and I w i ll
be holding a press conference
there Friday or Saturday."
The commissioner said b o t h
he and McLain had decided that
neither would answer questions.
McLain was accompanied by his
lawyer, William Aiken.
The commissioner's statement
said:
"I HAD A further conference
today with Denny McLain, and his
attorney on the gefieral subject
matter covered by our confer-
ence of last Friday. I have decid-
BULLETIN
SCRANTON, Pa. (J)-Scran-
ton beat Susquehanna last
night 24-22. It was a basketball
game.
A jump shot with 18 minutes
r left was the victory margin.
Susquehanna stalled until they
took the game's next shot when
40 seconds remained to be
played.
It missed.
sions made candidly to me by Mr.
McLain and not on allegations
contained in a recent magazine
article, many of which I believe
will prove to be unfounded.
IT WAS THE second time in a
week that the commissioner had
called McLain into his office. The
first meeting was last Friday after
which the commissioner said he
was probing into McLain's "off
the field activities."

ii
daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
CHRIS TERAS
ed on the basis of facts developed
at these conferences that Mr. Mc-
Lain's involvement in 1967 book-
making activities and his assoc-
lates at that time leave me no al-
ternative but to suspend him from
all Organized Baseball activities
pending the completion of my re-
view of his situation. '
"It should be made clear that
the action taken today is based
substantially on certain admis-
The Detroit pitcher appeared
voluntarily Wednesday before a
federal grand jury in 'Detroit
which is probing widespread gam-E
bling operations.
The Detroit Tigers promised
full cooperation with Commis-
sioner Bowie Kuhn's office.
"I HAVE BEEN advised by the
commissioner of his decision to
suspend McLain while he con-
tinues his investigation," Tigers'
General Manager Jim Campbell
stated. "I wholeheartedly agree
with this course of action.
"Since the commissioner's in-
vestigation is continuing, I will
have no further comment except
to say that the Detroit ball club
will continue to cooperate so that
this matter can be brought to a
final conclusion."
McLain, with the Tigers since
1963, had his greatest season in
1968 when he won 31 games. He
was named Amerian League Most
Valuable player, winner of the Cy
Young Award and The Associate
Press' Male Athlete of the Year.
LAST SEASON he was the win-
ningest pitcher in the American
League, with a 24-9 record. He
shared the Cy Young Award with
Mike Cuellar of the Baltimore
Orioles.
He always has been known in
baseball circles as a "super Flake,"
meaning he is a non-conformist.
He has been criticized by writers
for making controversial state-
ments and then denying them.
The Detroit club had to restrain
him from stunting in an airplane.
This ! is the first suspension in
baseball since Leo Durocher was
set down in 1947 for a year for a
series of improprieties.

-Associated Press
Denny McLain talks to reporters
SPAR TANS WEAKENED:
lcers seek turnabout

By JOEL GREER
Even though Michigan and1
Michigan State have collectively
lost twelve of their last thirteen
games, the playoffs are approach-
ing and both squads will be trying
to gain momentum for the all im-
portant post-season action during
the home-and-home series this
weekend.
The Wolverines will venturerto
East Lansing tonight and will re
turn to host the Spartans tomor-
row night at the Coliseum.
Michigan State, suffering
through a six-game losing streak,
has been without the services of
high scorers Don Thompson and
Gilles Gagnon. Gagnon is the
cousin of Michigan's leading scor-
er in WCHA play, Bernie Gagnon.
ACCORDING TO Spartan coach
Amo Bassone, Thompson will re-
turn to his center slot with Bill
.N H..ta ms.....
NHL Standings

Scores
ColL EGE BASKETBALL
Geneva 75, Slippery Rock 69
Notre Dame 77, New York U. 65
Houston 99, New Orleans Loyola 80
Drake 90, Wichita St. 83, o.t.
Louisiana Tech 6, Nicholls 62, 2 o.t.
Colorado State 83, Utah 69
Wyoming 73, Brigham Young 71
Texas el Paso 94, Arizona State 81
Bradley 91, Memphis State 75

I

Fifield on his left and Bob Pit-
tullo on his right.
Gagnon, however, has torn car-
tligs which will be repaired in
surgery. Bassone commented, "It's
a big loss and he'll be gone for the
season."
The Spartans other two offen-
sive trios will have Gordon Sokoll,
Pat Russo, and Bill Watt on one
line, while Frank and Jerry De-
Marco, and just recently eligible
Michel Cherest will make up the
other.
In goal, Spartan Rick Duffet
had some trouble with the Goph-
ers last weekend as t h e league
leaders sent eight past him in the
8-0 Minnesota victory last Friday.
But Bassone noted t h a t Duffet
has gotten "back on the track in
practice" and will be ready.
THE WOLVERINES, on the
other hand, have had numerous
one-game player suspensions and
have dropped six out of their last
seven, including twin defeats at
the hands of Minnesota and Min-
nesota-Duluth.
Tom Marra will remain on right
wing and will also serve as a fifth
defenseman if needed. This gives
Coach Al Renfrew a chance to use
Jerry Lefebvre at a defensive slot,
giving t h e North Bay, Ontario
sophomore needed experience.
Marra will play on a line with
Gagnon and Bucky Straub, while
the Falk-Gamsby-Shaw and Per
rin-Pashnak-Deeks combinations
will remain intact.
RENFREW stressed the power
play in practice this week as
Michigan has had trouble all sea-
son with the man advantage.

The outgoing senior sports edi-
tors last night announced the ap-
pointments of the new editors for
the year 1970-71.
Eric Siegel, a junior English ma-
jor from Chevy Chase, Maryland,
was named sports editor, succeed-
ing Joel Block.
Assisting him will be Pat Atkins,
(executive sports editor; Phil
Hertz and Lee Kirk, associate
sports editors; and Bill Dinner
and Chris Teras, contributing
sports editors.
Siegel has worked as a night
editor for the past year and has
been the head football and basket-
ball writer. In addition to his work
on the Daily, Siegel has served
as the Associated Press sports cor-
respondent for Ann Arbor and has
written for the Montgomery Coun-
ty (Md.) Sentinel and Beachcom-
ber magazine. Hie will join the
staff, of the Washington D a i 1 y
News in April.
MISS ATKINS is only the se-
cond woman to hold an editorial
position on the Daily sports staff,
and the first women to be appoint-
ed executive sports editor. A Resi-
dential College junior from Water-
ford, Michigan, with a d o u b l e
concentration in urban studies and
journalism, she has been on the
staff since her, freshman y e a r.
She has worked as a night editor
for the past two years and h a s
been in charge of the wrestling
and baseball beats.
HERTZ IS ALSO a Residential
College junior with a double con-
centration in urban studies and
history. He is a resident of Bay-
onne, New Jersey, and is con-
sidered to be somewhat of a New
York Mets fanatic. He has won
two of the Mets' banner day con-
tests.
KIRK, who hails from East Lan-
sing, is likewise a Residential Col-
legel junior majoring in urban
studies and history. Kirk is best
known for his Daily bridge col-
umn, but he also serves as the
wildlife editor.
Dinner, a native of Detroit, has
headed the hockey and t e n n i s
beats for the past year and has
also worked as a night editor for
two years. He is an LSA junior'
working for a Bachelor of Gen-
eral Studies degree. He is also a
member of International Social-
ists.
Teras, a philosophy major from
Midland, Michigan, has worked as

Pat Atkins
Executive Sports Editor

Associate Sports Editor

Contributing Sports Editor

Eric Siegel
Sports Editor

Phil Hertz Bill Dinner
Associate Sports Editor Contributing Sports Editor

ti i - r S

Pro Standings

New York
Boston
Montreal
Detroit
Chicago
Toronto
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Oakland
Minnesota
Los Angeles
Ye;

East Division
W L T Pts. GF GA
32 31 12 76 195 125
34 12 14 74 213 166
28 15 13 69 185 144
28 17 10 66 166 145
29 19 7 65 176 129
23 22 10 .56 169 167
West Division

a night editor for the past year
and has also covered national and
Michigan football. He is currently
the head gymnastics writer.
Commenting on his appoint-
ment Siegel said: "With the na-
tional controversy over the black
athletes, and the controversy on
this campus over the funding of
IM buildings, sports has moved
firmly into the political arena. "It
is the obligation of the sports staff
to cover the political aspects of
sports as the more traditional
aspects."

END OF SEASON CLOSING SALE
70, 20,30o Off
EQUIPMENT & CLOTHING

NBA
Eastern Division

.~New Ycork
rMilwaukee
Baltimore
Philadelphi
Boston
Cincinnati
Detroit
Atlanta
Los Angele
Phoenix
Chicago
Seattle
San Franci
kSan Diego

W L1
52 13
45 20
40 25
a 33 32
28 36
29 39
25 41
Western Division
38 29
s 35 31
30 38
29 37
26 39
sco 26 39
22 39.

Pet.
.800
.692
.615
.508
.438
.426
.379
.567
.530
.441'
.437
.400
.400
.361

26
14
19
16
10
9

21 8
23 20
27 8
30 9
28 17
39 5

60 164 136
48 154 172,
46 131 176
41 121 178
37 151 189
23 111 209

--

t
3
A
4
.

Yesterday's Result
Philadelphia 133, Detroit 114

ROSSINGNOL SKIS
HARTS
NORTHLAND
KP YSTAL
HENKE BOOTS
KOFLACK

RAICHLE
SCOTT POLES
ROFF -RENE
(limited quantity)
PROFILE
DEMETRI SWEATERS

GB
7
12
19
23%
24%4
27-2
21/2
11
!I
13
GB
12
17
17Y2
23%
29Y2
1/2
2
7

Detroit 3, New York 3
Chicago 3, Minnesota 2
Pittsburgh at Los Angeles, inc.
Today's Game
St. Louis at Oakland

ABA
Eastern Division
W L Pet.
Indiana 44 13 .772
Kentucky 30 24 .556
New York 30 33 .476
Carolina 26 30 .464
Pittsburgh 20 36 .359
Miami 15 43 .259
Western Division
Denver 32 25 .561
New Orleans 30 24 .556
Dallas 30 25 .545
Washington 31 28 .525
Los Angeles 25 32 .439
Yesterday's Results
Carolina 106, Pittsburgh 104
Indiana at Miami, inc.
Denver vs. Washington at Mexico
City, cancelled

i
z
z
z
x

w- w_

9

--~ University Activities Center
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES
Applications available for the following
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL SEATS
PUBLICITY SOPH SHOW PROGRAMMING-
PERSONNEL MUSKET DEVELOPMENT
INTERNAL SERVICES CULTURAL AFFAIRS CONTEMPORARY
HOMECOMING CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL DISCUSSIONS
Looking for imaginative, creative, personable people
No prior UAC experience necessary
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE NOW THROUGH MARCH 3, UAC OFFICES
2nd Floor Union

esteray's Results

__._ _ ...r,. _. ._ :, . _...._

Ed School and the Environment
(Especially Student Teachers)
There will be a meeting of people in the School of
Education who are interested in environmental
education and in organizing Ed School for the
Teach-In on Sunday, Feb. 22, 1970, at 7:00 at
Rm. 3K of the Union.

i

e

!-- I

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Open Mon., Wed., Thurs., and Fri. 10-9
Tues., Sat. 10-6 Sun. 12-6
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