100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 20, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight
TV RENiTALS
$10 per mouth
FREE Service and Delivery
---NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED---
CALL:
Nejac TV Rentals
662-5671
SERVING BIG 1Q SCHOOLS SINCE 1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fria4nt GAkri ittraa IM I IWIM

- rr itUU , r eo ru ury .V, !IV~

V

ARMCHAIR ATHLETES ARISE

Club competition

fights obesity

Against
Ihe Wa/I1

-. .-

ATTENTION FOREIGN STUDENTS
APPLIANCES Overseas, Inc.
EXCLUSIVE AUTHORIZED EXPORTERS FOR:

REFRIGERATORS
FREEZERS
WASHERS
DRYERS
M
RANGES
"
AIR CONDITIONING
E
WATER HEATERS
TELEVISION
yPHONOS - STEREOS
RADIOS
SMALL APPLIANCES
TYPEWRITERS

International Corp.°
All household appliances in all voltages
and cycles for use throughout the world
EXPORT PRICES... OVERSEAS WARRANTIES
COMPLETE PACKING & OVERSEAS SHIPPING
INCLUDING INSURANCE
All prices reflect diplomatic discounts -
and are free of all taxes.
WRITE OR CALL TODAY, indicating voltage.
cycles, and country of destination

By BILL ALTERMAN
Just for the sheer audacity of
it, let's imagine that you are sit-
ting around your room doing no-
thing except getting obese. And
further, let's imagine that you
don't want to get obese and that
if you had your druthers you
would be putting your obviously
f superior physique through a rig-
orous weekly phys. ed. program.
And what better way to do so than
to join one of the countless sports
clubs that have sprouted within
the confines of this bastion of
mental vigor in the last couple of
years?
Most of the clubs have open
membership and 4iinute club dues.
Usually they meet one or two
times a week. At last count there
were 23 of them and surely your
feeble body could find solace in
one of them.
FOR A START we shall turn
our attention to the Fencing Club.
Founded in 1967, it has grown
from 5 people to 35.
The Fencers meet on Thursday
nights from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., but
the highlight of their week is on
Friday nights when they all pile
into some convenient vehicle and
head for Detroit where they are
instructed in the art of fencing by
renowned musketeer Istvan Dan-
osi. Though it is the most expen-
sive part of club activities, it is
the most rewarding.
Seemingly like most clubs, their
long term goal is to field a colle-
giate level team. But they admit
the prospects are dim. The major
problem involved is getting a full-
time coach, a very expensive pro-
position.
SINCE THEY normally don't
get much press coverage, they
have resorted to another devious
method to get publicity. Some
time this semester they will come:
out with club patches.-
After the patches, the next pro-
ject may be a drive to buy elec-
tric equipment, without which one
cannot hold a truly big-time in-
tramural tournament.
Still, despite the club's large
size, getting new people is still
their chief goal. So if you feel
like killing your roommate with-
out getting too close, the fencing

club will be only too happy (?) to
teach you how.
THOUGH THEY have no mat-
ches scheduled for this year, the
fencers have let it 'be known that
they are only too willing to face
the Ann Arbor Civics Club in no
less than a duel to the death. (It
may be interesting to see who
chickens out.)
If you prefer to kill your room-
mate in a more intimate manner,
perhaps you might like to know of
the judo club. Although club pre-
sident Jim Lemandowski claims,
"We teach judo as a sport, like
badmitton," it still might be fun
to pretend your roomie is a birdie.
The club has about 30 members
and $2.50 per semester dues. Be-
cause of their place of habitation,
the confines of the IM wrestling
room, there is no room for expan-
sion. In addition, one instructor
can only handle about 35-40 peo-
ple.

THE MEMBERS plan on play-
ing one tournament a month with
the first having been Feb. 7th.
against the Ann Arbor YMCA.
The next scheduled meet is Feb-
ruary 28th against clubs from
Ann Arbor, Flint, Port Huron, and
Jackson.
Not all club sports, however,
have fared so well.
Though no obituary has ap-
peared yet, the death of the arch-
ery club has apparently come to
pass. The problem seems to have
been the lack of equipment.
Although the Athletic Dept. has
equipment there is no place to
store it in Yost Field House.
Therefore, the only people who
would shoot were those who owned
their own equipment. This num-
bered about three.

The club started in
24 members and was
members last spring.

1964 withI
up to 501

THOUGH YOU can still shoot
if you like, the club itself is dead
until some . other arrangements
can be worked out with the equip-
ment.
One club which has little in the
way of equipment needs is the
Tae Kwon Do (Karate) Club. Con-
trary to popular rumors, these
sports enthusiasts do not go
around breaking tons and tons of
boards and bricks. In fact (so they
say) it is not considered a con-
tact sport. Karate developed out
of the tranquility of the mind:
taught by Buddhism. Though it is
a self-defense technique, that is
not its sole purpose. As one cute
Karate coed put it, "It builds men-
tal discipline."
THE CLUB practices five times
a week in Waterman Gymnasium
but has ventured outside on num-
erable occasions. Twice they have
journeyed to dorms to give dem-
onstrations and would be only too'
wiling to perform more. In addi-
tion, this Sunday they will par-
take in the Michigan Karate
Championship. Later in the se-
mester they will face Michigan
State.
Other clubs which might arouse
your dormant interest include the
following: handball, boxing, vol-
leyball, and (gasp) weight lifting.
With over 100 members, the
weight lifting club is the largest
on campus. It rates a room of its
own to which each member has a
key. Instructions are available five
times a week with a $15 dues fee.
The volleyball club, a haven for
males only, is but three years old,
yet is already active in outside
competition.

This Weekend in Spo rts I
FRIDAY
HOCKEY-at Michigan State in East Lansing (8 p.m.-Radio
-WCBN)
SATURDAY
BASKETBALL-MINNESOTA, at Events Bldg., 2 p.m.
FRESHMAN BASKETBALL-OAKLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE,
at Events Bldg., 11:30 a.m.
GYMNASTICS-ILLINOIS, at Events Bldg. (after basketball)
INDOOR TRACK-at Wisconsin in Madison
SWIMMING-at Ohio State in Columbus
WRESTLING-at Michigan State in East Lansing
HOCKEY-MICHIGAN STATE, at Coliseum, 8 p.m.

HELLO COLUMBUS:
Union- sponsors sports spree

L

The champions.. .
M .of anonymity
By JERRY CLARKE
IF THE POWERS that be in the NCAA had not ruled that
trampolining would no longer be part of the sport, the Michi-
gan gymnastics team would be virtually unbeatable.
They may be anyway.
Despite the loss of the event that Michigan has dominated
for years, the Wolverine team has shown that it is as strong as
ever. It has easily defeated all competition thus far this season,
and has scored the NCAA record of 164.5 points on the road,
a phenomenal achievement. After a victory over two national
powers last weekend, it now finds itself in the position of fav-
orite for both the upcoming Big Ten and national meets. There
is only one thing that still bothers the team. Nobody seems to
care.
The crowds that remain after wrestling matches and bas-
ketball games are, to say the least, unimpressive. Those who do
stay to watch are "appreciative but ignorant" in the words of
one performer. In all fairness, this ignorance is excusable. Gym-
nastics is an intricate sport that takes much watching to appre-
ciate. I myself, having written about the sport for over a year,
am still confused about many of the finer points of each event,
and will probably never learn as much as I should. But I have
learned to appreciate a good routine, something almost any-
one can do if they go to the meets.
A gymnast must be in top mental as well as physical con-
dition. If he is feeling low, it can have an enormous effect on
his performance. As one team member put it, "When we go out
there, it is just one man against a piece of apparatus. It's not
like in football or basketball where you can take it out by hitt-
ing somebody or throwing an elbow. Here, if there is anything
else on your mind, forget it."
Last weekend, it seemed that no obstacles stood in the way
of the Michigan team after they traveled to Indiana for two
meets. The first was a "double dual"" meet against Southern Illi-
nois and the host, Indiana State. The meet promised to be one
of the top gymnastic events in the nation this year, as all three
of the teams had scored over 160 this season, a feat only six
schools have performed.
I was lucky, I got to go along. Watching among a highly
partisan crowd of over 4000, I was treated to the finest gym-
nastics in the nation. Michigan was tired after the eight-hour
trip in two vans, one of which was not heated, but still man-
age a 162.45 score, good enough to win easily. The Salukis
posted a 159.85, and the Sycamores, 159.
One of the important things about the meet was the per-
formances of the Wolverines' freshmen and sophomores. These
two classes form a large part of the team, and none of the new-
comers had ever been subjected to the dual pressures of an im
portant meet and a large crowd.
They came through in style, a fact that greatly pleased
Coach Newt Loken. Freshmen Ward Black and Ray Gura scored
well, with Black getting 9.1 and Gura 9.25 in floor exercise and
vaulting, respectively. Sophomores Dick Kaziny, a side horse
performer, and Ted Marti on the high bar, also performed well
in the meet.
Michigan students will get one last chance to look at the
team this Saturday when they play host to Illinois. The Illini
will provide the bulk of the competition in the Big Ten meet,
as they recently moved into the national elite by scoring over
160. They are a young team with a veteran coach, Charlie Pond,
and will probably pull out all stops in an attempt to upset the
home team.
Such an effort will probably do them no good. The four
seniors on the team, Bill Mackie, Sid Jensen, George Hunt-
zicker, and Captain Ron Rapper will be performing their last
routines at home. The rest of the team will be confident but
wary and' Loken will, as always, keep the team loose' with his
incredibly disarming manner.
But there is one more thing that they could have going for
them. They are disturbed by the lack of recognition they receive,
and insist that a larger turnout at the meets could help their
performance. On the way back from Indiana last weekend, they
took advantage of my presence to air some of their feelings on
this subject, and I mit say, I agree. They are the best in the
country, and want Michigan students to take pride in that fact.
With all of the talk about increasing spirit at basketball games,
the "minor" sports often get neglected even though they need
support as much as any team.
The presence of an appreciative crowd this weekend could
be the factor that generates a brilliant performance. It is en
tirely feasible that the team could even top 165, which would be
an unheard of achievement. At any rate, they will be doing their
best, which is usually enough entertainment in itself.
It might pay to come and watch; it will be quite a show.

4

If

WE ALSO CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF FRIGIDAIRE, ZENITH,
WESTINGHOUSE, SENERAL ELECTRIC, PHILCO, GRUNDIG,
NORGE, MAGIC CHEF, HOOVER, AND OTHERS.

Order You1 Daily Now-
Phone 764-0558

Fi

Angel explores.the wealth of America.
And records: two of America's greatest orchestral forces. The deans of
Russian violin and cello. Two formidable conductors. In the most opulent
sound yet heard. Beauty is matched only by richness of performance.
RICHES FROyM CLEVELAND

EI
f

i
i
i
1
i
1
c
z
4
l
1

By BOB ANDREWS
Eleventop student qualifiers in
bridge, billiards, and bowling will
travel this weekend to Columbus,
Ohio to compete in the annual As-
sociation of College Unions Inter-
collegiate Tournament. The trip
is made possible by the Michigan
Union, which provides the neces-
sary funds for the traveling, meals,
and lodging expenses of the par-
ticipants.
The Union, which has been spon-
soring this tournament consist-
ently since 1947, has several sourc-
es for the funds used to finance
the trip.
The primary source of these
funds is the revenue collected from
the services carried on in the
Union itself. For instance, t h e
bookstore, as well as any of the
student offices, must pay a cer-
tain amount of rent for the use
of the building.
ANOTHER SOURCE for the
money is the allotment of Uni-
versity funds given to the Union.1
Annually, they are given the lump
sum of 100,000 dollars which sup-
posedly can be used for any pur-
pose which Union officials see fit.
THE
GEORGE
BOT I

One quarter of this money, how-?
ever, goes to the University Ac-
tivities Committee and most of the
remaining 75,000 dollars is used
to pay off a bond issue given to
the Union by the University. Con-
sequently, very little of the Uni-
versity funds can be used for this
tournament.
Student fees also provide t h e
Union with additional revenue.
From each student on campus, it
is given fifty cents of his tuition
dues.
WITHIN THE UNION, there
exists a board of. directors which
has the responsibility of deciding
in what manner the revenues that
it possesses, shall be proportioned.
On the board, there are four stu-
dents who are appointed by UAC,
in addition to a representative
from the faculty, administration
and the alumni.
BiII board
Yost Field House will be clos-
ed to participants Saturday,
February 21 and Sunday, Feb-
ruary 22.

The board has always made it
a 'policy to provide the money
necessary to send students to the
tournaments.
The members of Michigan's
teams were determined in differ-
ent ways according to the parti-
cular event. In bowling, anyone
who signed up bowled nine qual-
ifying games, and the ten b e st
bowlers are to be involved in fur-
ther competition until five a r e
remaining. Those five will com-
pete in the regional tournament
at Columbus.
IN BRIDGE, there was a regu-
lar tournament, and the top north-
south pair as well as the top east-
west pair will take part in the re-
gionals.
Billiards is divided into two sep-
arate categories. One is three cush-
ion and the other is pockets. In
each of these categories, there was
a round robin tournament so that,
eventually, every contestant gets
to play every other- participant.-
One person is then selected for
each of the two categories to com-
pete in the regionals.
The winners at the regional
tournament will move on to com-
pete in the finals to take place at
different sites for each event.

of;

'p:

71I

SFO-36032
A veritable "summit meeting" of
giants in what now is the recording
of the great Brahms Double. Abso-
lutely stunning sonics showcase the
immense virtuosity so extraordinarily
displayed here. Don't miss it!

SFO-36033
Together at last . . . the "dean of
Russian violinists," the magnificent
Cleveland Orchestra, and the great
Brahms Violin Concerto in D. Indis-
putably superb playing. Both per-
formance and engineering rank sec-
ond to none. A "must own" issue.

11

,I

EI

.......

I r

AND FROM CHICAGO.

University Tax Seryice
Fees: $5-20
Call 662-8747 or
665-6050

4

The ailing heart of American cities has been the
subject of many books - but none more telling,
none more jarring than this gathering of nursery
rhymes, altered from their classic form to drama-
tize the desperation of life in our urban ghettos.

"Anyone concerned about our
urban poor and our national
character should read it."
-RAMSEY CLARK, Former
Attorney General of the U.S.

"The Inner City Mother Goose
has arrived just in the nick of
time. If ever there was a need
for that sweet lady's point-of
view, it is here and now."
-JOHN Y. LINDSAY, MayOf

or stop in at
WORLD-WIDE CHARTER
(211 South State)
Last Two Performances .. .
University Players present
ESPERANZA
A Premiere Production
by SUSAN J. SHAW
'7g

I

4

SFO-36034
Two ageless Russian sound pictures.
Ozawa. The Chicago. Spectacular
Angel sonics. This incredible tour-
de-force of musicianship and engi-
neering technique renders a triumph-
ant Angel debut for conductor and
orchestra.

SFO-36035
Performances that mirror the excel-
lences of both conductor and orches-
tra. A virtuoso interpretation for
Bartok; a sonically rich all-out re-
cording achievement for the five
gypsy dances.

DEXTER
Very British .. . buckled
up for style and comfort.
Reservea a sntiff uonnr

American Angel-a 4-album recording debut.
A kaleidoscope of brilliance. And Beauty.

7T)L ltU*R cr <
/AOTiiGOnlSt

1 . T ,. WMENSIMEM i

IV I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan