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February 20, 1970 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

[: :A- r-t--. .-- .

I%^ i r

"~9

Friday, -ebruary 20, 1970

) I

'ive more
wrrested
(Continued from Page 1)

Regents ask Fleming
for minority aid plan'

1 _
.

I

Clear Van Der Hout on sit-in

Ir -- ~ - _

S.

and opposing an officer, $750 bail; (Continued from Page 1)
Glenn Mitchell, '72, resisting and op- students interested in making sure
posing an officer, $500 ball; James that people who are planning our
Brugh, Grad, assault and battery, $250 ftr ilpa uuew a
bail; Fred Miller, '70, resisting and op- future will Plan a future we Can
posing an officer, $500 bail; Fred Par- live with" are invited.
sons, resisting and pposing an officer, The Regents have, in the past,
$750 bail, anid as;sault and battery, $250 said that there is some question
bail; Joel Riff, illegally propelling ai
snowball at a person or vehicle, $250 of whether they have the power
ball; Marie Raulet, resisting and op- to allow tuition waivers.
posing an officer, $500 bail; Susan Lewis pointed to precedents in
Eisenberg, '72, resisting and opposing which certain groups had been ex-
atn officer, $500 ball.
The following people were ar- emnpted from paying tuition in the
rested Wednesday night during past. He attempted to dispel the.
and after the mass march: argument that the State Legis-
lature might cut University funds
Gerald Weisberg, '72, assaulting a po-lauemgtctUirsyfnd
lice officer; Doug Sprinkle, '71, creat- if a waiver proposal was passed.
ing a disturbance; Gerald Piffer, creat- Lewis also cited constitutional
ing a disturbance; Joseph Richards, provisions and opinions by -state
malicious destruction of property; Mike attorneys-general which, he said,
Muiry, '70, creating a disturbance;
The following people were ar- clearly defined the Regents' power
Tested wiyeeterday:-over internal University affairs-
rested yesterday: such as tuition assessments.
Richard Feldman, '71, resisting and At one point during the hearing,
opposing an officer, $500; James: For- A n on uigtehaig
rester; Clark Cogsdill, '71, creating a Vice President and Dean of Grad-
contention, $100; James Brugh, Grad, uate Studies Stephen Spurr pre-
creating a contention, $100; Harold sented some figures on the cost
Rgsenthlal,° '71, creating 'a contention,ofmitnngpentU vrsy
$100. of maintaining present University
programs for minority students.

He said that $1.5 million would be
needed next year just to maintain
such programs as the Opportunity
Awards at present levels.
Several people in the audience
rose to speak after Spurr's pre-
sentation. Discussions between
them, Spurr and Fleming revolved
around the issues of finances,
prioritiestat the University and
the power of the Legislature to
control University affairs.
At one point, a student said that
the Regents "knew very well how
to make money." He referred to
their jobs and said "Where do you
work, Regents? Regent Otis Smith,
you work for GM, don't you?"
Angered by the taunting com-
ment, Smith burst out, "You all
think you're so goddamn smart,
and you don't know anything." He
went on to tell the audience that
"this University is composed of
all kinds of people with all kinds
of demands, each which have to
be considered."

(Continued from Page 1)
came after the testimony of pro-
secution witnesses and other wit-
nesses for defense.
The trial itself was marked by
many interruptions, objections,
and outbursts. At one point on
Tuesday, Elden had to clear the
court of spectators ,and on sev-
eral occasions, the jury was sent
from the room while Van Der
Hout asked questions or was giv-
en warnings by Elden.
Prosecuting Attorney Jerome
Farmer's case followed the pat-
tern most of the LSA sit-in cases
have taken in trying to convict the
defendant of "creating or incit-
ing a contention or disturbance."
However, testimony was limited
by Elden for the first time in the
LSA sit-in trials, to what occurred
in and around the LSA Bldg. the
night of the sit-in.
Elden sustained objections and
warned Van Der Hout not to
bring his political issues of re-
pression into the trial. Van Der
Hout emphasized the point that
he as an individual was not in-
volved in the specific incidents cit-
ed by the prosecution as conten-
tious.
The six-man jury deliberated for
over three hours, before reach-
ing the verdict of "not guilty."
During that time they re-entered
the courtroom twice to ask ques-
tions on the nature of the conten-
tion statute.

At the trials beginning, Van Der
Hout asked Elden to disqualify
himself; and after the prosecution
witnesses. he asked for a directed
verdict of "not guilty" on t h e
grounds that the prosecution had
not proved him guilty. Both mo-
tions were denied.
Farmer, on Tuesday, after the
prosecution's witnesses were fin-
ished, had been granted a motion
to sequester the defense witnesses,
but several sat through testimony
yesterday morning. On the grounds
that the witnesses had not been,
properly sequested, he asked f o r
a mistrial, late in the presentation
of defense testimony. The request
was not acted on.
One witness for the defense was
dismissed by Van Der Hout after
the judge warned him that any-

thing he said in court could be
used against him in his own pend-
ing LSA sit-in trial.
However, architecture Prof. Jos-
eph Wehrer, chairman of the Sen-
ate Assembly's Student Relations
Committee, who also has his sit-
in trial pending, testified despite,
a similar warning.
Several of Van Der Hout's
twelve defense witnesses directly
contradicted testimony of Farmer's
five witnesses, and in his instruc-
tions to the jury, Elden emphasiz-
ed that the "credibility" of the
witnesses had bearing in the jury's!
decision.
The trial was the third in which
defendants have been acquitted,
and the first in which a defendant
has earned his own acquittal by
acting as his own lawyer.

Newman Student Association
presents
rllOY AO JVANQ
author of
THESTRA NGED OD
TOPIC: "-What Is Needed in
Renewal Today"

Frid

ay, Feb. 20
8 P. M

NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson

No A drission

F
IIY 9YMIYIYII IIR \Y II II

ADVERTISEMENT

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it

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OPEN HOUSE
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603 Oxford Road
Sunday, February 22nd
2-4 P.M.

i

PUBLIC HEALTH STUDENTS
for ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION
PRESENT
The First Annual Ann Arbor Environmental Film Festival

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Fri.& Sat., Feb. 20-21 7

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Wiii the friendly lady show thef sailors
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CBS-TV, 8 p.m. EST.
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SUOS(I E TUOTHE M AN DAILY

REFRESHMENTS

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Read Books each Sunday

FIND YOUR
OWN THING
on the
DAILY
BUSINESS
STAFF
see Barb or Phyllis
at 420 Maynard

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Stare at your walls.

Ycu might learn something for a change.
Something about learning and change. Thinking and
participating. Even about film-making and quantum
physics. It's not done with mirrors but with charts.
Three of them.
It's asking a lot of three charts to undo all the harm done
by university education. You have to undo most of it.
But the charts can help.
The charts, and an accompanying handbook (to ease your
transition from print) now comprise a BLUEPRINTFOR
COUNTER EDUCATION. The liberated chart watcher sees
before him the crisis of western civilization in a pattern of
names, concepts and events configured around the most
radical members of today's intellectual and artistic
vanguard-from Marcuse and McLuhan to Eldridge Cleaver
and John Lennon. From there on, everything becomes
self-evident. Or unintelligible.
Maurice Stein and Larry Miller, who created the charts,
are two deeply committed radicals now affiliated with the
California Institute of the Arts in Los Angeles. Marshall
Henrichs, who designed them, is now making a movie of
his own screenplay. Where are you?
VI5KT

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4

Iqmfmm&'fi~ K,~

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