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February 14, 1970 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, February 14, 1970

THE MICHIAN DA-LYSaturday-Fe-r-a-' 14, 197

r ....... _. ..:.... . ,..._ ... .....

Chicago

'7

iewing an emotional 'Concept"

By DEBORAH LINDERMAN
The eight players who com-
pose the cast of The Concept,
which the Creative Arts Festi-
val brought to Trueblood Aud.
are ex-heroin addicts from Day-
top Village on Staten Island.
Actually there are three c als t s
that perform this piece at var-
ious times and in various places
and, to use the words of a mem-
ber, they "fade in and out" in
rotation. Daytop Village- is a
live-in work commune w h e r e
addicts are cured and rehabil-
itated by group therapy a n d
other projects, this play being
one of the projects.
It was conceived and directed
by Lawrence Sachgrow in the
spring of 1968, and was origi-
nally improvised and then re-
corded. Since then it has been,
showing off-Broadway as a set

piece. Thus though its curve
is always the same, whatever
people are doing it fill it in with
what's in them, according to
their own backgrounds-and tem-
peraments.
The performance takes place
on a bare stage furnished with
eight black cubes which are used
as chairs, or whatever props are
needed. The first part of the
action consists of the charact-
ers suggesting, in the briefest
scenes, their feelings and ex-
periences prior to Daytop -
the streets, the prisons, t h e
streets - and then the s c e n e
changes to Daytop and an ex-
tended encounter session.
Although with something as
moving and authentic as T h e
Concept, critical opinion is not
really in question, it might be
said that the production is least

persuasive when it is ,theatri-
cally most conventional. T h e
stylized sketches and prelimin-
ary material are necessary to
the continuity of the thing, but
they lack the conviction and
power of the scenes at Daytop.
In these scenes we get a feel-
ing for the life of the place and
for how the Daytop philosophy
- "until a person confronts him-.
self in the eyes and hearts of
others, he is running" '- is
implemented. In the encounter
session, under stringent obliga-
tions of mutual honesty, the
"performers" learn how to take
it and to dish it out, and chief-
ly how to drop the mask.
The spectacle of each "act-
ing out" himself, and all inter-
acting with each other, it at

times extremely sad, but a1I'sao
absolutely unsentimental, and
at times surprisingly loose and
witty. The participants h a v e
been extreme in their lives and
extreme with each other, and
thus their performance is natur-
ally radical. While the avant
garde in theater keeps striving
for effects that will break down
the barrier between the stage
and the audience, these ama-
teurs succeed, by the force and
strength of their emotion, in
doing Just that.
Indeed, at the end of the play,
they stand up and cryptically re-
turn the applause of the aud-
ience, and anyone who has
studied ,-his Genet, his Marat-
Sadenor his play within the play,
knows what this may mean.

trial nears
final stage
(Continued from Page 1)
- including the jury - a mar-
shall struck her on the head. Del-
linger saw him do it.
"Don't hit my daughter," he
shouted, his face flushed. "That
marshall hit my daughter!"
Foran, who had earlier ex-
plained that the defendants liked
to taunt the police into violent
action and then cry police brutal-
ity, said to the jury, "See that?
That's their tactics!"
Foran characterized the de-
fendants as men "who don't have
the stomach to struggle for the
ultimate good," but instead "bur-
row downward" into filth and de-
pravity.
In Ann Arbor "Conspiracy Vigil"
to maintain a constant presence
in support of the Chicago 7 de-
fendants, while the jury is out, is
being held at the Newman Center,
331 Thompson, from noon to mid-
night today and Sunday.
The vigil, sponsored by the
White Panthers and the Argus,
will include movies, music, and
tapes of the defendants, including
Bobby Seale. The sponsors are
keeping in close touch with the
events in Chicago, and hope to be
able to announce the verdict soon
after it comes in. A march is also
being planned, for sometime after
the verdict comes out.
,% ,° VO t fe 4 t
GDl iceA M ON D
1209 S- University 663-7151

Ctreatide 44jetj 9_t Vl
TOMORROW
3 Pam$ HILL AUDITORIUM SUNDAY, FEB 5I
ONE APPEARANCE ONLY
MR. TOM WOFE4
Author: The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test4
The Pumphouse Gang
The Kandy-Colored Tangerine-Flake
Streamline Baby
Tickets $1.25 1st Floor Union
COMING
THURSDAY, FEB. 19 4
JOHN BIGGERS, Black Artist
SLIDE LECTURE
8:30 P.M.-Angell Hall, Aud. B-$1 .00
Tickets-st Floor Union
COMING Feb. 20 and 21-8:00 P.M.-H ILL AUD.
JAZZ FESTIVAL Starring:
Feb. 20-Miles Davis and his Quintet, Ron Carter with the New York Jazz Sextet
Feb. 21-Cannonball Adderley with Full Orchestra, Alvin Batiste, and William Fischer
Tickets on sole 1st Floor Union Mon.-Fri. 1-4, Sat. 1 -3

IIR~lB~lt O}USP,
3 , a 0
SATURDAY $2,00
SUNDAY DAVID ACKLES Open at 8 p.m
"His presence is strong,... loaded with emotion and import" -N.Y. Times

M

f

+i

141

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN.
Pltti A .l 1 S .' iw 04Wl"1v .. ..r} G } f+'Nf y..r~ . !'

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A B 1 d g., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices a r e not accepted for
publication.' F o r more informa-
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14
Day Calendar
Professional 'heatre Program (Phoen-
ix Theatre): Helen Hayes and James
Stewart in Harvey, Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, 2:30 and 8:00 p.m.
Degree Recital: Eliot Evans, tuba,
School of Music Recital Hall, 4:30 p.m.
Choral Union Series: Canadian Opera,
Company in The Barber of, Seville, Hill
Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Current Positions avail. to students
and alumni,. other listings at Gen.
Div., come in and browse:
Assoc.. Newspapers, Wayne. Mich,,
'Journ, or related bckgnds., exper. not
necessary, for reporters.
U. S, Civil Service research positions
this summer for consulting psycholo-
gist, and behavioral scientists for per-
sonnel consulting on many types of
employers.
The Detroit News, Thurs., weekly
magazine, "The Other Section", writer,
seeking both exper. and new grad.
Coming to campus Mar. 12 for new
.grads, sign up after Mar. 2. If you're a
spring grad. Alumns write now for im-
'mediate openings.
U. S. Public Health Serv., Milan,
ion
Eberhardi
and
Andy
*Wallace
have appeared in nu-
merous concerts w i t h
Pete Seeger and were on
the sloop CLEARWATER
with him this summer.

Mich., Hosp., admin. clerk, FSEE nec.
any area of educ.
Wayne County full year head start
program, social worker, BA or MSW,
prefer soc. wk. exper. with BA, working
with parents and children.
Darby's, menswear store, part time
retail sales positions..
Baia Corp., Jackson, Mich., Electron-
ic Circuit dev., pt. time now, or full
time..
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Physical Therapy Club, demonstration
meeting, Feb. 15, 2 p.m. - 4 p.m.
Physical Therapy Dept., 3rd fI1 o o r,
University Hospital, everyone welcome.
* * * *
New MAlslc presented by Kurt Car-
penter Feb. 15, 8:00 p.m., School of
Music Recital Hall, Mixed, M e d i a,
Laser Visuals, Live Electronics.

I

"

a

PLAYING i375NMAPLERD.7693o

SATURDAY and SUNDAY
1:303:20,5:15
7:10 & 9:05

IF YOU HEAIW
MERLE HAGGARD SINGING
"OKIE FROM MUSKOGEE"
AND HATED IT..,

x

Merle Haggard says the things he's got to say. It's not always what you'd say;
but he speaks his mind. That's country: simple, direct,up front. Merle Haggard's music
is country. His album,"Okie from Muskogee" is a collection of Merle's biggest hits
(Workin' Man Blues, Mama Tried...) recorded down home in Muskogee, Oklahoma.
(You'll enjoy the "enthusiasm" of the audience.) Haggard's voice, his songs,
his music are just about the best there is.
SO lE
"OKIE P1R01 MUSKOGEE"
TURMED YOU OFF..
YOU WERE UALWMTuEn

I

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