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February 14, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"One of the year's most pleasant 8th
movie experiences." -Time Week
The Reivers' fills one with a
joyous sense of life and laugh-a
ter. A -narvelous time is had by.
all."-New York Magazine.
Steve McQueen.
'The Reivers' .

'Open ad
NEWARK, N.J. (P) - A controver-
sial "open admissions" policy born out
of a black student demonstration at
Rutgers University last year appar-
ently is a success after one semester of
operation.
The program, which is in effect on
the Camden, New Brunswick a n d
Newark campuses of Rutgers, New
Jersey's state university, offers non-
credit "developmental courses" in Eng-
lish and mathematics, social studies,
science, communications skills, and
composition to any high school grad-
uate in the area.
The student takes the courses, along
with some credit work, and when stu-
dent and counselor are satisfied with
the student's progress, he can move

missions' plan succeeding at Rutgers

MICHIGAN

Eventually: "VIVA MAX"

into one o fthe university's regular
programs.
Tuition and books are provided with-
out cost. A staff of 75, including
teacher-counsellors was hired for the
program.
John Martin, assistant provost at
Rutgers, said, "The program's success-
ful as far as we can tell. We're en-
couraged."
"We're talking about high risk stu-
dents here," one university official
said. "Very few institutions would stick
their necks out to take such a risk."
Vice President Spiro T. Agnew has
criticized programs such as the one
at Rutgers as the product of "s o m e
strange madness."

The 527 students who probably
would not be in college without the
program are beginning their second
semester in the school's urban uni-
versity department.
"It's nice, I dig it," says student
William Bain, studying to be a com-
puter specialist.
While 13 per cent of the students
have dropped out - for academic,
financial and personal reasons - the
other 87 per cent have remained.
One student at the Camden cam-
pus, Michael Duke, made the dean's
list, and another, John Spuhler, was
elected treasurer of the freshman
class.

About one-third are making average
grades - C, in their credit work,
and according to Dr. Rodney Carlisle,
chairman of the department at Cam-
den, would have qualified for regular
college admission.
"So often," he said, "their street
cultures and their bad schools have
prevented them from showing their
potential. But with motivation and
some help they can do it."
To succeed, the administrators and
students feel, the program and the
courses that follow it must be re-
sponsive to, the. minorities who study
them.
"Sure, give us Western Civilization,"
says Mrs. Frances Matlhare, who is

black and who heads the N e w a r k
program, "but don't forget my ances-
tors."
"The students want to know," says
Cheryl Evans, a black assistant to Mrs.
Matlhare, "just what does 'Western
Civ' have to do with the starving peo-
ple on my block. They want answers."
One course open to the students cov-
ers the movement of the black man
from Africa to the United States, and
looks at" the black leaders such as
Dr. Martin Luther King, Malcolm X
and the Black Panthers.
The State Senate has approved a
supplemental appropriation of $747,-
515 for this semester, and Republican
Gov. William Cahill is expected to
recommend retention of the program.

------

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Feb. 14, 15, Sot., Sun.
THE 400 BLOWS
...... .:.::.
Dir. FRANCOIS T RUFFAUT, 1958
Jean Pierre Leaud stars in this Truffaut
masterpiece. Sensitive story of a young
boy in France,
7 & 9 Architecture
_ 75c
662-8871 7Auditorium

page three

'tr4'tgan

4bp
Batty

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Saturday, February 14, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

it

i

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

GOP LEADERS DEFEND

Carswell land

deal

kTATE

NOW SHOWING!
SHOWS AT:
1:00-3 :00-5:00-
f7:00-9:05 P.M. I

"ONE OF THE YEAR'S TEN BEST"
-REX REED
THE MIRISCH PRODUCTION COMPANY PRESENTS
A NORMAN WEWIOUN FILM

COLOR
United Artists

9%
9%

HALF A MILLION EGYPTIANS marched through the streets
of Cairo demanding vengeance for the Israeli air raid which
killed 70 civilians Thursday morning.
The Israeli planes, reported to be two U.S.-built Phantom jets,
hit the scrap metal plant in a suburb of Cairo by accident "as a
result of technical error", an Israeli army spokesman said.
The Egyptian demonstrators accused the United States of colla-
borating with Israel in the raid. Some Arab newspapers urged the
Egyptians to strike at civilian targets in Israel and U.S. interests in
the Middle East in reprisal for the factory bombing.
The Egyptian representative to the U.N. has sent a letter to all
member nations protesting "the crime committed by Israel against
Icivilians."
Meanwhile, the United States strongly condemned the attack
on the Egyptian factory, but administration officials said it would
have no effect on President Nixon's decision on whether to sell
Israel 25 phantom jets and 100 skyhawks. Nixon is expected to an-
nounce his decision sometime this month.
* * A
MAYOR GINO J. ARCONTI of Danbury, Conn. declared a
state of emergency in the wake of a bank robbery and three
bombings.
Two bank robbers, armed with a machine gun and a sawed-off
shotgun, first bombed the police headquarters, injuring eight police-
men and several civilians, none critically.
They then moved to the Union Savings Bank, about three blocks
from the police station where they removed $40,000 from the cash
drawers. They fled, leaving a bomb which subsequently exploded, in-
juring several people.
The robbers then ran to their car, parked at a shopping center
about four blocks away, and left a bomb in the parking lot which
exploded and damaged several cars as they escaped.I
Bombings also occurred in Berkeley, Calif. where two bombs
exploded in a police parking lot.
The successive blasts of explosive packed in sections of pipe
wounded seven policemen, one seriously, destroyed three cars and
shattered windows in a nearby apartment complex.
* * *
THREE SOUTHERN STATES have been allowed tofile a
motion asking permission to intervene on the side of the Federal
government in a Pasadena, Calif. school segregation.
The three states, Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana, were given
permission to file their motion by U.S. District Court Judge Manuel'
Real. This action is part of an effort by southern states to establish
uniformity in federally-ordered school integration.
Mississippi Atty Gen. A. F. Summer said southern states were:
given only two weeks to comply with federal court desegregation or-
ders, whereas Pasadena was allowed until next September to integrate
its schools.
DISPOSAL OF chemical warfare stocks in Colorado will cost
four times as much as the original plan for dumping the munitions
in the Atlantic Ocean.
Lt. Col. Sampson Bass, director of the disposal operation, said
the dismantling and burning of obsolete nerve and mustard gas
munitions at the Rocky Mountain, Colo. arsenal will cost $14.6 million
over the next three years.
This compares with a $3 million cost which had been anticipated
for the now-rejected Army proposal to move the stocks by train to
the east coast for subsequent dumping in the ocean.
Bass feels the extra cost is justified on the grounds of greater
safety.F
A national Academy of Sciences group advised the Army last year
that it would besafer to break down the munitions and get rid of their
contents at the arsenal rather than try to ship them by train and
carry them out to sea for dumping.
COLLEGE MEN AND WOMENf
WHO ARE INTERESTED IN A CHALLENGE ...
For the 20th year, the Vita Craft Corp. is selecting full-time
summer sales help for the Michigan area. Car necessary : . -
Experience helpful but not needed as complete training is given.
OPPORTUNITY FOR ABOVE AVERAGE EARNINGS, SCHOLAR-
SHIPS AND VALUABLE EXPERIENCE.
INTERVIEWS TO BE HELD IN ROOM 3529, STUDENT ACTIVI-
TIES BLDG., AT 4:00 P.M. AND 8:00 P.M. SHARP ON TUES-
DAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1970.

-Associa

Police station bombed

A police headquarters in Danbury, Conn. was heavily damaged yesterday morning by a bom
minutes before armed men held up the nearby Union Savings Bank. See Digest item.
'VENCEREMOS BRIGADE':
U.. youths sait from Cana
to aid in Cuba'n sugar, hari

disclosed
PALM BEACH, Fla. (M -
Ranking Republicans came to
the defense of Judge G. Har-
rold Carswell yesterday over a
whites-only land deal by the
Supreme Court nominee.
The Palm Beach Post said yes.
terday that the deed, to a piece
of property sold, by Carswell and
his wife in 1966 contained . a
whites-only clause. The newspaper
said the anti-black restriction
was apparently first established
by Carswell's brother-in-law,
Jack Simmons Jr.
A convenant written into the
deed for the Wakulla County pro-
perty, which included 38 acres on
Ochlocknee Bay, said "ownership,
occupancy and use shall be re-
stricted to members of the Cau-
casian race." The property sold
for about $4,800, the Post said.
"I think if you look across the
country at various real estate
documents you would find that
this particular incident is not iso-
lated at all," said Ronald L. Zieg-
ler, press secretary to President
Nixon.
He said, however, that the Pre-
sident had nothbeen aware of the
transaction when he nominated
Carswell. Nixon was on a long
ted Press weekend vacation at Key Biscayne.
"I would imagine that most of
the land transactions in the past
b a few in Florida might have had such a
clause," said Rep. Rogers Morton,
(R-Kentucky), who was attending
a Republican fund-raising party
in Deerfield Beach.
The newspaper said the lake-
side land included about 50 lots,
providing exclusive summer homes
for the Simmons family and other
socialites from the state capital a
n ab Talh se . Te7 wells no longer own property in
Wakulla County.
iever, sev- Carswell, a judge of the 5th
rrying air U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at
into the New Orleans and a resident of Tal-
lahassee, was unavailable for com-
iael Cun- ment.
N.Y., the A Supreme Court ruling in May
e it really 1948 said that private agreements
to exclude people of a particular
described race or color from the use of oc-
fter," was cupancy of real estate for residen-
de leaders tial purposes is not unconstitu-
d no pass- tional.
In the same case, however, th e
ts in my court said it is a violation of the
ays back," Constitution for state courts to
e left the enforce such agreements. In June
1968 the court ruled on the basis
of the 13th amendment and a
1866 civil rights act that "all rac-
ial discrimination, private as well
as ,public, in the sale or rental of
property" is illegal.
Many of Carswell's Senate crit-
ics have attacked his civil rights
rulings during the 12 years he has
served on the federal bench, his
. Monday brief membership in an all-white
esbyterian Tallahassee country club in 1955
Richard and a white supremacy speech he
orial con- made as a 28-year-old candidate
e to the for the Georgia Legislature in
cholarship 1948.

-READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS--
"TWO OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST"
-Neal Gabler, Mich. Daily
"TENDER, LOVING, FUNNY-SAD!"
-N.Y. Daily News
"Besides being one of the truly funny sophisticated
comedies, it starred one of the best looking chicks
ever. -Neal Gabler
IA W RNNY,!M Y---A :E"'""
MOVE...A i n IK a inU fRI. rtf~ s
'GOODBYE. COLUMBUS' IS
BOUND TO BE A GREAT
SUCCESSr
N. w uein as
=' ng
BOAi i T*PAT

SAINT JOHN, N.B. (IP) - A'j
converted cattle transport sailed
from this Bay of Fundy port last
night, taking some 500 American
youths to Cuba for the s u g a r
cane harvest.
The freighter, Luis Arcos Berg-
nes, arrived here Thursday with
216 members of the "Venceremos
Brigade" who has been working on
the harvest in Cuba since No-
vember.
They were replaced by the 500
other youths, also brigade mem-
bers, who came to Saint John on
buses from the United States.
The vessel's departure was de-
layed because. Canadian port of-
ficials, noting the planned in-
crease in the number of passeng-
ers, became concerned that there
were not enough life jackets and
other emergency equipment
aboard, and wanted to insure the
needed supplies could be obtained.
The brigade was formed 1 a s t
fall to aid Cubans in harvestingl
their sugar crop. Returning mem-
bers of the group denounced theE
"corrupt and antihuman system,"1
of government in the U n i t e d
States, saying they "understand
better than ever the necessity for
total destruction of U.S. imperial-
ism ."'.
Late Thursday night, Americanj

customs officials in Calais, Maine,
allowed three busloads of return-
ing youths to enter the United
States, but only after seizing many
Cuban-manufactured items which
they carried.
The goods seized included sug-
ar, metals and souvenirs. In ad-
dition, customs spokesmen said,
they were "retaining" most books
and posters being brought back,
including English versions of Com-
munist publications.
The outbound youths boarded
the ship late Thursday afternoon.
Exactly what type of accommoda-
tions the freighter offered could

not be detetmined. How
eral youths were seen ca
mattresses and pillows
ship's windowless hold.
For 22-year-old Mich
ningham of Syracuse,
trip to Cuba ended befor
began.
Cunningham, who
himself as "sort of a dri
put off the ship by briga
yesterday because he ha
port.
"I've just got 12 cen
pocket, and it's a long wa
Cunningham said as hi
pier.

Services scheduled for
prof. lost in plane cras

A memorial service will be held
here Feb. 16 for Prof. George L.
West Jr., who was aboard a twin-
engine shuttle plane downed in
Long Island Sound last Tuesday.
The U.S. Coast Guard has failed
to find any trace of the plane.
Prof. West, who began teaching
in the navalharchitecture and
marine engineering department in
1956, had been at the U.S. Coast
Guard Academy in New London,
Conn., making an inspection for
the Engineering Council for Pro-
fessional Development, a curri-
culum-certifying group.
Survivors include his wife and!
five children. The memorial serv-

ice will be held at 2 p.m
at,Westminster Pr
Church, with the Rev
Miller officiating. Memi
tributions may be mad
G. L. West Memorial Si
Fund of the naval ar
and marine engineerin
ment.
Prof. West, 47, was an
marine engine design an
proplsion. Before coming
worked for the Newp
Shipbuilding and Dry D
He was an active con
both government and
and had written exter
technical publications.

t

"COLUMBUS"-Fri., Sat., 7:15 and 11:15-Sun. 7:15 only
"ROMEO"-Fri. 9:00 only-Sat. and Sun., 2:15, 4:45 and 9:00
"DAZZLING!Once you see it, you'll never again picture
'Romeo&uliet' quite the way you did before!" -LIFE
PARAMOUNTPICTURE5p .es
A INE 1nL
f CO ZEFFIRELLI
ROMEOT
JULIETU

iiil

Hueys Birth-day Party
We demand that Huey P. Newton, Minister of Defense of the Black
Panther Party, be set free immediately. Profits from this benefit will
be given to the Black Panther Party and will be used for Huey's de-
fense fund.
SUNDAY - Union Ballroom - 7:30

I'

chitecture
g depart-
expert in
d nuclear
g here, he
ort News
lock Co.
sultant to
industry,
nsively in

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
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Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
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