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February 11, 1970 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, February 11, 1970

THE ICHIAN DILY ednsday Febuary1 1,197

I m I m

arts
Yunkers:* A look at an artist of second sight

Buckley: View from the front

By LAURIE HARRIS
Adja Yunkers was walking
along the shore in Sweden dur-
ing World War II. He noticed
a piece of driftwood; bent over
and picked it up. He noticed
that the grain was nice and
there was a clean smooth feel-
ing in the palm of his hand. "It
was like holding a pebble and
feeling I held the entire moun-
tain." It was so beautiful to him
that he had to "do something."
So he translated his feelings
about the wood into a print.
Yunkers had never worked in
prints before. He is basically a
painter who has dabbled in
sculpture and mammoth walls of
pastel. He explains, "I'm a
painter but I make prints. If I
can't solve a purely formal prob-
lem in paint I make a sculpture.
An artist has to be round .
use any medium."
A collection of his prints are
on display in the Lantern Gal-
lery on Main St. The t o n e s
are rich and deep . . . his blues
are like velvet. And yet each of
his colors contains much more
than visual representation. A
deep concentrated ochre seems
to contain infinite color, depth
and perception than its mere
application as a flat tone.
And the designs of each of
the lithographs and serigraphs
(silk screen) are simplistic; each
an "individual inspiration" to
both the artist and viewer. In
their simplicity they give the il-
lusions of calm and quiet but a
second look at their roughened
edges and stark tones m a k e s
one look much deeper into him-
self and the man that would be
able to create such a compelling
piece of work.
"In New York they call me the
painter of second sight," says
Yunkers laughingly. But indeed
he is just that. One is pleased
with his work at first glance
and mystified by it at the
second.
But Yunkers explains that he
has travelled a circuitous route
in the evolution of his work.
He says that he started out
closest to Malevich, a Russian
Suprematist who applied canvas
on top of canvas in basically
white tones. In time Yunkers
evolved to grand panels of ex-
ploding pastel color. But "after
a few years one day I looked at
a work and said 'I'm bored"'
and he did almost no work at
all in the years that followed.
Eventually he started again
and developed the work in
prints that is exhibited at the
Lantern Gallery. And now he is
painting again with a prepond-
erance of white canvas on white
canvas. His love for color is still
with him he explains, but he
can't put so much color on one
piece of work as with his pastels.
And, yet, his understanding of
the potency of color is very vis-
ible in the exhibit.
Each of the prints is done
with a collage technique and
torn paper. Yunkers explains
that in one day he may make

thirty or forty crumpled and
torn papers that are for a great-
er work. However, he adds, at
the end of a day he throws out
most of them and "If one sur-
vives it may result in a print or
painting."

He sees a necessity to be fas-
cinated with the method that
lies behind every one of his
creations. For, he believes, "tal-
ent alone is not enough, you
have to know how to use it."
When tearing paper to make a

collage "the action is in your
wrist; (as he demonstrates on
an imaginary piece of paperi
you don't draw-you rip-and
the speed defines the character,
temper, and even the moral of
the end print."
A piece of work is like a mir-
ror ,to Yunkers: He has to like
and understand what he sees.
He has to be satisfied with him-
self and what he creates. "You
wake up in the morning and
look in the mirror and if you are
revolted by yourself . . . well
it's sad. Its the same with my
painting."
While visiting Ann Arbor,
Yunkers took place in two sem-
inars in the art school and made
a film with Prof. Guy Palazzola
of the art department for use
in an educational television pro-
gram. The exhibit runs through
Feb. 25, Tuesday through Sat-
urday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

sponsors;
a BENEFITfor
Simon Fraser
University Defendants
BOB SHEFF and
CARNAL KITCHEN
Canterbury House
THURS., FEB. 12, 8-12 P.M.
$1 donation per person
LAST kIG DAY!
SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:05-5:00
7:15-9:20 P.M.
* STARTS
TOMORROW *
A NORMAN JEWISON FILM

Feb. 12, 13-Thurs., Fri.
LA RONDE
Dir. Max Ophuls (1950)
Ophuls' merry-go-round
of love, nostalgia, disil-
lusionment, syphillis.
SHORT: Felix the Cat
7 & 9:05 ARCH.
662-8871 5c AUD.

4

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To the Editor:
"Worn out is the appropriate
word to describe" another ir-
relevant Daily review that miss-
ed the whole feeling of the Tim
Buckley performance. First of
all, let Mr. Stratton write his
thesis on mechanical problems,
if he wishes, but don't mas-

querade it as a critique of the
performer. Criticizing Hill is
fine, but suggesting that Buck-
ley alter his style or intent be-
cause he is not in a coffeehouse
surely is not the solution, nor
is playing more 'old favorites'
so the audience can keep awake.
Perhaps calling the concert a

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-k
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A B 1 d g ., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for
publication. Fo0r more inforula-
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1
Day Calendar
Department of industrial Engineering
Department of Industrial Engineering
Seminar: Dr. Larry Symes, Purdue U.,
"Construction of an On-Line System.
for Numerical Analysis" Rm. 229 W.
Engin., 11:00 a.m.,
Genetics Seminar: Dr. J. V. Neel,
'Genetics Studies on a Primitive Pop-
ulation", Rm. 4804 Med. Sci. II, 1:00
p.m.
Aerospace Engineering Seminar: Prof.
T. C. AdamsEon, Jr., "Transonic Rota-
tional Flow Around a Convex Corner
with Application to Supersonic Bound-
ary Layer," Rm. 325 W. Engin., 4:00
p.m.
Physics Colloquium: R. Duff, U.
of Md., "Superfluid Helium" P & A
Collog, Rm., 4:00 p.m.
Dept. of Indust. Engin.' Seminar: Dr.
K. H. E. Kroemer, "A Review of Cur-
Being Conducted
rent Human Performance Research B-
ing Conducted at the Aerospace Medi-
cal Reearch Laboratories, Wright-Pat-
erson Air' Force Base." Rm. 229 W.
Engin., 4:00 p.m.
Zoology Seminar: Dr. Stanford H.
Smith, U.S. Bureau of Commercial Fish-
eries, "Ecological Change and Species
Succession in iFsh Populations of the
Great Lakes." 1400 Chemistry Bldg., 4:00
p.m.
Dept. of Speech (Student Laboratory
Theater): The Mandrake and Gammer
Gurton's Needle: Arena Theater, Frieze
Bldg., 4:10 p.m.
Botany Seminar: Dr. Solon Gordon,
Argonne National Laboratory, "Studies
on Gravity Compensation in Plant De-
velopment", 1139 Nat. Sci. Bldg., 4:15
p.m.
Graduate Assembly Mtg.: E. Conf.
Rm., Rackham Bldg., 7:30 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program (Phoen-
ix Theatre): Helen Hayes and James
Stewart in Harvey, Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, 8:00 p.m.
University Symphony Orchestra: Jos-
eph Blatt, coneiuctor: Hill Aud., 8:00
p.m.
General Notices
Fellowship Apples. for Margaret Kraus
Ramsdell Award & Wallace Radcliff
Award now available for 1970-71:
Awards to asst. grad. student planing
Lo enter Christian Ministry or Relig.
Ed.; forms avail. at Grad. Fellowship
Office, Rmr. 1014 Rackham Bldg.; dead-
line Mar. 1.
* * * *
SUMMARY OF ACTION, SGC
MEETING, FEBRUARY 5:
Approved: WHEREAS: The Univer-
sity Administration has a policy of
reriressing students who take part in
non-academic affairs, by withholding
their grades; and
WHEREAS: SGC firmly believes that
such actions are both illegal and im-
moral; BE IT RESOLVED: 1. That the
University recognize the right of stu-
dent tenants to collectively bargain
with the University concerning rent
and living conditions In the Uiversity

housing. 2. That the Office of Univer-
sity Housing negotiate with the Baits
Tenant Union equitable rent reduc-
tions. 3. That policies of University
Housing be set by student board mem-
bers from residence University hous-
ing,. 4. That SGC deplores the use of
academic penalties for non-academic
offenses, s'pecifically withholding credits
for non-payment of rent.
IP,Mfcj nr
Approved: That, with special permis-
sion, electronic equipment, as well as
the showing of films, may be used by
student organizations in the iFshbowl.
Approved: The SGC in adherence to
a policy of non-discrimination against
the poor, demand thatnPresident Flem-
ing refuse to turn in the names of
those students involved in the LMA
Sit-In or any future sit-in, to either
state of federal authorities so that their
scholarships will not be revoked and
their "education" may continue.
That the Civil Liberties Board be
requested to look into this.
Approved: That Election Campaign
begin on Sunday, March 7, and last
two weeks-and two days; That Election
dates will be Tuesday, March 24 and
Wednesday, March 25.
Approved: That SGC allocate $150 for
the Black Beret Defense Fund.
Approved: WHEREAS: President
Fleming has stated that he will at-
tempt to have all those identified as
involved in the recruiter and R 0 T C
disruptions prosecuted in the civil
courts, in the student courts, and by
the LSA School, all at the same time.
WHEREAS: No connection has been
made between the supposed actions
and the academic capabilities of the
people involved. WHEREAS: Prosecu-
tion in both the civil and student
courts is a clear violation of the pro-
hibition of double jeopardy. BE IT RE-
SOLVED: That SGC will solicit from
the LSA College and the LSA student
statements that they will not colla-
borate with Fleming's repression; AND
FURTHER: SGC urges CSJ not to ac-
cept for consideration any case which
may also be pressed in any other
court.
Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAB, Lower Level
Interviews held at SPS :
Camp CNI, Wisconsin, Soc. Wk. Camp,
Feb. 11, Jewish Community Centers,
Chicago, openings for male counselors
supv. staff men and women, spec. In
waterfront, campcraft, canoeing, sailing,
music drama.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Platt National Park, Sulphur, Okla-
homa, Ranger-Naturalist positions for
summer, apply before Feb. 15.
Wayne County Civic Service, openings
for men and women age 20, to work
with mentally retarded children. Late
June through Labor Day.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Young Democrats, meeting Wed., Feb.
11, 8:30 p.m., room 3D, Union, speaker:
Mrs. Lois Owens, Democratic Candidate
for City Council, 3rd Ward.
* * * *
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Feb. 11, Ash Wednesday
Communion Services at 7:30 p.m. and
at 10:00 p.m. The Rev. Alfred Scheips,
"More Abundant in Service."
Read and Use
Daily Classi feds

performance is the wrong term,
for Buckley was not performing
so as to most easily gratify the
audience's wishes. What Buckley
was attempting to do (or so it
seems to me from my second
row vantage point) was to pro-
vide the audience with an ex-
perience. He was being his
music, not only doing it; he was
participating with his musicians
in a very free form musical
rap, and inviting the audience
to share it with them, if they
could. The rap was not quite
free; Buckley subtley controlled
his octopus' garden, not con-
ducting as much as feeling out
with his people where they were
going; Buckley gliding about the
stage, gesturing beautifully with
his hands and body was what it
was all about. Yes, Mr. Strat-
ton, they were "freaking out"
in that .It was a very stoned
kind of experience, demanding
on our part participation in
their rap with our own selves
and letting the Buckley ten-
taclps weave around us.
Buckley alluded last night to
his fear of fame perverting a
\'star's' creativity. Tim gave a
highly subjective concert in
which the audience was only
secondary and he demanded
that they accept him on his own
terms, and then participate in
an honest experience and walk
out feeling a little stoned, as
with last year's Ravi Shanker
'experience.' If you want to hear
Buckley's songs, buy his albums;
if you want to be with him at a
live performance, don't demand
that he play for your benefit-
tune into him, O.K., and see
how that feels. Tim Buckley was
t h at "Gypsy Wo m an" last
night, casting his spell on all
within feeling range. All that
was required to be enchanted
was that we believe.
-Richard Sonn

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--IM.rt I*ain1111111

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-Daily-Jim Judkis

'I--

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Feb. 10, 11-Tues., Wed.
American Studies' Films
SUNRISE
dir. F. W. Murnau (1927)
Janet Gaynor and George 0'-
Brien star in silent story of
Everyman's temptation, fall, and
redemption. 7:00 P.M.

I

I

v

1

I

I

m

Yellow Submarine
starring Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
Aud. A, Angell Hall-FRI., SAT., SUN.,
3 NIGHTS! Feb. 13, 14, 15-1 & 9:30
All you need is love and 75c
THE BEATLES
COMING: FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE

A.

ALSO

M
dir. Fritz Lang.
the director's first talkie
9:00 P.M.

I

.I I

Lt s

75c
662-8871

ARCH.
AUD.

A

.41

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University 4of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

YOUNG DEMOCRATS
MASS MEETING TONIGHT!
HEAR LOIS OWENS
and other candidates for City Council
PLAN FUTURE PROGRAMS
city and campus activities
-ALL WELCOME

Jon
Eberhardt
and
Andy
Wallace

WaZ1UtbuE

TODAY

I

- 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
A Great Screen Classic Returns
VIVIEN LEIGH
and MARILON BRANDO
n TENNESSEE WILLIAMS'

Wed., Feb. 1

I

K830 P.M.

Room 3D Union

"A STREETCAR
NAMED DESIRE"1
Screen Play by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS . Based upon the Original Play "A StreetcarNamed Desire" by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
As Presented on the Stage by frene Mayer Seliznick . Directed by ELI A KAZAN Re-released thru
United Arhet

: . . . . . . ..... . . .. ..>ePete Seeger and were
Ii:"i:"i':\, ..,,.:............>..... :_...: .::.{.r,. :,.} . .... .> P te S e g e r a n d e r.
zn the sloop CLEAR-
,... WATER with him this
summer. They will be
epresenting the United
States in the World's
Fair in Japan this year
and then tour Europe.
$} T H URSDAY-
circle yurcalendarTHRDY
3-WEEK
f, BEGINNER'S
February 27 and 28, March 2 and 3 AB
'1st 4 accepted
SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND 8 P.M.
DEPARTMENT OF ART NEXT WEEK-
will present Lehar's operetta
THE MERRY WIDOW
TON IT E--
SHOOT
Mendelsohn Theatre

-w*M

WEDNESDAY NIGHT
STUDENT NIGHT
AT THE

AMAD
INNA

I -~~~A A & A OWL A--

2800 JACKSON ROAD_

I i I

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