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February 11, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-11

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Personal Explorations
(An informal seminar in "experiential" or
"situation" theology)
All interested students are invited to share, clarify,
and explore with others those values, ideas, and
feelings most relevant to their lives. Participants in
the seminar will examine many of the basic value-
judgments and assumptions upon which their lives
are based and talk about the subjects-taboo or
otherwise-which they feel are important. Plans for
future meetings will be made at the first-session.

--

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page three

94C

Iir4t ttn

43 a4Ot

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Wednesday, February 11, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

TH U RSDAY, FEB. 12, 7:30 P.M.
2222 STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING
Convener: Lloyd W. Putnam, Office of Religious Affairs
Sponsored by: The Office of Refiigous Affairs

2282 SAB

764-7442

J

"TWO OF THE YEAR'S BEST!"
-Neal Gabler, Mich. Daily

"Besides being one of the truely
funny sophisticated comedies, it
starred one of the best looking
chicks ever."-Neal Gabler

I VERY FMY,
IMMENSELYAPI

"A 'beautiful' movie. One of the
finest and most immediate adap-
tations of Shakespeare I have
ever seen."-Neal Gabler
"DAZZLING"
-LIFE
PARAMOUNT PICTURESpmn ets
A SiffIL 11
The
FRANCO
ZEFFIRELLI
Produt ion.r
ROMEO
'JULIET

LA
. m dnr

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
APPROXIMATELY 600 STUDENTS were arrested when
they tried to stage a protest march at Mississippi Valley State
College.
The predominantly black school has been the scene of marches
demonstrations, and at least one rock-throwing confrontation with
campus security officers during a four-day boycott by students back-
ing 30 demands on President J. H. White.
The demands include recruitment of more qualified instructors,
written rules for conduct of security officers, abandonment of rules
governing student dress, and more public telephones.
The arrests followed an ultimatum to striking students from
college President J. H. White that they must return to classes Wed-
nesday or the school would be closed until Feb. 23.I
* * *
TERRORISTS attacked passengers waiting to board an
Israeli airliner in Munich, Germany.
The grenade-hurling terrorists killed one passenger before being
caught up in a gun fight with police. Twelve persons, including three
of the terrorists, were wounded in the fight at Munich's Reim airport.
It was the fifth Arab guerrilla action against El Al, Israel's
national airlines, in the past 30 months.
* * *
TUNISIAN STUDENTS protesting U.S. aid to Israel pre-
vented Secretary of State William Rogers from speaking yester-
day.t
An estimated 1,000 students besieged the American cultural
center in Tunis yesterday, battling with police and forcing Rogers to
cancel a scheduled visit to Tunis University.
The students refused a invitation to appoint a delegation to
present their views to Rogers, and said the demonstrations would
end when he left Tunisia.
Rogers arrived from Morocco Monday night on the second leg
of his 10-nation fact-finding and goodwill tour of ten African nations.
Leaders of both the Moroccan and Tunisian governments warned him
against any further American arms and or any other aid to Israel.
The leaders also told the secretary that any peace settlement in
the Middle East which fails to take account of the interests of the
Palestinian Arabs is inconceivable.
AN AVALANCHE - Europe's worst of the century - struck
a French ski resort yesterday, killing 42 persons.
Loosened by up to 60-mile blizzard winds a mass of snow jumped
a highway and river before destroying a hotel in Val D' Isere, France.
More than 60 persons were injured, while 26 are still missing.
Most of the dead and injured were young people in the middle
of a ski vacation.
* * *
THE PENTAGON was said to have underestimated project
costs by billions of dollars.
In a statement released yesterday the General Accounting Office
said that the military has overrun costs in 38 major projects, aver-
aging 50 per cent over original estimates. In addition, the statement
said the Pentagon has concealed $10 billion which was supposedly
saved by Nixon administration defense cuts.
The statement added that a major reason for the cost overruns
is that the Defense department has often gone ahead with new
weapons without first establishing a reasonable chance of success.
It also cited production delays and performance defects.
THE DEMOCRATIC POLICY COUNCIL urged the Senate
to block the Carswell nomination and expansion of the ABM.
In a statement yesterday, the policy council sharply criticized
President Nixon's last two Supreme Court nominations, saying they
indicated an insensitivity to the racial situation in the U.S. The
Democrats also said the Safeguard expansion proposed by Nixon was
risky and unnecessary.
In addition the statement blamed present inflation on the Re-
publican administration, citing the White House's refusal to use
pressure to influence private industry wage and price decisions.
The request was part of an election year policy statement chal-
lenging the Republican administration on a wide range of issues, in-
cluding pollution and environment controls, foreign affairs, and crime
control.
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE Melvin Laird said he would
look for ways to improve the Vietnamization program during
his visit to Vietnam.
-Laird and Gen. Earle G. Wheeler, chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, arrived for the three-day visit yesterday. They
are expected to return to Washington with recommendations for
further U.S. troop withdrawals.
Laird said he had been instructed to make a "consolidated re-
view" of the Vietnamization program, which began when Nixon
and South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu announced plans
for a gradual American withdrawal last June 8.

-Associated Press
Rev. Jackson at MSU
Rev. Jesse Jackson (at right), civil rights advocate, talks with Michigan State University students
and members of the staff for the Center of Urban Affairs between speaking engagements in East
Lansing. The urban affairs center sponsored Jackson's visit to the campus.
STRIKE CONTINUES:
Detroit police arrest picketers
during scuffle at Fruehauf Corp.

Nixon asks
penalty on,
polluters
Fines of $10,000
a (lay against
offenders asked
WASHINGTON (M - - Presi-
dent Nixon proposed yesterday
a $4 billion program for muni-
cipal waste treatment to im-
prove water quality, backed by
stricter clean-up standards
and enforcement powers.
In a special message to Con-
gress, Nixon requested nationwide
federal enforcement p o w e r s
against both air and water p 1-
lution, to be armed with the threat
of court-imposed fines of $10,000
a day against offenders.
In addition, Nixon proposed the
department of HEW be given the
authority to regulate the compo-
sition of vehicle fuels, and ordered
a 5-year research program to de-
velop a pollution-free automobile.
At the same timd, the HEW de-
partment issued proposed new
standards to control vehicle pl-
lution emissions, applying to 1973
and 1975 models. These are years
when major model changes are
due.
The President took no direct ac-
tion against solid wastes - trash
- but ordered research to re-
claim and re-use materials from
discarded products, or at least to
find ways of disposing of waste
materials more esily.
He singled out junk automo-
biles as one of the major solid
waste problems and directed his
new Environmental Quality Coun-
cil to find ways of promoting
their prompt scrapping, so they
would not clutter up the land-
scape.
Nixon said the price of an auto-
mobile "should include not only
the cost of producing it, but also
the cost of disposing of it,"
While most of his message dealt
with pollution problems, Nixon
also proposed a plan to carve out
new park and recreation lands.
One approach would be to step
up federal and state purchases of
land for parks and recreation
through full use of the Land and
Water Conservation Fund.
The other half of his plan was
to see whether some of the land
already owned by the federal gov-
ernment - one-third of all the
land in the nation - could be
adapted or converted to park use.
or sold to raise money to create
new parks.
Nixon asked Congress for f u l1l
funding in fiscal 1971 of the $327
million now available in the Land
and Water Conservation Fund,
and said he would propose legisla-
tion to assure a reliable income
for the fund.

NPTH rorUM
RIRTw AVRNI.0 qT t1900TY T01 f9oC

No ordinary
love story;...

COLUMBUS-7 :15 only
ROMEO-9 :00 only

TECHNICOLOR

A PARAMOUNT PICTURE

Direct from Off-Broadway
Creative Arts Festival presents
The Dayop Theatre (o. in
THE (ONCEPT

Special To The Daily
DETROIT-After daytime nego-
tiations and conflict with police,
workers voted last night to con-
tinue their strike against the
Fruehauf Corp.
The union membership rejected
a company offer to settle the
strike. "The strike goes on and
the morale is high," a union
spokesman said.
Black leather jacketed members
of the Detroit Police Department's
Tactical Mobile Unit (TMU), in
an angry confrontation with pick-
eters, arrested two persons in sepa-
rate incidents yesterday morning.
Robert Roberts of Detroit, a
photographer, was arrested and

charged with malicious destruc-
tion of property under $100. Also
arrested w a s Sandy Jenkins, a
striker, who was charged with as-
sault and battery of a police of-
ficer.
Witnesses however, claim Rob-
erts was apprehended after taking
a picture of a patrolman hitting
a picketer w i t h his riot stick.
Witnesses to the other incident
contend Jenkins threw a snowball
at one of the TMU members.
Robert Quick, arrested Monday
for concealment of a deadly wea-
pon, was arraigned yesterday in a
Detroit recorder's court. A De-
troit city ordinance defines a
knife with a blade of over three
inches as a deadly weapon.

Union officials claim the arrests
are part of an ongoing harrass-
ment of picketers.
The strikers, their ranks swell-
ed by n e a r l y 60 students and
workers from Ann Arbor and De-
troit, arrived at the company
gates before police and were able
to prevent strike breakers a n d,
scabs from entering parking lots
for several minutes.
Then the TMU personal moved
in, roughly shoving and jabbing
picketers as they formed a corridor
at one of the gates to enable cars
to enter the company lots. One
woman screamed, "Go home and
give it to your wife, not to us,"
referring to one officer's use of a
riot stick.
The police concentrated their
efforts on keeping one gate open.
However, when company execu-
tives began arriving in their lim-
ousines at a side entrance the po-
lice w e r e forced to shift their
forces in order to protect the com-
pany leadership and their auto-
mobiles.

PSYCHO-DRAMA
OF EX=DRUG
ADDICTS!
"without question the most
"movingtheatrical experience
in New York." - Walter
Kerr, New York Times
TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM
Thurs., Feb. 12-8 P.M.
Fri., Feb. 13-7:15 and 10 PM
TICKETS $2.75-ist floor Union
Available: M-F 11-4; Sat. 1-3

Non-violent vigil planned
1

Coming: Sun., Feb. 15
3 P.M., Hill Aud.
TOM WOLFE-Author of
Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test

IR?

Interfaith Council for Peace
and Michigan Council to Repeal
the Draft are sponsoring a "pro-
peace, anti-military" vigil at noon
today at the Ann Arbor office of
the Selective Service System.
The local vigil is planned to co-
incide with the first day of a
national fast and vigil at the
White House, sponsored by Clergy
and Laymen Concerned about Viet-
nam.
The Ann Arbor action is the
first of a weekly series of Wednes-
day vigils planned to continue
through Passover.
Marchers will leave the Inter-
faith Council for Peace office at
602 E. Huron at 11:45 a.m. and

walk to the Selective Service of-
fice at 103 E. Liberty.
"It is through this door," say
vigil organizers, "that young men
pass from a free society w h i c h
holds that ultimate value lies in
the individual into another world
in which dreams, hopes, con-
science, even life are sacrificed to
the service of goals they can have
no part in establishing."
Organizers say the vigil will be
silent and non-violent. "We go
in peace, to protest violence," say
the vigil's organizers.
Also scheduled for tomorrow is
a march in support of national
Black Panther leader Huey New-
ton and six Ann Arbor Black
Berets arrested last August. The
march will begin on the Diag and
proceed to the County Bldg., end-
ing in a rally there.

U' faces eost of schools
for Northwood's children

NOW
PLAYING

NATIONAL SENtRAL CORPORATION
FO . EASTERN T .-EA7-
FOX VLLaI
375 No. MAPLE P©. "769.1300

TIMES
MON.-FRI.
7:10-9:05

(Continued from Page 1)
According to Scott Westerman,t
superintendent of the Ann Arbor
public schools, the cost of educat-
ing each child is $988.
Westerman says that Michigan
State University "has provided
full-scale education for the child-
ren who live in its housing, and
has also reimbursed the l o c a l
school system in per pupil cost."
"It therefore seems legitimate
for the University to spend as
much as it costs. the community
to educate the children," he adds.

DUSTIN HOFFMAN
MIA FARROW
4OHNANT)MARY

BACH CLUB
presents
"Bach's Music-
An Introduction"
plus
people, food, fun, etc.
EVERYONE INVITED!
Wed. Feb. 11-8 P.M.
1236 WASHTENAW
665-6806 663-2827
663-3819

Try

Daily Classifieds

1f 1 AomoittlZ.
® _ 662.2.56
L t ocrate. 'O wrtOi t 4h .All etsoott owt

"One of the year's most pleasant

But Feldkamp disagrees. "If
these units were-on the public tax
rolls, the students wouldn't have
to pay the per pupil cost," he says.
"They should only pay as much as
Ann Arbor residents pay." Ann Ar-
bor residents pay a percentage of
their property assessment set in
millage elections.
The University would like to
reach an agreement which could
cover a three-year period, starting
with the next fiscal year, says
Pierpont.nHe hopes to reach a set-
tlement in Marbh.
The agreement would have to
be approved by the Board of Edu-
cation and the Regents.
Howard M. Brilliant, a graduate
student in the aerospace engin-
eering department, has been
award d the Edward H. White II
Fellowship for the current aca-
demic year.
The fellowship was established
in 1967 after the accident at Cape
Kennedy which took the life of
astronaut White, a University
alumnus. The fellowship is award-
ed on the basis of over-all aca-
demic excellence and outstanding
contributions to student activities.

SAT. AND SUN.
1:30-3:20
5:15-7:10-9:(5

2col
quotw,.0 4e

rr
movie experiences."
"'The Reivers' fills one with a
joyous sense of life and laugh- f
ter. A narvelous time is had by
all."-New York Magazine.

-Time

* FRI.-FEB. 13th-11:30 ONLY
SUSPENSEFUL AND MEANINGFUL

UKC ZU 'UE

I

A
N
D

RADICAL FILM SERIES

Steve McQueen
"The Reivers"

PRESENTS

Eventually: "VIVA MAX"-

MORGAN
Directed by KAREL REISZ

-

K

with VANESSA REDGRAVE*
DAVID WARNER KING KONG

Mich- iras

6 al:

wednesday
february I11

*"Best Actress" at Cannes Film Festival

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