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January 31, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

*

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday,

music

Sutherland: Cool cream

By R. A. PERRY
Imagine a room of Claes
Oldenberg sculpture-furniture,
made not of plastic but of in-
flated velvet of the thickest
plush; to lounge in such a room
could be compared to experi-
encing Joan Sutherland's con-
cert at Hill last night.
Joan Sutherland, ex-steno-
grapher from Sydney, Australia,
may well be the most famous
soprano in the world today; she
has certainly sung on the Ed
Sullvian show more than has
Teresa Berganza or Victoria De
Los Angeles. Her fame is well
deserved, for "La Stupenda"
without a doubt has the most
ravishingly luscious voice asnd
perhaps the most adept color-
atura technique-partly because
it has thickness at the heights-
than any living soprano. (Her
coloratura certainly astonishes
more than Popp's or D'Angelo's.)
Yet .two criticisms inevitably
creep into any discussion of
Sutherland, and they apply to
last night's enjoyable concert as
well.
One is that her articulation of
text often verges on the molas-
ses-like; after all, a Scottish
folk song should not sound as
if it were being sung in Nor-
wegian. Secondly, her dramatic
,projection of a role lacks in-
volvement; Miss Sutherland
would never be mistaken for a
Stanislavsky student.
Now there are two ways of
looking at these criticisms. One
is to say "the hell with text and
play-acting" and to admire Su-
therland's voice for its gorgeous
opulence a nd mind - boggling

technical abilities alone. You
cannot criticize a Thomas Cole
landscape for its lack of inti-
macy; in other words, to toss
away Sutherland's flaws is bas-
ically to agree with Beaumar-
chais: "That which is not worth
saying is sung."
On the other hand, to realize
the potential severity of these
flaws is to realize the deficits
of last night's recital. The flaws
were somewhat accentuated by
the fact that Sutherland chose
to avoid florid arias (save Au-
ber's "Eclat de rire," program-
med only to gain applause at the
end, and an encore) and to con-
centrate on "art songs." A r t
songs require very close textual
articulation, which Sutherland
seldom gives. A very curious
thing thus happens: the sing-
er captures the audience not by
bringing them close to the song,
but by drugging them with her
undeniably beautiful voice. One
sits in a kind of pleasant stupe-

faction, where songs roll by, all
vaguely resembling one another:
the experience is highly ambros-
ial but not musically valid.
Certain songs, like Massenet's
"Crepuscule," need to be re-
leased with a certain elan, but
Sutherland held the song in
very closely, interested not in
style or spirit, but in pure
sound. When she did become
involved in a song, the result
was splendid, and Grieg's "Sol-
veig's Lied" was most moving
in her rendition last night. At
other moments - involvement
basically hindered by having the
music before her - she sang
quite perfunctorily, as in Ros-
sini's "L'Invito." Two Delius
songs emerged beautifully; five
Scottish folk songs, best left to
folksingers, were mundane.
Husband and manager Rich-
ard Bonynge provided the in-
finitesimally minute accompa-
niements, obviously knowing his
place next to "La Stupenda."

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ENCORE! By Popular Demand:
GRAD MIXER N0. 2
SUNDAY, .FEB. 1
8 P.M.
25c donation
~ ~t THE H-QUSE
~ 1429 HILL ST.

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'WI '

hil

-Daily-Richard Lee
JOAN SUTHERLAND talks with Mrs. James Stewart and Helen Hayes in her dressing room. Miss
Hayes and James Stewart will appear in the PTP's performance of "Harvey" opening Monday.

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A RED WAGON SPECIAL.
IN 35MM
INGMAR BERGMAN'S 1968 FILM
A man's confrontation with war

;W

PRESENTS

Eleven students win
Hopwood Awards

|

NOW

e

DIAL
8-6416

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3 NIGHTS-Friday, Saturday, & Sunday
January 30, 31, February l1
Auditorium A, Ange.l .alll-5c
A booklet of critiques of this semester's 1]960s
retrospective will be available at the ticket desk
for 25c.

GOLDEN

L ION WINNER!

Eleven University undergrad-
uates received Hopwood Awards
for creative writing yesterday
afternoon. The awards total
$1,300.
These Hopwood Awards, and
the major awards to be made in
April, were made possible by the
late Avery Hopwood, a U-M
alumnus of 1905. The playwright
left the University mone to
recognize "the best creative
work" in writing by students.-
Awards in essay, fiction, and
poetry were presented by Robert
C. Haugh chairman of the Hop-
'wood Comnmittee.
In essay there were four
awards: $150 to Susan Schroed-
er, a Literature Science, and
the Arts freshman from 1560
Brockway, Saginawdfor Three
Etssays; $100 to Linda L,.-Rapp,
an LSA freshman from 4839
Westland Ave., Dearborn, for
A Pair of Essays; '$100 to Em-1
my Lou Johnson, a LSA soph-
omore from 177 Riverbend Drive,
Chesterfield, Mo., for "Crazy
People," and $50 to Roberta
Joanne Evans, an LSA freshman
from 3856 Yorba Linda, Royal
Oak for Three Essays."
"In fiction .there were three
, awards: $150 toRuth Bennett, a
freshman in the Residential Col-
lege, from 27126 Sutherland,
Southfield, for "The Man Who
Sat in. Uncle's Chair"; $150 to
Mrs. Dolores Hodge, an LSA
sophomore from 3431 E. Surrey
Drive, Saline, for "Kick Heels
at Heaven," and $100 to Nelson
Feldman, an LSA sophomore
from 88 Palmestron Road, Roch-
ester, N.Y., for "Peter Leepenz."
In poetry there were four
awards: $150 to Kathryn A.
Rogers, an LSA sophomore from
415 S. Kalamazoo Rd., Vicks-
burg for "Crucible of New
Wine"; $150 to John Timothy
Wells, an LSA sophomore from
4761 Springbrook Rd., Toledo,
Ohio, for "Circles"; $100 to Da-
I ThiS WOBMK.f.
is
backa
-Broadside
etc.,etc.

niel Martin, an LSA freshman
from 9 Applegarth St., Newton
Center, Mass., for "The World
in a Convex Mirror," and $100
to Martha Nash, a sophomore
from 2224 Sylvan Ave., Grand
Rapids, for "The Second Sand-
bar."
Fifty-seven students competed
for the awards, entering 17 es-
says, 20 works of fiction, and
32 poems.
' Louis Simpson, Pulitzer Award
poet for 1964, read from his
poems before the presentation
of awards.

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UNIVERSITY PLAYERS present...
Dark of the Moon

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A Powerful Modern American
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BECAUSE OF THE OVERWHELMING RESPONSE
TO THIS PROGRAM WE ARE BRINGING BACK
THE BEATLES MOVIES FOR SATURDAY AND
SUNDAY ONLY
BEATLES DOUBLE FEATURE

presents WINTER

1970,

1960's In Retrospect

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Heavy Duty Steering
and Suspension Parts
" BALL JOINTS
* IDLER ARMS
* TIE ROD ENDS

Jan. 30, 31, Feb.1 ... . .

Shame

Tickets at Trueblood Box Office, Frieze Bldg.
Saturday, 12:30-8:00 P.M.

Feb. 6, 1.

The Misfits

Phone 764-5387

Seats: $2& $2.50

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Feb. 13, 14, 15' .Yellow Submarine

AND MORE

SATURDAY

' Shown Three Nights-Friday, Saturday, Sunday
ud. AAngellHall,7:00 and .9:3
Our REDWAGON SPECIAL PROGRAM makes it possible for you
to see each of these outstanding flicks for a mere 75c .For an-
other mere 25c you can buy a scintillating booklet of critiques of
all this semester's films).
WOW!

FINAL PERFORMANCE

8:00 P.M.

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children-75c

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not continuous with
"FANNY KILL"

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7:30 P.M.

ON

HILL AUD.

REPRESSION

LONG TIME COMIN'

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SPEAKERS:

IC IGAN WORLD'S FAIR
In its final day-noon to midnite
AdmiSSionC: "I,,
$1.00 +4
Variety Shows qu
3:0U,7:0,an

EDWARD (ROWTHER

WORKSHOPS
(to begin following the last speaker):
REPRESSION IN THE MILITARY
1025 Angell. Hall
REPRESSION OF RADICAL LABOR
Auditorium B

Historian, Center for the
Study of Democratic Institutions

ARTHUR KINOY

REPRESSION OF WOMEN
Auditorium C

Radical lawyer, expert on
political trials

URBAN REPRESSION
1035 Angell Hall
THE MASS MEDIA AND REPRESSION
231 Angell Hall
'WELFARE AS REPRESSION1

E

JERRY RUBIN

Chicago Canspiracy

,

,

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