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December 06, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WMNFRMV nFVVMAW9l?, a lan"I

theatre

Former CBS News Reporter. Students Hold Rent Strike
Labels VietnamWar 'Immoral' In New Apartment Building

Terkels 'Grace': Su

By RICHARD AYERS
The seventh play in the PTP's
few Play Project premiered last
ight. Studs Terkel's "Amazing'
trace" is, on the surface-but
mly on the surface-a straight-
orward drama about an old city
otel. The play has a disturbing;
ndercurrent.
Beneath the cliches of the dia-
gue, cliches which represent the
'ay people actually speak, is a
ery subtle development of the
haracters' understanding. The
haracters often moralize, but it is
mily in their actions that they
eally express themselves.
Jack Dellakamp, the son of a
otel-owner, has committed mur-
er, escaped from an insane asy-
im and is .the voice of sanity
the modern city. In opposition
his untouchable and frightened
rother Charlie, Jack takes all the
sks he is faced with.
Perhaps the best-constructed
aaracter is Peg, the mother and
otel-owner. She is filled with a
>rt of ambiguity, with the pos-
essiveness of a mother and yet
n understanding of freedom. But
lost importantly, she has what
erkel would describe as a "feel-
1g tone," .a feeling for life which
ould not be understood by her
ncommitted, "straight" son. She
rows what the whole city is tell-
ig: lier to do and yet she feels a
uch more human love for people.
It is this ambiguity which allows
er to raise compliant citizen like
tarlie and forbids her to kick
at her old boarders. In the end,

of course, it is Charlie who de-
stroys her by following the rules.
Cathleen Nesbitt, the mother,
gives a most striking and brilliant
performance. With the spunk of a
tough Irish immigrant, Miss Nes-
bitt dominates the stage with her
CAST
A Man...............Jay Devlin 1
A Girl...............Verna gloom
Charle Dellakamp .. Mart Hulswlt
Peg Dellakamp ,.. Cathleen Nesbitt
Rudy Dietrich.......Paul Andor
?41r. Guthrie....... Victor Kilian
Jack Dellakamp ..... Victor Buono
Directed by Marcella Cisney
small figure. The audience never
failed to respond to her slightest
intonations or gestures, which is
a mark of her genius.I
Of crucial importance is the act-l
ing of Victor Buono, her rebellious
son Jack. Creating a role of fan-
tastic spirit, Mr. Buono is a major1

ccessful
asset to the play. With immense
size and an immense personality,
he communicates a defiance of
the depersonalizing city in a phys-
ical as well as verbal dimension.
He displays a genius for comedy,
which is so important for his posi-
tion in she face of tragedy.
Two other actors must be men-
tioned, as their performances
create a delightful and important
background for the actions of the
family. The two old hotel tenants,
Paul Andor (Rudy) and Victor
Kilian (Mr. Guthrie), carry their
roles with great zest. The charact-
ers of these two men alone could
make a very enjoyable short play.
Using the people of the city and
the conflicts evident at the bottom
of society, Terkel raises compel-
ling questions about the direction
society is being led from the top.
It is an exciting play and should
be seen.

{
1
a
_
i
1

By MARK TURNAMIAN Criticizing the United States
Calling the Vietnam war "un- participation in the war, Schoen-
just and immoral," David Schoen- brun declared that Vietnam is, the
brun, a former CBS news cor- "single most important issue fac-
respondent, said that "fascists" ing the U.S." because it "does
control the government of South great injury to our great repub-
Vietnam. lic
creatures To Go to Court

(Continued from Page 1)
tions on campus in the future. If
the court rules against the defend-
ants, the case may be appealed to
a higher court.
The four defendants are charged
with violating a state obscenity
law, a high misdemeanor carrying
a maximum penalty of one year in
jail and a $1000 fine. Circuit Court
Judge William F. Ager, Jr., has
the option of suspending sentence
if the four are convicted., Even
if he does this however. Miss

D eo s r t r P a e 'A.1,F VaWtl? l G~ , ii.
NO GFrank wants to appeal the case
on principle. "The precedent would
be valuable in protecting the ar-
tistic freedom of Cinema Guild
Sland similar campus organiza-
tibons'"
"Flaming Creatures" was orgin-
LANSING ()P) - Persons who I been ordered to report for induc- ally confiscated by Ann Arbor Po-
turn in their draft cards in pro- ;tion as a result of turning in the lice Lieut. Eugene Staudenmaier
test against the draft and the draft cards at this point, Col. on Jan. 18 after a professor in
Vietnam war may go to the head Arthur A. Holmes said. the architecture school complain-

i
:,

publicly expressed their dissatis-
faction with administration re-
calcitrance.
However the engineering col-
lege faculty condemned Cinema
Guild in a resolution requested
by Prof. John E. Powers of the
chemical and metallurgical en-
gineering department.
Powers' resolution urged "an
appropriate action to regain some
point of equilibrium" between
"those outside the academic com-
munity who might seek to restrict
it and from those inside who inter-
pret such freedom as license to
go beyond the bounds of common
decency."
Prof. Robert Beyer of the zo-
ology department answered Pow-
ers' resolution in a letter to The
Daily: "I would suggest that some1
thought be given to the role of the
University in, and the contribution
that the University can make to,
society. Society is well able to pre-
serve the old customs when they
have untility and value. Unfor-
tunately, society also seems anxi-
ous to preserve old customs which
have lost their values."
Before entering the case as
"amicus curiae," the Civil Liber-
ties Board of the Faculty Senate
interviewed Miss Frank and Prof.
Cohen a few days after the ar-
raignment to' determine if Cin-
ema Guild was "a group with
serious educational and cultural
goals in mind." Their decision
was affirmative.
According to' Executive Vice-
President Marvin L. Niehuss, this
was "the first time an organized
faculty group has formally backed'
students in a court case."

Speaking at the first in a series
of Ann Arbor Community Forums,
Schoenbrun, who has just re-I
turned from a tour of fifteen As-
ian countries, including North
Vietnam, said he "does not un-
derstand" the United States at-
titude towards communism.
'We Changed'
He traced Vietnamese history
from the end of World War II
to the current American involve-
ment in Southeast Asia and claim-
ed that "we have changed, not
Ho Chi Minh."
Schoenbrun visited Hanoi and
talked with Ho Chi Minh while
in North Vietnam.
Schoenbrun was the CBS bureau
chief. from 1947 to 1961, and1
Washington bureau chief from;
1961 to 1963. Schoenbrun is now
working for Metromedia Broad-
casting and is a graduate in-
structor at Columbia University.
A f t e r Schoenbrun finished
speaking, a four member panel
commented on what the news an-
alyst had said.
'Pre erve Freedom'
George F. Lemble, organizer of
the Washtenaw County Conser-
vatives, felt that the war'in Viet-
nam was necessary in order to'
preserve "freedom."
Robert K. Jagitsch, Ann Arbor
City Councilman (R - Fourth
Ward), expressed the opinion that
the U.S. had an obligation to "stay
and see the job through" in Viet-
nam.
Support of the administration's
stand on Vietnam was also voiced
by Prof. Richard L. Park of the
political science department, and
a member for the Center for
South and Southeast Asia Studies.
No Political Solution
The sole opponent to the admin-
istration's policy was Prof. Rhoads
W. Murphey of the geography de-
partment. Murphy f e 1 t the
problem in Vietnam was basically
a political one and even if the
United States did win a military
victory, the political problem,
would still remain.

(Continued from Page 1)
caused by the building's incomple-
tion.
Later, 134 residents replied in
a tenant-written questionnaire
that they were not satisfied with
the $50 reduction.
One of the students, Randy Birn-
dorf, '69, said that all the apart-
ments had complained to Charter
before the signing of the rent
strike petition. He added that
Charter has "refused to mediate
with representatives about any
problems, including the common
areas"-those parts of the building
such as halls and grounds, not
individual apartments.
Beyer said Charter would meet;
with representatives about the
common areas, but not in con-
junction with Off-Campus Hous-
ing unless those interviews proved
unsuccessful. "We prefer to solve
the problems in our own office,"
he said.
Beyer said that Charter has re-

ceived no more complaints about
Albert Terrace than about any
other of the firm's buildings. 4
"We've had some people who have
complained," he said yesterday,
"but they have pretty much ac-
cepted our solution (the $50 re-
duction)"
He said he thought tenants had
probably signed the petition be-
cause they were "just trying to get
more money."
"The insides of the apartments
were pretty much finished when
they moved in," Beyer said.
Al Finamore, Grad, who lives
in the building, said, "Charter
knew that we would live in a half-
done apartment building for twos
months. Construction workers told
us that most of the work would
not be finished until October."
Most apartments in the building
are for five men, and cost about
$350 a month.
"They're going to have to sue
us to get the rent," said Torn *'
Charon, '69.

HOWE NOW !
"I RVING HOWE ..
Social critic in the tradition

of

of the induction list, the state
Selective Service director said
yesterday.
No Michigan registrants have

UGC Committee Debates j
won-Con, Selection Process

(Continued from Page 1)
f Renner, Willmarth, etc.; which
ould give delegate status to any-
ne who could collect 150 signa-
.res would give them a chance
o pack the convention and makes
mockery 'of Don Tucker's orig-
nal plan which called for a con-
ention of interested citizens, not
self-interested group of politic-
ns trying to undermine student
overnment and the student power
aovement."
Westerdale referred to Michael
enner, '69E, and Robert Will-,
arth, 169, respectively chairman
nid vice-chairman of. the College
epublicans.
Renner said that he was shock-
I by the charges and added "I
an't imagine that members of
GC are attacking a student or-,
anization for becoming involved'
i campus affairs. It's true that
'm trying to encourage College
,epublicans to become interested
i the constitutional convention,
ut I can't see how this can be
zterpreted as an underhanded
btempt to overrun the Univer-
ty."
Westerdale also noted that
enner and Willmarth have ap-
eared at the last two SGC meet-
gs to propose their plan for
elegate selection which also
alled for an immediate petition
eriod.
Their proposal was tabled the
rst time and withdrawn the
cond because of the creation
the Select Committee on the
onstitutional Convention. At one
eeting, according to Westerdale,
iey brought a stack of their
roposed petitions with them.
Willmarth pointed out that the
etitions he brought to the SGC
.eeting were clearly labeled "pro-
osed" and could not have been
sed in any petitioning campaign,
Today is Ladies' Day
60c UNTIL 6 P.M.
Dial 8-6416
*ENDING TONIGHT*
Once again the screen
explodes with rage,
passion and greatness!I

"Westerdale is seeing menacing
shadows where there are none,"
he said.
Westerdale also denied Renner's
suggestion that SGC stalled on
the decision of a convention for-
mat and he charged that Renner
"was trying to get his proposal
passed before SGC even had a
chance to think about the con-
vention."
He added that "The cabal has
already succeeded in aiding ad-
ministrators who, like Director of
University Housing John Feld-
kamp, now advise dormitory res-
idents to hold off on defending
their legitimate rights while SGC
is being re-structered."
Renner suggested that "this type
of abusive statement made by an
elected member of SGC is com-
pletely contrary to the student
government slogan, 'Let the stu-
dents decide.' "
Miss Greenberg said she was
"heartened by the interest of the
Republicans" but added "I would
not like to see any group, however,
use the convention for power
plays. That is antithetic to the
purpose of the convention, which
was to bring together all sorts of
political perspectives in a co-
operative effort to establish a fair
student government."
UAC president Don Tucker,
chairman of the Select Committee,
said he was'going to "do all in my
power to insure that the proposals
of this committee are the most
just and representative that can
be made possible. I am not dis-
counting any plan for selection of!
delegates on the basis of the spon-
soring organization or political in-
terest group. No matter who says
what, we're going to come out
with what we feel is a fair pro-
posal."
THIS WEEK
Thursday & Friday
SUNRI$E
dir. F. W. Murnu, 1927
Probably the most
beautiful and powerful
film of the silent era.
WAon the first
Academy Award for
"Best Feature Film.
Saturday & Sunday
Dial M
For Murder
dir. Alfred Hitchcock
Hitchcock at his chilling

But Selective Service officials ed to the police about the show-
are in the process of taking ac- ing of the film. Staudenmaier
tion against individuals in several viewed the film for fifteen min-
such cases, he said. In addition, utes, then went to the projection
any persons "aiding or abetting booth and ordered the projection-
another to escape his obligation ist to stop the showing...
for service" could be subject to Sit-In
penalties of five years imprison- The immediate reaction of the
ment and/or a $10,000 fine. I capacity crowd was one of anger,
Holmes said persons turning in They blocked Staudenmaier's exit
mutilating or destroying theirj from the projection booth for a
registration or classification cards short time. About 100 students
would be dealt with in accordance staged a sit-in for about our
with an Oct. 24 directive from na-
tional Selective Service Director Two days later, the four Cinema
Gen. Lewis B. Hershey. Guild members were arraigned.
The state director said he ex- '"We didn't think when the police
pects draft board officials in De- took the film that anyone would
troit to send him credentials be arrested," Miss Frank says
turned in Monday by seven per- now. "It came as a surprise to us.
sons at a demonstration at the We thought we would probably
Detroit Area Selective Service have to pay a fine."
Headquarters. eThe Regents declined to discuss
hedemtnrsrt a g the matter . at their regular
The demonstration was staged monthly meeting shortly after the
by some 90persons, including incident. Later, when it seemed
three clergymen, outside the. they might take action against
downtown Detroit headquarters in Cinema Guild, Hatcher urged
the Cadillac Tower. them to adopt a "wait-and-see"
Action already is under way in policy, until it was decided if the
the cases of 26 other individuals Regents would be deemed respon-
who turned in cards earlier, sible.
Holmes said. Faculty Reaction
If an individual is found to be The Regents' refusal to act on
violating the law a report is sent Cinema Guild's behalf incurred
to the U.S. Attorney and the indi- the wrath of a number of fa-
vidual's local board is notified, ulty members. Prof. Terrence
Holmes added.'Sandalow of the Law School, Prof.
Hoe a . Robert Weeks of the engineering
If an individual has a defer- English department, Prof. Daniel
ment, he said, the local board Fusfeld of the economics depart-
may take action at its next regu- ment, Prof. Henry Aiken of the
lar meeting to reclassify him 1-A philosophy department, and writ-
as a delinquent. er-in-residence Leslie Fiedler all

r
1
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I
t
5
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3
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5
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F
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i

I

WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE
January 15-29, 1968

===- - --- -- - -- -

Orwell and Koestler."
BOOK WEEK

I1

Ti'9ht at THE ARK

8:30 P.M.

1421" Hlal Street

_ _ __________

UNION-LEAGUE
Yellow

UNION-LEAGUE
Comes

A HOOT-
with Gene Barkin, Sara Melton; Judy Succop,
Grady Tuck, Bob White, and others.
FRIDAY and SATURDAY-

A

to Bursley
SATURDAY

'',

GRADY TUCK

(From San Diego) singing sea shanties, blues, traditional
and Contemporary folk music, playing banjo, 6 &.12
string guitar, and recorder.

Shows at
1:10-3:30
6:15-8:55

NA

TI
'A GORGEOUS
PIECE OF
FILM-MAKING!"
--SATURDAY REVIEW
COVMBIA PIRES PRESENTS
BEST35 ACTRESS"
Y I II I N
por'ignaWoolf)}
illTHETm m
PRODUCTION U i nwu
Io TIE 111EVf

ENDING
'HURSDAY

Friday: "THE FLIM FLAM MAN"

' CLP AND SAVE t
_ U
':.
PROUDLY PRESENTS: ;
A Collection of Classic Films Selected by Discriminating
Movie-Goers as their Favorites. . . Each of Which
tA&,.. ,Has Left Its Mark on the History of the Screen!
aI
210 S. FIFTH AVE. 761-9700
"ONE YOU
TODAY-N.Y MUST sEE!"
* -- Y n., -ekly, rd Tnrien.
aI
't mENWINNER OF, ;
EST PICTURE OFTIE YEAR MINE ' - 3
O ZE3ST ACTOR OF THEYEAR
ACADEMY AWARDS!
ADEM LlU,
AWDS TERRY- MO1?WE
* l t 5 l THOMAS IECQMMENpEg Id1FRACt3OL
FRI., DEC. 8 SAT., DEC. 9 SUN., DEC.10
7-9-11 6:30-9-11:30 7-9
t
WENSA NY E.6LAURENCE HARVEYAWRS "A BRILLIANT,
WEDNESDAY ONLY DEC. 6 WNE F2A L N
SUSAN SHENTALL ACADER OF 2 PIECE OF
ACADEMY AWARDSI
6:On :5FLORA ROBS ON WORK!"? fo
Special Reduced Rate for Young People Under 16 NORMAN WOOLAND BEST ACTRESS .
omeo SIMONE SIGNORET THE
TOMORROW and RONEES'
Jtliet RpTEiu4NLO CE
SUSPENSE! MIL[SIOBSN MON., DEC. 11 TUES., DEC. 12 WED., DEC. 13
CAE7-9:30 7-9:15 7-9
CHARLES DICKENS' '
hAYLEBSY "ONE OF THE FUNNIEST
I "GREAT iiIuWs FACECOMEES
tn GAMLSjoAN GRpENooo IN YEARS!"-N h. ie
' ._ad- A first-rate bit of
{ t !1frivolity" -DoNew Y*#*w
EXPECTATIONS'" HunST K
Ia
tIPJfI KENNETH MORE t
t: IUHH

4

I

P UL
~JTATEa E M
T COOL
NO 2-6264 Han, UK

i

'1

at 1:40-4:05-6:40-9:15
TODAY IS
LADIES' DAY

iliVii RiilY '"
, ." PETER . .:
0 TOO

F HAL WALUS'
#3ECKET

I

r

There's only one,
Wonderful, Wacky ROSIE!

I

-THURSDAY-
"Billy Liar" & "Lord of the Flies~

A

ROSALINJ RUSSELL "-SANDRAIDEE
BRIANAHERNE - AunRYMEAows
I JAMES FARENTINO o LESLIE NIELSEN

D A

I

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